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Ideal shoes found for Head teachers on feet all day!

Discussion in 'Headteachers' started by dusty67, Jun 12, 2011.

  1. dusty67

    dusty67 New commenter

    I love fitflops and wear them during summer in school when I'm wearing long trousers that cover most of my foot. I do worry they are a bit unprofessional looking at time though. Which ones do you wear?
     
  2. 'Roma'- to be fair, him indoors did raise an eye brow when I said aren't these stylish and they are a bit square. Are you in the flip flop fancy ones? Quite risqué and cheeky-good for you! Cloggs website have sale.
     
  3. nomad

    nomad Star commenter

    Having read the latest communications from DfE, OfSTED and the local authority newsletter to schools (and on a Sunday morning too), I have decided I should be wearing these...
    [​IMG]
     
  4. dusty67

    dusty67 New commenter

    just looked at those on line, and they do have more foot coverage than the ones I wear. Never seen them bfroe, so I'll be looking out for them.

    I wear the electra in gold, but I want some of the sparkly rokkit ones!

    Or the Fiorella
     
  5. dusty67

    dusty67 New commenter

    Nomad,

    How do you insert a picture? Just failed miserably in my last post! I'm using safari on a mac.
     
  6. I own 3 pairs of fitflops. Love them!
     
  7. I live in fitflops, but I'm only a classroom teacher - hope that's allowed! ;) I recommend the boots for winter. Very expensive, but they last brilliantly, and the styles are getting much smarter.
     
  8. Brkenstocks............sandals for the summer, clogs for the autumn/winter -maybe even the shoes for the deep winter... they are shaped to the foot, instep supported, toes guided, made of cork (lined with soft leather) so well insulated,can be worn from waking to going to bed without any strain on calves, or feeling of tired feet. Can maintain them easily, can even rebuild them if so wished, the most comfortable, practical and enjoyable footwear I have tried so far -
     
  9. Oh my golly gosh!!!!!
    Open toed sandals or even thongs (as the down under dwellers refer)!!!!!
    1) Heath and safety, very poor...trampled tootsies
    2) Very Hippy Trippy, if my wife's are anything to go by (sparkling purple), Glastonbury Festival is in a (soon to be) muddy field in Pilton, not a classroom.
    I wear nice brown Trickers brogues. Ideal out of town, go with most clothes, last for ever, support your arches, fit like a glove, are smart, should be worn by all female heads - with tweed twin set! (that's what Michael would want) and set the right example for our profession.
    Oh yes, they make a nice loud noise, bound to grab attention when I walk out!
     
  10. ..and then there is the spiked heel of course ( have worked for a few of them in the past!) Shoes are fascinating- say something about a person perhaps?
     
  11. what is this about open-toed sandals? I am primary so trampled tootsies is an occasional hazard but not enough to counter the pleasure of walking almost barefoot. THe birkenstock is actually quite elegant and doesn't fall off your feet. when running and jumping and dancing. Besides when the feet breathe the minds breathes and maybe primary and secondary theses days have become slaves to the idea of education as a business. The complete tosh (and impracticality) of men wearing suits in primary as somehow conferring greater respect and a sense of uniformity and purpose. I think scandinavian schools would laugh their socks off ( if they were wearing them and not Birkenstocks of course).


    The increasing pressure to remove idiosyncracies and individual styles is a denial of education - the opportunities to discuss real life, its dynmaics, its choices and its consequences and to live wth them and share in real time the gneration of a constantly fresh sense of the present rather than a stale past. Unfortunately it is a common feature of schooling. Dress codes, uniform policies, homework policies and home-school agreements (which are never a negotiated agreement but an imposed contract) all reflect the same thing- we english are not comfortable with open-toes !! So before you all tell me to put a sock in it - I'm off. Isn't the TES great to chat without having to take minutes, agree actions, costs and evaluation criteria !!
     
  12. There is conformity everywhere. In Steiner schools there is an unspoken uniform of cloth kits and hand made shoes and endemic snobbery about that. The curriculum is pretty rigid and not at all sensitive to new ideas either. I am sure Scandinavia is just the same. Wherever you go people conform to whatever is going on, to feel belonging. Don't knock UK schools, they are full of excited learners and great teachers who can wear what they like. A sparkle in the eye and a laughing, busy classroom is more important than a cool shoe or a moral high ground.
     
  13. EXACTLY ...........I agree drac, but its not moral high ground its frustration at the tide of jolly rot. style over substance spin over sincerity. I don't mean to stand on a moral high ground but there is a lot of bullying goes on in UK schools under the guise of managing change etc. Of special measures, of whole school policies, of corporate identities. I know full well the ins and outs of Waldorf Education, it was one of the great streams of thought that nourished the river of my own teaching life, along with many others. In practice there is its own conformity as you say, but there is a lot we can each learn from each other.

    OUr youngest children and thier schools have become such high stakes in the gambles of others that I think it is beholden (mmmm maybe the wrong word here) of the common teacher to speak out for the child and its ways of learning and seeing, and quite often that child points a finger and sees us naked, in our suits and policies. More so in the UK because we do set ourselves up (education secretaries and academy heads at least) as little emperors.
     
  14. No they don't! Kids don't see anything except the warmth and engagement you give them. I have seen suited and booted seemingly straight laced teachers bring the world to life on an old rug on a magic carpet ride and equally a person who talks the talk, has the chrystals and tie dye being totally offensive in the classroom. What you wear is irrelevant to children. Steiner schools- well, I could say alot! Fair deal of poor screening of new teachers, fanatics, crazy ideas about ICT and belief in a dead bloke who was just trying to get kids to be kids and not young adults. I have observed Steiner lessons and mainstream state schools- in both there is merit in charismatic Steiner teacher lessons at times. There is a great deal of shocking practice in private education with less scrutiny than there should be. However, the thinking schools which are taking learning forward in exciting and innovative ways are mainstream British schools not stuck in outdated philosophy. If you are bullied that is wrong bit it says nothing about a whole system.
     
  15. thanks for the reply. No I am not and haven't ever been bullied. I agree about clothes being irrelevant and so pointed out the nonsense of schools insisiting on suited teachers in primary school, on over emphasis on uniforms and the insistence on policies to determine every possible outcome or deviation etc There always have been innovative schools in the UK but there has perhaps never been such a minute control over as many details of how to work with children.- OFSTED even policies the nonsense - eg home school contracts particularly reflect this cynical top down approach The OFSTED apparatus (and I have been one), the school SMT culture, the m yths that we have swallowed about the needs for contnous improvement, underpinned by continuous cycles of lesson observation, short term initiatives in the hands of short-armed steering groups etc. SO I think yes there are many small details which say a lot about our whole system.


    By the way I don't know why you go on about crystals and tie die.. Perhaps you are talking from experience- but it is an extreme caricature. I agree i00% that is warmth and engagement, firmness, affection, clarity, confusion, shariing directions and enquiries etc that bring about the relationship within which learning not only fourishes but is recognised to flourish. THe 'teaching' agenda' the suited booted, policied and OFSTED'e agenda seem to dominate too much. Such taht our schools have had to apply for license to be creative.

    Your critique of steiner schools may be from your own expereince and there are extrapolations to truths that can be made from the examples you quote. However whether some dead bloke gave them direction doesn't matter so much (or christianity would be irrelevant too wouldn't it) but that there is view of the child which can help us remember the learning agenda (Montessori, Dewy, Bruner, Gussin Paliey, Reggio Emilia and many other examples remind us of this constantly in schools and classroms that are laboratories of Shared expereinces, enquiries and celebrations.

    If it takes Steiiner schools to offer us pause for though re. the early effects of technology, of not learning to read before we can speak well, of respecting the child's autonomy and play, of valuing relationships deeply and of having a philosophical and reflective core approach as a teacher that is not at the mercy of soundbite policies and that cannot be held hostage to fashion or to governments pirating the moonlight for their easy causes- then good for Waldorf. The world needs variety. (I am in mainstream ed by the way)
     
  16. Suits are just a pair of trousers and a jacket...They can be as bland or flamboyant as the wearer chooses, as is any set of clothing and they are very practical, light weight and roomy! Jeans, for example, are about as humdrum it gets, everyone from grandads to toddlers wear em!
    I always find those that believe they are radical in their dress are rather stereotypical and conform to the tribe they consider themselves a member of, but refer to this sub sect as "individual"
    As far as I'm concerned staff can wear what they like as long as their boobs, bum crack, underwear and other personal body parts and apparel are concealed!
     
  17. I live in my fitflops, have the shoes and flipflop style for the summer and winter boots. Amazing, don't wear the open toe ones as am a science teacher health and safety but the others are fine. Also have issues with plantar facitious( not sure how to spell) never have an issue when where my fitpflops, but other shoes ouch!
     
  18. There's a fitflop for medical people called a Gogh pro - might be good for you. I must get a commission. Let's keep this to shoes. Trousers are a whole other ball game (excuse pun)..
     
  19. Working in Primary - especially EY, I have seen too many children stroking/poking/scratching/picking at nail polish on toes to ever wear anything open-toed! Even patent shoes are too much of a draw for the magpie-like tendencies of the average 4 yr old!
     
  20. Toe wigs are something to check for as you get older and launch into a sandal with gay abandon this season. I saw a neighbour sanding their feet recently too. Yes, keep unsightly tootsies locked up please or adopt a proper teacher look- sock inside sandal. One good thing about 4 year olds is that they don't care if you have no style.
     

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