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ideas to do 'review / reflection' please!

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by DAWSONS_STUFF, Aug 10, 2011.

  1. Hi i am trying to put together a list of ways to do reflection/ Review with children as it can get a bit boring,,,
    So for example after child initiated play before the children have dinner
    In small key person groups the children will say what they have been doing / learning in the morning
    One way is to just randomly choose a child's name out of a hat.
    To pretend to phone a child up and ask them what they have been doing etc
    Can you think of any other ideas to stop it getting boring and a way to hold the children's attention etc
    Thanks in advance

     
  2. Hi i am trying to put together a list of ways to do reflection/ Review with children as it can get a bit boring,,,
    So for example after child initiated play before the children have dinner
    In small key person groups the children will say what they have been doing / learning in the morning
    One way is to just randomly choose a child's name out of a hat.
    To pretend to phone a child up and ask them what they have been doing etc
    Can you think of any other ideas to stop it getting boring and a way to hold the children's attention etc
    Thanks in advance

     
  3. If it is boring, why do it? Is it worth it if the children are not engaged? The telephone idea might help, but in the end, if the children are bored I would drop it.
     
  4. These are some planning and review ideas I was given on a course many years ago and they are very easily adapted to be either planning or reviewing. We don't hear every child plan and review aloud we hear say three a session and the others plan either to themselves are with a friend.
    <font face="Times New Roman">Planning and Recall
    Strategies</font>


    <font face="Times New Roman"> </font>1.
    Train


    Children
    line up behind adults and pretend to be a train. Train moves around to each area where adults
    and children talk about the materials in the area. If a child plans to work in that area, he or
    she &ldquo;gets off&rdquo; the train. The train goes
    to the next area.


    <font face="Times New Roman">Variation. Instead of a train, the class pretends to
    move around the room on a boat, car, truck, wagon train etc.</font>


    <font face="Times New Roman">2.
    Riding toy</font>


    Children
    take turns in riding the toy to the area they want to work in.


    <font face="Times New Roman">3.
    Drum or other instrument</font>


    The
    children parade around the room with the leader (a child) playing the
    drum. The leader stops at the area he or
    she wants to work in and gives the drum to the next child in line, who repeats
    the process.


    Adult
    or child plays a rhythmic pattern on the drum or any other instrument. One at a time, children echo the rhythm and
    give their plans.


    <font face="Times New Roman">4.
    Keys</font>


    Children
    pretend to unlock the areas they would like to work in.


    Children
    pretend to start up the car and drive over to the area they would like to work
    in.


    <font face="Times New Roman">5.
    Tent</font>


    Children
    plan or recall in a tent (a blanket draped over a table works well) under a
    table or in any other unusual place.
    (Use this strategy only with children who are very familiar with the room and the materials in it).


    <font face="Times New Roman">Group Games (to decide who will
    plan/recall next)</font>


    <font face="Times New Roman">6.
    Hula Hoop</font>


    Everyone
    holds a hoop marked in one place with a small piece of coloured tape or a
    painted line. Everyone sings a song and
    passes the hoop through their hands. The
    group stops rotating the hoop at the end of the song. The child nearest the mark then takes a turn
    planning or recalling.


    <font face="Times New Roman">7.
    Purse</font>


    Children
    use a purse to go collect something they want to work with or did work with.


    <font face="Times New Roman">8.
    Ball</font>


    Children
    toss the ball to one another. Whoever catches
    the ball is the next person to plan recall.


    <font face="Times New Roman">Variations:


    <font face="Times New Roman">9.
    Alarm Clock</font>


    Children
    pretend that they are sleeping. Teacher
    rings the clock to &ldquo;wake up&rdquo; each child one by one and ask for his or her plan.


    <font face="Times New Roman">10. &ldquo;Simon Says&rdquo;</font>


    Play
    &ldquo;Simon Says&rdquo; (Example: &ldquo;Simon says, if you are going to use the blocks today,
    you may go &hellip;&rdquo;).


    <font face="Times New Roman">11. Balance Beam</font>


    Children
    take turns walking the balance beam &ndash; they can try walking forward, backward or
    sideways. As children get to the end of
    the beam, one by one they tell their plans.


    <font face="Times New Roman">12. String a bead</font>


    As
    each child tells a plan, he or she adds a bead to the string of beads the
    teacher is holding.


    <font face="Times New Roman">13. Paper Clip</font>


    Children
    make a paper clip chain. As they tell
    their plans, they add to the chain.


    <font face="Times New Roman">14. Song or chant</font>


    Adult
    makes up a planning song or chant, for example:


    <font face="Times New Roman">It&rsquo;s planning time</font>


    <font face="Times New Roman">Were eager to go and play</font>


    <font face="Times New Roman">It&rsquo;s planing time, it&rsquo;s
    planning time</font>



    <font face="Times New Roman">Where will you work today?</font>


    <font face="Times New Roman">Variation: Children and adults make up a similar song or chant
    for recall time.</font>


    <font face="Times New Roman">15. Planning Board</font>


    Children
    gather around a large poster depicting the interest areas though drawings,
    magazine pictures or photographs.
    Children can point to, touch, write their names near, or clip a
    clothespin to the picture of the area they choose to work in.


    <font face="Times New Roman">16. Area Cards</font>


    Adult
    creates a flash card set showing all the areas (using drawings, magazine
    pictures or photographs). Children use
    the cards as they discuss where they are going to work or the sequence of areas
    they will work in.


    Adult
    puts area cards face own or places them in a hat or a bag. Adult then draws out a card and asks who
    would like to work in that area and what each child will do there.


    <font face="Times New Roman">17. Pockets</font>


    Adult
    makes a planning board with pockets representing each area. Child puts his symbol in the pocket for the area
    in which he or she is going to work.
    (Pockets can be made by the children from paper, or you can use real
    ones cut from old clothing).


    <font face="Times New Roman">18. Tape recorder</font>


    Children
    take turns using a tape recorder to record their plans.


    At
    recall time, children listen to the plans they made and discuss whether they
    followed their plans or made changes.


    <font face="Times New Roman">19. Clue Game</font>


    At
    recall time, adult says &ldquo;I saw someone using something long, pointed, shiny and
    sharp today. What did that person use? &hellip;
    What area did it come from? &hellip; Who used the material? &hellip; What did you do with the
    material?&rdquo;


    <font face="Times New Roman">20. Hammer a nail</font>


    Teacher
    sketches a simple planning board on a piece of wood. Children hammer a nail in the section showing
    the area where they want to work.
    Styrofoam and golf tees may be used as a &lsquo;low impact&rsquo; alternative.


    <font face="Times New Roman">21. Computer</font>


    Adult
    types in each child&rsquo;s plan as children dictate to them.


    Children
    print out their plans and draw pictures to go with them


    <font face="Times New Roman">22. Flashlight</font>


    Children
    spotlight the area they want to work in.


    Children
    take turns spotlighting one another to indicate who tells their plans next.


    <font face="Times New Roman">23. Tape measure</font>


    As
    the adult holds one end of the tape measure, the children take turns pulling
    the end of the tape to the areas hey are going to work in. Children read tape and pretend to measure how
    far they had to go.


    Adult
    makes a pointer by extending the tape measure several inches and pushing the
    button to keep it extended. Children use
    this to point to areas and objects that are involved in their plans.


    <font face="Times New Roman">24. String or Yarn </font>


    As
    the adult holds one end of a long piece of string or yarn, the children take
    turns stretching their end of the string or yarn to the area they want to work
    in.


    <font face="Times New Roman">25. Tape</font>


    Put
    a piece of tape on the object or area where you want to play


    Children
    can draw small pictures on the tape or they could use the tape to indicate on a
    map or planning/recall board what they did that day.


    <font face="Times New Roman">26. Hats</font>


    Children
    take turns pulling objects (that they have brought from different areas of the
    classroom) out of a hat. As children
    identify the area an object comes from, the adult asks who brought that
    particular object and what they plan to do with it.


    Each
    child wears the &ldquo;planning hat&rdquo; while giving his or her plan.


    2<font face="Times New Roman">7. &ldquo;Feely&rdquo; box</font>


    Adult
    places objects that children used during work time in a box. Children take turns guessing objects by how
    they feel, naming the object, describing how the object was used, recalling
    what they did with it.


    <font face="Times New Roman">28. Boxes</font>


    Adult
    sets out boxes in different sizes. Each
    child finds an object from the interest area where he or she is planning to work
    that fits in one of the boxes.


    Adult
    makes a tunnel out of one or more large boxes.
    Children crawl through the tunnel, and as each child comes out the other
    side, he or she tells the adult a plan and then goes to work.
     
  5. Thanks Sandyjohn for your constructive, positive and very helpful reply
     
  6. any more ideas people?
    thanks in advance

     
  7. mandala1

    mandala1 Occasional commenter

    I'm with Thumbie here. Why do children need to reflect/review? What are the benefits?
     


  8. It is the beginning of developing children's ability to think about their learning. Successful learners are able to think about what they have done and monitor and reflect on their learning. There is a clear link between these skills and attainment. However these metacognitive skills don't develop until the age of 5-7 in most children - yet children can start to be trained in thinking and talking about what they have done. It may not be appropriate (or fun) to do it every day but provides the groundwork for later self-regulation.
     
  9. I have found that at this age you need to catch children right where the learning is happening and use insightful questioning to encourage them to describe and extend what they are doing, and reflect on what they have done. Ask them afterwards and most likely you won't get their best thinking, and on the whole, if you do it in a group the less articulate members just mimic those who are more able to speak at greater length. For those with very short attention spans it is very boring to have to listen to someone else talking, in a way which may not be readily understood about something rather mundane such as playing in the sand and making a sand castle.
     

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