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Ill health retirement

Discussion in 'Retirement' started by 1970devon, May 31, 2018.

  1. Saffron5

    Saffron5 New commenter

    Hello everyone I am also in this horrible situation of ill health retirement or ill health dismissal I'm currently off sick reduced to half pay after 2 periods of long term sick including this one all related to my on going poor health. The stress of everything is horrendous money, school deteriorating health some days I just don't feel I can take anymore and the impact on my husband and adult children is also horrible. School have made it very clear they want me out they will support ill health retirement or sack me if I don't take it. They are really pushing, repeated requests for occupational health visits with different companies even holding a review meeting without me as i had an appointment couldn't get union rep on that date and am signed off sick and really struggling . They are making me so much worse my physical health is deteriorating and now mentally I am not sure I can face a return so sad
     
  2. 1970devon

    1970devon Occasional commenter

    Saffron, so sorry to hear what you are going through. I understand completely, I feel that if I'd been left alone to adjust to my health condition I might have been able to attempt return. My OH Dr and consultant wrote this in reports- that if I felt truly supported a return maybe be facilitated. Instead I spent months worrying about my job/career and not my health. Since officially leaving in December, I am beginning to feel a sense of relief but also extreme anger at being forced into something tnat was probably inevitable but would have bwen much better to exhaust all options. Claiming my pension is proving difficult despite 'support' of school. I really wish you well and hope you make decisions right for you
     
  3. Saffron5

    Saffron5 New commenter

    I really do feel pushed , mentally I'm not coping at all and physically I'm up and down never well but good and bad days. I would just like some space to know I'm making the right decision but they are not going to give it as they are pursuing dismissal on health grounds. So very sad
     
  4. 1970devon

    1970devon Occasional commenter

    Sorry to hear that. Yes i was dismissed on health grounds- instigated before even exhausting my 6 months full pay- after teaching for 8 years in the setting and over 20 for LEA. Very angry. Although I do have a tribunal for unfair dismissal underway bit this will probably take nearly a year :/
     
  5. AnotherDayTowardsRetirement

    AnotherDayTowardsRetirement Occasional commenter

    I have a question which I hope someone in this forum can assist with .....

    I am 50 and currently going through the IHR process.

    If I’m granted IHR on condition I am not allowed to work in any teaching role does this only apply until I reach age 60 (my normal retirement age) or is the restriction for ever ?

    Anyone know ?
     
  6. LadyForlorn

    LadyForlorn New commenter

    IHR is awarded on the basis of being permanently unfit to undertake any form of teaching. Although it is assessed on the likelihood of improvement between now and retirement age, it is awarded on the basis that you will never be fit to teach again.

    Undertaking any teaching (including lecturing or tutoring) means you may have to pay back all benefits paid out under IHR.

    Personally, I don’t know why anyone who has been out of teaching for a decade would then want to go back into it at age 60. I’ve only been out of teaching for just over a year, and would rather eat my own trainers than step foot in a classroom again!
     
  7. Saffron5

    Saffron5 New commenter

    Devon
    Thanks for reply it's horrible that a caring profession treats people like this just because our health fails , I didn't go off sick thinking I wouldn't go back but because of my physical health and now my mental health it's looking unlikely.
    How have you kept going through all of this
     
    1970devon likes this.
  8. pmichelmore

    pmichelmore New commenter

    If you are granted Tier 1 (accrued benefits) you cant teach, lecture or tutor but can do other work, if you are granted Tier 2 (enhanced benefits you cant do any work at all.
     
    1970devon likes this.
  9. 1970devon

    1970devon Occasional commenter

    Saffron5 I have found it really difficult and still am. My partner after a few months being frustrated has been really supportive. A few of my ex-colleagues have been great as well. Very frequent visits to the GP, weekly counselling, monthly hospital clinic appointments, financially I am in a mess but there is help out there- charities have paid 3 months mortgage for me. The union are now being supportive but to be honest they were pretty poor at tue initial stages! Advice would be access and uae all the help out there. The hardest thing for me ia the loss of my physical fitness that has knocked on to mental health. Up until 18months ago I was running half marathons etc. Exercise is and has been my stress reliever for 48 years. Now I can not use I have put on weight, feel out of control etc so still working on coming out the other side!
     
  10. AnotherDayTowardsRetirement

    AnotherDayTowardsRetirement Occasional commenter


    Raised the question more as a technicality rather than a desire to re-enter teaching at 60 if I take IHR at 50.

    If 60 is my usual retirement age then only the years between 50 and 60 are ‘early’ retirement on health grounds. In theory, I’m only being paid an ill health pension from 50 to 60 as once I hit 60 there should be no conditions attached !

    Just wondering on the philosophy here .....
     
  11. LadyForlorn

    LadyForlorn New commenter

    I suppose ‘theoretically’ you could contact the pensions administrators at any time to declare that you wish to suspend IHR benefits due to the fact that you are now ‘cured’ and resume teaching. Benefits payable would then stop. My guess is that if you did this after NRA then the medical board would be asking some very probing questions about how and when this ‘cure’ came about in order to determine whether it was after NRA or during the period of IHR. You’d need some pretty solid evidence that you were still unfit to teach up to 60 to avoid paying back IHR benefits. Would it really be worth putting potentially a six figure sum at stake for the sake of a couple of days’ supply or a couple of hours’ tutoring?

    You can’t have it both ways. IHR is awarded on the probability of your condition being permeanent. However, it is not like PIP or ESA where you have to ‘reapply’ every few years to prove you are still eligible; once IHR is awarded it is awarded for life. The flip side is that a ‘miracle cure’ could be developed at any time for a condition and you are under no obligation to surrender your pension.

    A very quickl look through these message boards will give you a good indication that the TPS medical board will simply not approve IHR if they believe there is any chance that you will be fit to teach in the future. If you think there is a possibility, then the likelihood is that you may not have the evidence needed for a successful IHR application. If you don’t, then it’s a bit of a moot point.
     
  12. AnotherDayTowardsRetirement

    AnotherDayTowardsRetirement Occasional commenter


    Thanks for the response. You have similar thoughts to me on the matter.

    I don’t have a large pension pot (just 13 years service) so it’s unlikely I’d receive a large enough monthly pension income via Tier 2 IHR to live comfortably without topping it up with a part time income. If I’m granted Tier 2 then I would have to turn it down !

    If I’m granted Tier 1 I’d be fine as I’m more than happy to work part time in any role far removed from teaching.

    Let’s hope TPS see sense and follow the guidance in my submitted expert reports that my health prevents me teaching but not working elsewhere. If not, I’m screwed for 5 years until I’m 55 and can take early pension without any job conditions attached. Fingers crossed.
     
    LadyForlorn likes this.
  13. Saffron5

    Saffron5 New commenter

    Devon so sorry your physical health has changed so quickly it's a grieving process I think, I have had years of deteriorating health but still find it difficult to accept my limitations and mentally it's very hard at the moment. I also find that others don't understand even family.
    Money is my biggest worry but rather than thinking years ahead I'm just trying to do days otherwise it's been too overwhelming.
    Trying to access some counselling but I don't have any yet and can't afford to pay teacher support are looking into it for me.
    I have so many hospital appointments coming up and I guess occupational health will be in touch too.
    Really just trying to get through the day one at a time
    I hope you see the light at the end of the tunnel soon and everything comes together
     
    1970devon likes this.
  14. camdragon

    camdragon New commenter

    This thread has been very helpful. I'm just starting the process of IHR, age 50, having agreed a settlement to leave my teaching job on Dec 31st. I have a deteriorating eye condition and have been encouraged by all parties (school, GP, consultant) to start the application. I have to say the forms are very intimidating and I'm a bit "rabbit in the headlights" at the moment. I'm trying to get hold of my union to see if they'll help me through them, I'm typing this whilst on hold....
     
    1970devon likes this.
  15. pmichelmore

    pmichelmore New commenter

    Get as much medial evidence as you can, stating that your condition is permanent and that you are unfit to teach, the more the better, also OH involvement is important- have they assessed you?
    It is a bit of a minefield but take your time and take it stage by stage. Best wishes and good luck.
     
    1970devon likes this.
  16. camdragon

    camdragon New commenter

    NAUWT have assigned a caseworker to help me through it. I had an OH assessment at my employer's insistance (they didn't believe I had a serious condition) 12 months ago, so I think that will still be relevant. It was entirely in my favour. Have also just started immunosuppressant therapy (longterm) so that evidence will help too, I hope. Thanks.
     
  17. LadyForlorn

    LadyForlorn New commenter

    Hi there. I was awarded tier 1 ill health retirement just over a year ago due to deteriorating eyesight. If you have any questions about the process, please let me know. I still have electronic copies of all the evidence I sent off (including all the employer’s forms) if you have any queries about what sorts of things to include.

    Good luck with your application. It is quite a gruelling process, but worth taking slowly in order to make sure you have everything you need.
     
  18. lju

    lju New commenter

    I'm currently waiting for a decision on ill health retirement. How long did TP take to decide after you applied?
     
  19. pmichelmore

    pmichelmore New commenter

    Hi, for me it was 12 days (9 working days), the lump sum arrived on Friday- 5 weeks after my acceptance letter. I was awarded Tier 1 for your info, not sure if that effects timescales?
    Good luck :)
     
  20. lju

    lju New commenter

    Thanks for the reply. My initial application was rejected in around 7 days. TP sent the rejection stating what they felt they needed. I supplied this and appealed their decision. I have been waiting a month now, so fingers crossed it's going through.
     

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