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IGCSE English Lang 2 years ago...IB English A1 SL today

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by ian60, May 3, 2011.

  1. ian60

    ian60 New commenter

    Grade 12 students came out of today's exam saying that one of the 'unseen' texts in the exam was the same as one that had been set two years ago by Cambridge IGCSE and studied in class by these students.
    I am amazed that this wasn't picked up in Cardiff, surely the IGCSE/IB combination is a very common one in International schools, surely it would be common sense to monitor what the other boards are setting.
    Then there is a danger that those students who had studied this previously would then respond at a G10 IGCSE level, rather than G12 SL.

    Any English teachers care to comment.
     
  2. MisterMaker

    MisterMaker Occasional commenter

    I thought it was widely known that IB folk plagiarise.
     
  3. Thisismytruth

    Thisismytruth New commenter

    What was the passage? I have seen virtually the same extracts (from 'Birdsong' for example) set across boards at a range of levels. It all depends on what focus the candidates are given by the question.
     
  4. SMT dude

    SMT dude New commenter

    [​IMG]
    nice one, Sir Alex.
    More seriously this silly accident (if it is as described, I haven't seen the papers or talked to this morning's emerging candidates) testifies to the narrowing of the 'canon'.
    Years ago, it was felt, rightly, that the canon needed expansion to reflect post-colonial, post-feminist realities and of course the word 'relevance' was never far away.
    Paradoxically, however, the amount of poetry and prose that examiners can draw upon has actually decreased. Once you've thrown away all the Dead White Males, and made further eliminations using patronising and belittling criteria about what modern teenagers can cope with, you don't have a lot left.
    So it's hardly suprising that these two organisations' examiners end up fishing the same murky pond.
     

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