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ICT Teacher Interview - 'IF' Statement lesson ideas.

Discussion in 'Computing and ICT' started by dhurst, Feb 6, 2011.

  1. dhurst

    dhurst New commenter

    Hi all,
    I have an interview next week and would like some help/advice/ideas on developing a good lesson on IF statements using excel 2007.
    I have a few ideas for a good Starter/Plenary,but would like some advice on how to make the perfect IF statement lesson.

    Its a 30 minute lesson so the activies have to be quite short with some sort of assessment in there.

    Any helf would be great
     
  2. dhurst

    dhurst New commenter

    Hi all,
    I have an interview next week and would like some help/advice/ideas on developing a good lesson on IF statements using excel 2007.
    I have a few ideas for a good Starter/Plenary,but would like some advice on how to make the perfect IF statement lesson.

    Its a 30 minute lesson so the activies have to be quite short with some sort of assessment in there.

    Any helf would be great
     
  3. what year is this for?
    I'd probably give them a basic mark book, with a student's target, and a list of say, 5 number values of test results (all with the same maximum marks available for simplicity), and put an Average at the end. they can then make an IF statement to say IF the average is equal to or greater than their target, say "target met"... otherwise say "below target"...
    Then this would lead onto them creating nested IF statements, where if it is above say, 90, then write A, if it is above 80 write B, if it is above 70 write C etc...
    a bit difficult to get into half an hour, but possible i think with a good gcse class.

    alternatively, if you're worried about time or it is a year 7-9 class make a multiple choice quiz with some basic drop down list validation - and use IF statements to say whether the answer they give is correct or not. add a countIF at the end to see how many 'Correct!" statements are returned - and make the extension to work out how to say if they got over 70% correct to give a further congratulatory message - or below 70% to say they need to revise the topic more.

    Paypal me 10% of your first year's salary if either of these get you the job.
     
  4. tonyuk

    tonyuk Occasional commenter

    Or how about a football league table using if so if so many goal differences then extra points or something similar and use real football teams normally hooks boys in!
     
  5. I make a really simple quiz, with the IF being used to work out if it's correct or not. This is for year 8 who I have half hour lessons with.



    =IF B5="blue","correct","wrong"



    sort of thing, and then they can use =countif() to work out total points (I get htem to to three simple questions, maybe "what colour is the sky meant to be?").
     
  6. yeah yeah, with some brackets in there!
     
  7. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    Students have to work out correct answers to a short series of questions/problems, IF statements tell them if their answers are correct. They investigate the IF statements (make sure you protect the cells from editing/deletion), then they apply the same principle to some questions of their own.

    By the way, I've seen a teacher gain an ICT job from a sample lesson where the students didn't use the computers at all. Maybe worth thinking about.
     
  8. JaquesJaquesLiverot

    JaquesJaquesLiverot Established commenter

    In my experience, kids respond much better to things that don't look like spreadsheets - i.e. that don't contain too many numbers.
    Try a game (e.g. snap), a fruit machine, or (as I've probably said many times before), something like this:
    http://www.warwickshire-sss.org.uk/subject/ict/miscellaneous/die.html
    Don't bother with the button, just press F9. Give them the formulae for the number - e.g. =int(rand()*6)+1 - and discuss the rules for when the spots appear, e.g.
    - the top-left spot appears IF the number is two or more
    - the top-right spot appears IF the number is greater than two
    - etc.
    A lower case 'n' in Webdings makes a good spot, and there's an =isodd() function (in newer versions of Excel) for the middle spot, e.g. =if(isodd(a1),"n","").
    It might be a bit much for 30 minutes (but surely they wouldn't expect students to finish anything in that time? Maybe they could design the rules on paper, rather than actually making it?), but it's got everything you need for a spreadsheet model - a variable, some rules, and the opportunity to tart it up to make it suitable for the audience.
     
  9. hoof_hearted

    hoof_hearted New commenter

    I do a picture quiz. Basically they distort a celebrity in a photo editing program, then have a title Who is it? The image is then in A1 and the statement in A3 would say =If(A2="Eminem","right","wrong") Idea grabbed from the mini pops pixel pop group quiz going round some years ago :)
     
  10. JaquesJaquesLiverot

    JaquesJaquesLiverot Established commenter

    If you're doing this, then remember to point out that they'll need to spell the answer correctly and get the capitals in the right place. You could expand it further by using validation to create a multiple-choice question - or just make sure you're not including any questions about Icelandic glaciers.
     

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