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ICT Progress in lessons and over unit - HELP needed please!

Discussion in 'Computing and ICT' started by atmosworld, Feb 18, 2012.

  1. atmosworld

    atmosworld New commenter

    Hi

    I really need help with something. Any help would be welcomed.

    My question - should information be provide to the students on how to progress through the levels (4,5,6,7 etc) for that individual lesson or over the course of a unit?...

    At the moment I show the students how to make progress in that particular lesson e.g. If they are making a leaflet i will provide details on what they need to do to get a level 4/5/6- i will also have an example of a level 6 (or the highest level for that group). HOWEVER, when SLT came into my room and asked my students how they could make progress over last terms levels - they did not know how to answer. When I asked about this, SLT said the progress must be over a 'unit' or 'term' rather than just one lesson.

    Each student does have a progress sheet for each unit (like APP sheet) - but it does not give enough details for a student to know about requirements for a single piece of work.

    Is it possible to fit both into a lesson - I can see myself spending 10 min of every lesson just talking about progress. How do other people do it? Any suggestions would really help. I am getting a little worked up over this.

    One more thing...do you talk about progress before the starter or after the lesson starter?

    Many thanks
     
  2. atmosworld

    atmosworld New commenter

    Hi

    I really need help with something. Any help would be welcomed.

    My question - should information be provide to the students on how to progress through the levels (4,5,6,7 etc) for that individual lesson or over the course of a unit?...

    At the moment I show the students how to make progress in that particular lesson e.g. If they are making a leaflet i will provide details on what they need to do to get a level 4/5/6- i will also have an example of a level 6 (or the highest level for that group). HOWEVER, when SLT came into my room and asked my students how they could make progress over last terms levels - they did not know how to answer. When I asked about this, SLT said the progress must be over a 'unit' or 'term' rather than just one lesson.

    Each student does have a progress sheet for each unit (like APP sheet) - but it does not give enough details for a student to know about requirements for a single piece of work.

    Is it possible to fit both into a lesson - I can see myself spending 10 min of every lesson just talking about progress. How do other people do it? Any suggestions would really help. I am getting a little worked up over this.

    One more thing...do you talk about progress before the starter or after the lesson starter?

    Many thanks
     
  3. LinW2010

    LinW2010 New commenter

    I do both - each unit of work is a moodle course, and at the top of that it says clearly what each level will achieve over the unit. Then for each lesson I'll put up objectives and a level for each - e.g. complete questions - level 3, explain how model works - level 4, explain advantages - level 5. These are usually on the assignment hand-in point on moodle as well.
    That way each student should be able to know where they are (cos it's written on their folders), their target (ditto), and how to get there, both in the lesson and in the unit.
    I talk about progress then as I explain what they're doing, and at the end of each unit they write up self assessment - what did you think of the unit, what did you learn, how well did you learn, how can you do better? and I'll respond with their latest level and feedback/targets.
    I love moodle!
     
  4. atmosworld

    atmosworld New commenter

    Hi, I like you idea of moodle. My old school used it, but ny new one are inthe old days of paper handouts and getting the students to print off work for marking.

    How far do you go with the levels? e.g. if creating a charts would you simply say: Level 4 - made bar charts, Level 5 - Inc title and correct axis, Level 6 - made chart looks professional etc. or would you give more details. I only ask because I had a student who produced charts with titles and axis and self assessed at a level 5 - however the charts were incorrect so i gave him a level 4 - but he argueed that he did everything on the mark sheet for a level 5!

    I guess you could write a book out for each level - but where do you stop? What is enough information?

    ps. I loved moodle :)
     
  5. LinW2010

    LinW2010 New commenter

    For the lesson - the shorter version. For moodle unit summary usually a rehash of all the APP phrases that apply. For moodle assignment hand-in - somewhere between the two.

    My school was in the paper era when I started last year, I'm gradually winning them over to moodle - so much easier to keep track of who's done what and for both parties to see the feedback from marking. At the end of the unit when the students have done the self evaluation and I've given them their grade and targets I print out a user report to put in their folders.

    Not to mention the trees we save! Have to make conscious effort to get the kids printing out things like spreadsheets though, looking at printing options. But they love seeing whether the work has been handed in right, and they've put their own icons on their profiles. The forums are useful for sharing ideas, but we turned off the instant messaging!

    It just gives the kids that degree of independence, and means I can provide a quick easy link to all the resources. It also means if anyone questions the kids on how they can get to next level and they say they don't know, I can point out where they skip past it every lesson ;)
     

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