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Ideas greatly appreciated...

Discussion in 'English' started by jenped, Apr 10, 2012.

  1. I have been asked to lead a transition event for 180 Year 6 students in the school hall. It is to last an hour and can be on anything related to the English subject. So I can pretty much do what I want (within reason)!
    However, my mind has gone blank- either due to marking so many Controlled Assessments (holidays, ey?) or the daunting fact that there will be 180 students!
    All the activities I have used previously would not be suitable for such a large group.
    Any advice / ideas would be greatly appreciated.
    Jen
     
  2. sianna

    sianna New commenter

    <h3 style="margin:0cm 0cm 0pt;"><u>MOVING ON - 1</u></h3>




    Activity:


    Talking
    in pairs and groups about themselves





    Teaching
    objectives
    :


    <ul style="margin-top:0cm;">
    <li style="margin:0cm 0cm 0pt;tab-stops:list 36.0pt left 219.75pt;" class="MsoNormal">To establish the confidence of new
    students in their first English lesson.
    <li style="margin:0cm 0cm 0pt;tab-stops:list 36.0pt left 219.75pt;" class="MsoNormal">Listening skills.
    <li style="margin:0cm 0cm 0pt;tab-stops:list 36.0pt left 219.75pt;" class="MsoNormal">Asking questions.
    <li style="margin:0cm 0cm 0pt;tab-stops:list 36.0pt left 219.75pt;" class="MsoNormal">Working in unfamiliar groups.
    <li style="margin:0cm 0cm 0pt;tab-stops:list 36.0pt left 219.75pt;" class="MsoNormal">Writing about how this school
    compares to their primary school and their feelings about changing
    schools.
    [/LIST]




    Content:


    Part
    One:



    <ol start="1" style="margin-top:0cm;">
    <li style="margin:0cm 0cm 0pt;tab-stops:list 36.0pt left 219.75pt;" class="MsoNormal">Seat students in pairs and, if
    possible in fours, with people who have all attended a different primary
    school.
    <li style="margin:0cm 0cm 0pt;tab-stops:list 36.0pt left 219.75pt;" class="MsoNormal">Introduce topic 'myself' and the idea
    of interviewing one another.
    <li style="margin:0cm 0cm 0pt;tab-stops:list 36.0pt left 219.75pt;" class="MsoNormal">Collect a few ideas for questions,
    e.g. Name, hobbies, family (or use question sheet).
    <li style="margin:0cm 0cm 0pt;tab-stops:list 36.0pt left 219.75pt;" class="MsoNormal">Nominate A's and B's, C's and
    D's. A interviews B about
    him/herself and C interviews D.
    <li style="margin:0cm 0cm 0pt;tab-stops:list 36.0pt left 219.75pt;" class="MsoNormal">A and B join with C and D. A and C tell the group in turn what they
    have learned about their partners or introduce their partners to the
    group.
    </ol>

    Part Two:


    <ol start="6" style="margin-top:0cm;">
    <li style="margin:0cm 0cm 0pt;tab-stops:list 36.0pt left 219.75pt;" class="MsoNormal">Write an essay that discusses the
    differences and similarities between their primary school and here.
    Use writing frame enclosed as a basis for this essay.
    <li style="margin:0cm 0cm 0pt;tab-stops:list 36.0pt left 219.75pt;" class="MsoNormal">Discuss topic &lsquo;How does this
    school compare to your primary school?&rsquo;
    <li style="margin:0cm 0cm 0pt;tab-stops:list 36.0pt left 219.75pt;" class="MsoNormal">Look at writing frame and work through
    how to write this essay together on screen or board..
    </ol>




    Resources:


    Question/prompt
    sheet if required


    Writing
    frame

    THey don't have to do any writing - they could do a presentation (in small groups ) or role play ... 'My first day'
    Maybe get them to think back to first day at primary school and compare thoughts feelings with today ...
     
  3. sianna

    sianna New commenter

    MOVING
    ON




    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>[/b]



    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>In
    pairs - with somebody who is from a different school to you - discuss your old
    school.


    Ask
    one another lots of questions.


    Listen to their
    answers ... later you are going to tell
    the rest of the class about your partner!




    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>Example
    questions to help you:


    1. Where was it?


    2. Did you like it?


    3. What did you like best/least about it?


    4. What were the school dinners like? Did you eat them?


    5. Which lesson did you like best/least? Why?


    6. Who was your favourite teacher? Why?


    7. Which teacher did you like least? Why?


    8. Describe the teachers, the school, the
    grounds, the routines, assembly, sports day, etc.


    9. How did you get to school?


    10.
    Who were your friends?


    11.
    What do you miss most about it? Teachers? Friends?
    Special classroom?


    12.
    Describe an interesting event which happened at your old school.



    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>Feedback
    to rest of class



    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>[/b]



    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>Now
    you are going to talk about your new school.



    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>1. How did you feel about coming to school on
    Tuesday?


    2. What did you feel like when you got home at
    the end of the day?


    3. Have you made any new friends yet?


    4. Can you find your way around the
    building?


    5. Tell your partner what you think of it so
    far.


    6. Do you have any brothers or sisters at this
    school?


    7. Has anybody had any strange or interesting
    things happen to them yet?



    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>Feedback
    to rest of class



    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>MOVING
    ON




    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>Writing
    about your old school and new experiences.



    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>Following
    your discussion with your partner and with the rest of the class, you are now
    going to write about yourself, your old school and the experiences you have had
    as a result of starting a new school.



    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>HOW TO DO IT:


    Write
    at least one sentence about each of the following points. Make what you write as interesting as
    possible.



    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>1. Who are you?


    Tell
    me everything there is to know about yourself!


    Describe
    yourself. Describe your family, where
    you live, your likes, dislikes, hobbies, interests, talents. Talk about your friends, pets, holidays,
    ambitions...



    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>2. Your old school


    i) Answers to all the questions your partner
    asked you earlier.


    ii) Your last days at your old school - your
    feelings, things you did, things people said to you, the very last minute of
    the very last day...


    iii) Your feelings during the summer holiday - hopes,
    fears, expectations - about starting a new school.



    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>3. Your new school


    i) How you felt as the holidays came to an end.


    ii) Trying on your new school uniform.


    iii)
    Buying new stationery etc.


    iv) Arriving on the first day.


    v) Finding your way around.


    vi) Meeting new people - friends, teachers etc.



    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>4. The future


    Your
    hopes, fears, expectations, ambitions...


    What
    do you hope to achieve during your time at this school? ( in school and out of
    school - in lessons, sports, clubs, when meeting new people, making new
    friends, getting older ...)



    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>
     
  4. sianna

    sianna New commenter

    FIRST
    DAY AT SCHOOL



    ROGER
    MCGOUGH




    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>A
    millionbillionwillion miles from home



    Waiting
    for the bell to go. (To go where?)



    Why are
    they all so big, other children?



    So
    noisy? So much at home they



    must
    have been born in uniform.



    Lived
    all their lives in playgrounds.



    Spent
    the years inventing games



    that
    don't let me in. Games



    that
    are rough, that swallow you up.




    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>And the
    railings.



    All
    around, the railings.



    Are
    they to keep out wolves and monsters?



    Things
    that carry off and eat children?



    Things
    you don't take sweets from?



    Perhaps
    they're to stop us getting out.



    Running
    away from the lessins. Lessin.



    What
    does a lessin look like?



    Sounds
    small and slimy.



    They
    keep them in the glassrooms.



    Whole
    rooms made out of glass. Imagine.




    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>I wish
    I could remember my name.



    Mummy
    said it would come in useful.



    Like
    wellies. When there's puddles.



    Yellowwellies. I wish she was here.


    I think
    my name is sewn on somewhere.



    Perhaps
    the teacher will read it for me.



    Tea-cher. The one who makes the tea.



    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>
     
  5. sianna

    sianna New commenter

    From
    'Cider with Rosie' by Laurie Lee



    First
    day at school






    The village school at that time provided all the
    instruction we were likely to ask for.
    It was a small stone barn divided by a wooden partition into two rooms
    -The Infants and The Big Ones. There was
    one dame teacher, and perhaps a young girl assistant. Every child in the valley crowding there,
    remained till he was fourteen years old, then was presented to the working
    field or factory with nothing in his head more burdensome than a few nmemonics,
    a jumbled list of wars and a dreamy image of the world's geography. It seemed enough to get by with, in any case;
    and was one up on our poor grandparents.





    This school, when I came to it, was at its
    peak. Universal education and unusual
    fertility had packed it to the walls with pupils. Wild boys and girls from miles around - from
    the outlying farms and half-hidden hovels way us at the ends of the valley -
    swept down each day to add to our numbers, bringing with them strange oaths and
    odours, quaint garments and curious pies.
    They were my first amazed version of any world outside the womanly
    warmth of my family; I didn't expect to
    survive it for long, and I was confronted with it at the age of four.





    The morning came, without any warning, when my
    sisters surrounded me, wrapped me in scarves, tied up my bootlaces, thrust a
    cap on my head, and stuffed a baked potato in my pocket.


    'What's this?' I said.


    'You're starting school today.'


    'I ain't.
    I'm stopping 'ome.'


    'Now, come on, Loll. You're a big boy now.'


    'I ain't.'


    'You are.'


    'Boo-hoo.'


    They picked me up bodily, kicking and bawling and
    carried me to the road.


    'Boys who don't go to school get put into boxes,
    and turn into rabbits, and get chopped up on Sundays.'





    I felt this was overdoing it rather, but I said no
    more after that. I arrived at the school
    just three feet tall and fatly wrapped in my scarves. The playground roared like a rodeo, and the
    potato burned through my thigh. Old
    boots, ragged stockings, torn trousers and skirts, went skating and skidding
    around me. The rabble closed in; I was
    encircled; grit flew in my face like shrapnel.
    Tall girls with frizzled hair, and huge boys with sharp elbows, began to
    *** me with hideous interest. They
    plucked at my scarves, spun me round like a top, screwed my nose, and stole my
    potato.





    I was rescued at last by a gracious lady- the
    sixteen year old junior teacher - who boxed a few ears and dried my face and
    led me off the The Infants. I spent that
    first day picking holes in paper and then went home in a smouldering temper.





    'What's the matter, Loll? Didn't he like it at
    school, then?'


    'They never gave me the present!'


    'Present? What present?'


    'They said they'd give me a present.'


    'Well, now, I'm sure they didn't.'


    'They did! They said: "You're Laurie Lee,
    ain't you? Well, just you sit there for the present." I sat there all day but I never got it. I ain't going back there again!'





    But after a week I felt like a veteren and grew as
    ruthless as anyone else. Somebody had
    stolen my baked potato, so I swiped somebody else's apple. The Infant Room was packed with toys such as
    I'd never seen before - coloured shapes and rolls of clay, stuffed birds and
    men to paint. Also a frame of counting
    beads which our young teacher played like a harp, leaning her bosom against our
    faces and guiding our wandering fingers&hellip;



     
  6. Thank you for your response Sianna.
     

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