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Ideas for the 1st lesson with secondary classes??

Discussion in 'New teachers' started by anon1369, Sep 2, 2011.

  1. So I start my NQT year next week and I'm now in utter panic mode, as I'm sure most of you are!!
    I'm thinking of using the first lesson with each of my classes as an introduction and obviously there will be some admin tasks like handing out books, getting them sorted etc. I am planning on using this time to state my expectations and then get them to write 'my rules' in their books.
    I was also going to do something to help me get to know their names and a bit more about them but I'm stuck for ideas. Any suggestions?
    Also anything else I could do to fill up the full lesson?
    All ideas much appreciated. What will you be doing?
     
  2. So I start my NQT year next week and I'm now in utter panic mode, as I'm sure most of you are!!
    I'm thinking of using the first lesson with each of my classes as an introduction and obviously there will be some admin tasks like handing out books, getting them sorted etc. I am planning on using this time to state my expectations and then get them to write 'my rules' in their books.
    I was also going to do something to help me get to know their names and a bit more about them but I'm stuck for ideas. Any suggestions?
    Also anything else I could do to fill up the full lesson?
    All ideas much appreciated. What will you be doing?
     
  3. allotmentlady

    allotmentlady New commenter

    Hi
    I start my NQT in Secondary but English next week as well eek. As well as the admin stuff. I was thinking of doing some kind of skills audit questonaire.. to know where they think they are in terms of knowledge and I am also going to get all my classes doing a piece of creative writing, thinking that I can use this for progression at a later stage.. some kind of general knowledge test so you can see where their knowledge lies? I have read lots of conflicting advice but I think for secondary you have to some kind of proper work in the lessons to set the right tone.

    GOOD LUCK (I know I need it [​IMG]
     
  4. GloriaSunshine

    GloriaSunshine New commenter

    I would suggest teaching rather than making them write out rules. (consider how many times each child would be writing these if every class teacher did this in the first week. You could get them to write up some notes or answer some questions on your first topic in their books so that you can explain how you want work set out and so on. May be topic vocabulary matching game, some explanation, class discussion, a chart in their books and a quick quiz? Then in the next lesson, you could remind them of science lab rules before a practical or whatever. I don't teach science so not really sure, but I would start with a real lesson, not fillers.
     
  5. Get your expectations and routines in place, taught and practised for the first few lessons... or you will be playing catch-up all year...
     
  6. Yeah I plan on doing the ground rules, but really wanted to to a quick fun activity...I want them to leave my (maths ) classroom feeling good about themselves - but am thinking it shouldn't be a game as my HoD said he will be dropping by...
     
  7. jarndyce

    jarndyce Occasional commenter

    If you want to learn their names, go on SIMS or whatever your school has and print out their photos.



    Once I've made the children copy down my rules, and spoken to them about the content of the course, my first 'full' lesson with each group is going to be a silent writing activity (which I can use to assess which level they're really working at!).
     
  8. Here's a useful exercise (below) on the riots I got from www.homeworkclub.co.uk. It can be put on a whiteboard and answers are at the bottom so kids can work in silence (if you wish) and correct their own answers. This leaves you free to walk around and make your presence felt .. (gently). Then you can discuss the topics if you wish.
    http://www.schoolsproject.co.uk/mts/lf/rtstemp1.pdf -
    No use for maths or science, I'm afraid - but there's an easier version for primary.
    Start with ttight control and good habits ... but I'd avoid yet another '"copy down the rules" session. They get this elsewhere and I promise it makes not a blind bit of difference in the long run. In reality, everyone knows what the basic rules are, and yours will be just the same. Whether or not they obey them has everything to do with you (and your Head of Dept) and nothing to do with what they write on the first page of their jotter. So why be so predictable? You ain't there as an entertainer, despite what the Head of Ofsted may say, but avoid being unimaginative. Make an effort to be a little bit different.
     
  9. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    Write your rules in big letters on a large sheet and have it stuck to the wall at the front of your classroom. Take them through them quicly and keep pointing to them at regular intervals during the lesson and each subsequent one.
    Get them doing a proper lesson immediately. Don't mess about - make it a well planned, well structured lesson with clear, achievable LO and a clear assessment focus, so that by the end of the lesson they can easily see what they've learnt.
    Your classes go away knowing you don't waste time, that you teach proper lessons and don't let them waste time. What more could you want?
     
  10. Hi
    I started my NQT year last year doing secondary English. I started off with getting them into alphabetical order (KS3 - lined them up at the back of the class and got them to do it themselves without talking & timed them with a prize for fastest class, then this was the seating plan for the first half term at least; KS4 - displayed seating plan on whiteboard & put them straight in). Then spent first 15/20 minutes going through my rules, expectations, etc re: lessons and homework.
    After that I handed out sweets (I know!! but there is method in the madness) and got them to go through the senses - look only, write down adjectives; then feel sweet, smell, taste and listen - works best if in crinkly wrapper!!. You get an idea of their language capabilities.
    I then asked them to write a couple of sentences about each sense - again judges their capabilities in punctuation and sentence structure.
    Homework (start as you mean to go on!) was to write out some paragraphs (which I graded to give me a bit of a benchmark) on describing a place they knew well using the same skills.
    I found all ages enjoyed this, and it's great to remember the sweets each time you set them off writing about something. Remainder of lesson used to hand out books, introduce topics, etc.
    If anyone would like a copy of my powerpoint presentation with rules/expectations, etc I'm more than happy to supply. Just send me an email - anenglishnqt@yahoo.co.uk.
    Good luck everyone - I love teaching (just a shame about the paperwork.parents/SMT/ marking!!).
    Oh, and I recommend Phil Beadle's How To Teach book for inspiration, and Frank Chalk's It's Your Time Your Wasting book to make you realise that there are worse schools out there!!!
     
  11. allotmentlady

    allotmentlady New commenter

    Hi
    Thanks for this.. I have sent you an email asking for powerpoint !
    TES.. I would not be without it
    Thanksx
     
  12. neeny468

    neeny468 New commenter

    Hi CrazyChemist,

    I started my science NQT last year. Someone gave me a lesson called 'draw me a scientist' I think it was from the tes - I can email you what I did if you want msg me. I would agree with the previous poster about not getting them to write out all the rules. My rules spiel was way too much last year, especially with the older students. I am going to keep it short and sweet this year, sort out the entrance expectation and then just get on with it, followed by the exit expectations. I realise it is important to get the rules clear but if they have had 7 lessons already this week that start with different expectations it will probably just be a waste of time. My rules are on the wall and at the end of the day the kids know how they *should* be behaving. I will deal with issues when they arise to reiterate the written rules.

    good luck :)

    N
     
  13. Hi
    I have emailed you asking for your Power Point also.
    This thread has given me a load of ideas for this coming week. [​IMG]
    Thanks all.
     
  14. Brilliant advice, thank you anenglishnqt!
     
  15. excellent advice from Middlemarch. Get straight in with a well structured lesson - with loads of opportunities to impress you. I would go further and say dispense with the rule thing altogether. They know bloody fine well how they should behave. Discipline anyone who doesnt comply completely. They know fine well they are pushing it. Never give the benefit of the doubt. They are pushing you...
     
  16. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    I'm glad someone finally agreed. All these 'ideas' are the work of the devil if they're not properly structured lessons which start you on the scheme of work.
     

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