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"I want to pick my pieces, I know best"

Discussion in 'Music' started by princess_moose, Feb 4, 2011.

  1. I have a group of 5 sixth form students studying a BTEC Level 3 course, despite not having done music for GCSE/BTEC Level .
    I arranged for them to have singing lessons (except 1 who plays guitar) and after 4 lessons, some have had less for various reasons, they are already moaning about not picking their own songs straight away. I have tried to explain why building a solid technique etc is important but they just don't seem to 'get it', and with the next part of their course heavily based on performing, I am sick of wasting so much time with them whining about it.
    Does anyone have any good tips or comments to bash them down with? I know it's partly down to their lack of any music classroom lessons for years but it still drives me mad!
     
  2. I have a group of 5 sixth form students studying a BTEC Level 3 course, despite not having done music for GCSE/BTEC Level .
    I arranged for them to have singing lessons (except 1 who plays guitar) and after 4 lessons, some have had less for various reasons, they are already moaning about not picking their own songs straight away. I have tried to explain why building a solid technique etc is important but they just don't seem to 'get it', and with the next part of their course heavily based on performing, I am sick of wasting so much time with them whining about it.
    Does anyone have any good tips or comments to bash them down with? I know it's partly down to their lack of any music classroom lessons for years but it still drives me mad!
     
  3. jonowen

    jonowen Occasional commenter

    Hi Princess,
    I know exactly where you are coming from and you MUST tell them you are the expert and there is no debate. I had 2 (they were younger) who wanted to sing but flitted about wasting their time and mine so I said "Here are 2 xylophone pieces which you will learn for the exam in X months' time" and I went away on a course the next week leaving the instruments set up for them, with the music in their folders, and instructions for their supervision. Today I was back one pupil was present, the other was absent and the present girl performed to an acceptable standard! (thank goodness!!) I was taking a gamble here with lesser-able pupils, but I was pleasantly surprised (as was the pupil). I think so many of them are used to being spoon-fed and cannot organise themselves - don't give them too much choice - maybe it is beyond them, which perhaps they are too "macho" to admit to?
    That's not our fault.................
    [​IMG]
     
  4. I have had similar issues with GCSE pupils. I usually explain to them the mark they would get if they do the piece they want and the mark they will get if they follow guidance - it usually works. I am increasingly coming across pupils who want to ignore the exam board instructions and think that they know better than I do. I had some singers who took quite a while to accept that it would be very unwise if they all sang the same melody for the whole of the song except the last line as their ensemble performance.
     

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