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If you could help a foreigner...

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by AriannaCapuani, Jul 3, 2012.

  1. Dear All,

    My name is Arianna and I am an Italian national. My Italian QTS has been fully recognized by GTCE but I am not getting any supply jobs through the agency I registered with. I suppose a good way to maximise opportunities would be to try register with more agencies, but I recently got a very frustrating reply from one saying that there are stricter regulations to comply with, that I am very likely to find similar restrictions with all supply agencies, and that in short, they could not let me register.

    Apparently, the reason was that I haven't been teaching in the last two years (except for private tutoring).

    Could you confirm that most teaching agencies are looking for an uninterrupted career?

    Five weeks ago or so TheoGriff replied to one of my questions saying that schools are very likely not to hire you if all your teaching experience was gained abroad, and that a way to get round to it would be supply teaching.

    I think you can understand how frustrated I am now: if I can't even supply, what's the use of my QTS recognition?


    I hope you can help understand this matter.
    Thank you!

    Best,
    Arianna
     
  2. Dear All,

    My name is Arianna and I am an Italian national. My Italian QTS has been fully recognized by GTCE but I am not getting any supply jobs through the agency I registered with. I suppose a good way to maximise opportunities would be to try register with more agencies, but I recently got a very frustrating reply from one saying that there are stricter regulations to comply with, that I am very likely to find similar restrictions with all supply agencies, and that in short, they could not let me register.

    Apparently, the reason was that I haven't been teaching in the last two years (except for private tutoring).

    Could you confirm that most teaching agencies are looking for an uninterrupted career?

    Five weeks ago or so TheoGriff replied to one of my questions saying that schools are very likely not to hire you if all your teaching experience was gained abroad, and that a way to get round to it would be supply teaching.

    I think you can understand how frustrated I am now: if I can't even supply, what's the use of my QTS recognition?


    I hope you can help understand this matter.
    Thank you!

    Best,
    Arianna
     
  3. A few years ago I returned to teaching after 4 years away. Agencies suggested I should do volountary work in local schools or nurseries so that I could gain recent experience. Perhaps this would help, although I don't know how long you would need to volounteer for. This could also help you to get references.
     
  4. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    I'm a UK citizen who did a PGCE in the UK and gained QTS in 1999.
    I had plentiful supply work (long and short term) until it started to fall off in 2009.
    I had about 30 days of work in the 2010/11 school year and only about 17 or 18 days in this school year until the end of May when I decided to resign from my LA agency and draw my pension early.
    I don't think that the issue is your qualification being from overseas as you have gained QTS here and I've know lots of European teachers in your position who had no problem getting supply work years ago.
    The issue is the same one that has scuppred my employment chances, namely that schools are no longer employing qualified teachers for short-term supply cover work. They ask for Cover Supervisers, who don't have to be qualified in any way above grade C in English and Maths at GCSE and the pay can half that of a qualified teacher (or less).
    Of course, many qualified teachers, faced with getting little or no work any more, are accepting bookings as Cover Supervisers, so the school gets a qualified person as before but at greatly reduced rates!
    I was not prepared to accept reduced CS pay but it might be the avenue for you as a way of getting recent experience for your CV.
     
  5. spiderwomen

    spiderwomen New commenter

    There is a huge shortage of work and there is no sure way of getting work. If you've registered with agencies, then keep calling them. In the past, I've demanded answers as to why I haven't received work from agencies. There is work around because there isn't a shortage of agents! Agents if questioned will give responses such as: 'the school request the same teachers back, 'all our work is in so and so area,' eliminate them as useless and register with other agencies. I've de-registered from lots of agencies if they can't get me work - I don't want them holding my details on their system. Just keep going and volunteer in the meantime. Alternatvely, Try TA work for a while as well. I've always found the minute I've expressed an interest in support work, I've been inundated with offers! However, I've never actually done it, which must **** the consultants right off! It's nice to give back once in a while!
     
  6. PaulDG

    PaulDG Occasional commenter

    There are far more teachers scratching around for work than there is work (how else would schools & agencies get away with simply saying "sorry" when a supply teacher makes a 30 mile journey only to be told "we don't need you today" - no expenses, no minimum half day's pay for the time spent, etc.?)

    And so, schools can afford to be picky - if an agency sends them a teacher who the school doesn't get on with, that agency may never get a call again from that school because there are loads of other agencies too...

    So agencies just don't take any risks.. An unfounded allegation on your CRB? No work - not because it's fair or just but because there are thousands of other teachers out there with totally clean CVs so no point in taking any risk at all.

    Same with recent, relevant, classroom experience. As there are tens of thousands of newly qualified teachers who've just finished training and have just come from a classroom, why bother with someone who's not been in a classroom for a year?

    I think you'll find there are tens of thousands of British nationals with full teaching qualifications that don't need to be "recognised" as they're actually English qualifications who wonder why, since there is so little work, we're recognising foreign qualification at all.
     
  7. Ciao Arianna,
    You have had some good advice here from other posters. How many agencies have you registered with? Sometimes it also depends on how you "sell" yourself and in which part of the country you are trying to find work.
    Feel free to send me a PM.
    In bocca al lupo!
     
  8. As far as the uninterrupted career path is concerned, that is a red herring. I qualified in 1996, worked in teaching until 2006, then moved abroad and did other things. When I returned to the UK in 2010 it made sense to do supply work while I 'found my feet'. No issue was ever made of the fact that I hadn't taught for 4 years.
    I would suggest you keep in regular touch with your agency - e-mail them on a Friday with your availability for the following week, and ring them if anything changes. Keep your name at the top of their pile!!
     

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