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I want to teach like this!

Discussion in 'Mathematics' started by brookes, Aug 8, 2011.

  1. But I need your help. I love this video from one of my favourite bloggers, Dan Meyer:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BlvKWEvKSi8
    has anyone got any ideas for taking this approach with "Percentages"? I'm thinking learning objectives to do with finding percentages of a quantity; expressing X as percentage of Y; percentage increase and decrease; reverse percentage change and simple and compound interest.
     
  2. But I need your help. I love this video from one of my favourite bloggers, Dan Meyer:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BlvKWEvKSi8
    has anyone got any ideas for taking this approach with "Percentages"? I'm thinking learning objectives to do with finding percentages of a quantity; expressing X as percentage of Y; percentage increase and decrease; reverse percentage change and simple and compound interest.
     
  3. Great. TED is good for other videos too, but Dan Meyer is great
     
  4. Love it! [​IMG]
     
  5. Many thanks for sharing the link and I really liked his use of the video of the container filling with water! What a great motivation for wanting to apply some maths rather than waiting for it to fill.


    I liked a problem that I came across a couple of years ago from (I think) Bowland that was about building houses in Africa from re-cyled drinks bottles. The lessons notes recommended showing the picture, having some drinks bottles and tape measures and leaving the pupils to come up with their own questions that they wanted answering. They are used to this type of open ended task in other subjects but not so much in maths.


    One thing that I tried a little bit of last year was getting pupils to write their own maths stories about a picture/short video. One session produced some things close to what you were after Brookes and involved a short video clip I took of a motorbike using my iPhone. Some wrote a short story about a distance/time graph, speed and fuel consumption, whilst a couple of groups actually did buying the motorbike and worked with getting a load/repayments/interest. I wasn't sure how it would all work out but was pleasantly surprised at the results. Hope that helps!
     
  6. Perhaps I should start a new thread about this but... I've been reflecting on some of the reading of research I've done in recent months - Jo Boaler, Malcolm Swan, RME, Dan Meyer etc and how there are some very similar elements to the improvements they suggest to how we teach maths. At first I feel very inspired. And then I feel frustrated and impatient. Why isn't there the funding and leadership for a group of us, say twenty, to get a sabbatical and spend a year or so creating a scheme of work for the whole curriculum which draws together the very best ideas and resources?
     
  7. I've been reading similar things for the past year or so and I agree, there is a lot of common ground between the people you mention Brookes. The Swan materials that were produced for sixth forms are good but don't quite hit the right spot for secondary.


    In many ways, Ma1 has come up more in exams but the text book writers still do things in the same way with the carefully graded exercises. To an extent, perhaps it's down to the majority of maths teachers these days wanting to teach that way rather than allowing a little more freedom for pupils and trusting them a little more to discuss things.


    On one of Dan Meyer's blog entries, he made the point that in the US there have been attempts to do more of the type of work he is doing but school districts still tended to buy books following the more traditional approach.


    To be fair, some of the work produced the the National Strategies was going along the right lines. I think in pockets there is plenty of material out there but as ever, the problem is with finding it and putting it into some sort of coherent whole. I suspect that commercially, no one is going to do it as it would be a very bold and risky move.


    As I mentioned, Dan himself is now working as a subcontractor for Pearson Education so if that proves successful then perhaps more materials will be gathered together.
     

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