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iep help please

Discussion in 'Special educational needs' started by donna9, Sep 12, 2011.

  1. Hi guys I wonder if I can pick your brains please!
    I have a new child in my class (y1 mainstream) who has never been in school before. He is obviously on the autistic spectrum and we are applying for emergency funding. However, I have been asked to write him an IEP asap to get the ball moving. He scored just 13 on his Bury Infant check we did recently. He talks mostly in 2 word statements and rarely answers questions you ask him, or even acknowledge you have asked him one! He can't name some simple everyday objects and has no understanding of letters or numbers. He plays alongside other children but is not in the slightest bit interested and will purposely move away from an activity he has chosen if another child tries to join in.
    I have very little experience with children with these difficulties and in particular speech and lang difficulties and wondered what short achievable targets would be suitable for an IEP. Obviously, you do not know the child but any pointers would be helpful.

    Thanks
     
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    Hi there,


    I work in a special school
    and we write and review IEP's termly for all of our pupils and we look to set
    an achievable target for social skills, communication skills and either
    physical or behavioural difficulties depending on the child and then each of
    these is broken down into 3 'I will try to...' steps to help the child achieve
    each target. These are linked to the annual aims for the child. For example if
    an overall aim for the child was to develop simple play skills as a social
    skill a termly target may be to 'Play co-operatively and share with my peers during
    structured play activities' the 3 I will try to steps could be

    1. to request lego from an adult during a shared structured play
    session with one of my peers

    2. to share lego with another child with reduced adult
    intervention

    3. to complete above target with different construction
    equipment e.g. stickle bricks or Popoids.


    Obviously,
    as you said, it’s very hard to give specific help without knowing the child and
    I’m sorry the example doesn’t relate specifically to speech and language
    difficulties but we receive a lot of input from a SALT when setting the communication
    targets. Hope this helps.


    Good
    luck


    x


     
  3. Hi Donna

    I work in a very similar situation so thought I would share the targets I've just set myself. I always go for 3 targets, literacy, numeracy and social interaction/communication, and always always go for short term, achievable targets.

    The three I have set recently are:

    Literacy: To form the basis of an "S" when instructed, be this with a pencil, paint, in a sand tray, whatever, but to clearly show a link between the ssss sound and the letter formation.

    Numeracy: To count objects to 8. This could be stacking bricks, counting children, anything.

    Social: To successfully interact with peers and play/lunch times. This is a achievable with an 80% success rate. The young lady I work with rarely interacts with other children positively yet seems to engage with them only physically by pushing them away if they invade "her" space. I've been encouraging sharing skills and turn taking with her and her peers and have seen great steps in the right direction over the last two weeks since she started at the school. These targets are due for review after the October half-term and I have no doubt each will be achieved by then :)

    I hope this helps a little. From my experience I would suggest not over complicating targets, make them simple and have clearly outlined steps that need to be taken to achieve them. Good luck.

    Lottie
     

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