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I want to do a PGCE but don't want to lose financial security I have now

Discussion in 'Thinking of teaching' started by Joanne2009, Dec 14, 2010.

  1. HI,
    I work part time, for the NHS, as a Biomedical Scientist (14 years experience). I would love a career change to teaching science at Secondary level but I do not want to lose the financial security that my present job pays me as I have 2 children and a mortgage!
    I am aware that I can do the GTP and get a salary but what worries me is not being able to find a job a the end of the course. Should I not be able to get a teaching job in the future I would have given up my NHS job and be unemloyed. This is constantly putting me off applying for a PGCE.
    Is there anyway I can do the PGCE without giving up my NHS job until after I secure a teaching post??
    I am also planning on doing GCSE and Advanced Science just to refresh my memory and bring me up to date with what is happening in the subjects these days.
    I have volunteered as a STEM ambassador for schools for the last 7 years so I can use that to support my application. I also have a BSc Hons degree and MSc in Science.
    Thanks
    Jo
     
  2. HI,
    I work part time, for the NHS, as a Biomedical Scientist (14 years experience). I would love a career change to teaching science at Secondary level but I do not want to lose the financial security that my present job pays me as I have 2 children and a mortgage!
    I am aware that I can do the GTP and get a salary but what worries me is not being able to find a job a the end of the course. Should I not be able to get a teaching job in the future I would have given up my NHS job and be unemloyed. This is constantly putting me off applying for a PGCE.
    Is there anyway I can do the PGCE without giving up my NHS job until after I secure a teaching post??
    I am also planning on doing GCSE and Advanced Science just to refresh my memory and bring me up to date with what is happening in the subjects these days.
    I have volunteered as a STEM ambassador for schools for the last 7 years so I can use that to support my application. I also have a BSc Hons degree and MSc in Science.
    Thanks
    Jo
     
  3. There are part time pgce's - I only know of the Open Uni but there are probably other uni's offering science. However, from my recollection the guy I met on the OU course still had to do his teaching practices full time.
     
  4. Nottingham Uni have part time courses but the year was split rather than a week-check with them?
    PGCE's are hectic as hell and I would not want money or kids on my mind unless you can switch to weekend BMS.
    Even after you complete your course you run the risk of not finding a teaching post for a while (week? or a year?) yet alone in the same city.
    Look at funding - Buraries are not even known yet but the grants and loans are. You might be able to get funding to help your children out while you study.
    In that situation I would wait and save up enough for two years or fall back on your BMS with an agency after your PGCE until you find a teaching post.
    I hope it works out for you whatever you choose.
     
  5. chicabonita

    chicabonita New commenter

    I wouldn't have thought so unless your present job is willing to offer you a sabbatical so that after a year you could go back to it. Most people get a job during the PGCE year and if you haven't by the June you'd know you could return to the NHS job.

     
  6. mmm...Milk

    mmm...Milk New commenter

    Is that most people who are going to get a job will get one during thier PGCE? competing against the 1/3 of 2009 NQTs who haven't started thier Induction, the more than half of the 2010 who haven't and then 2011 who are going to start looking? Job prospects very, very poor in teaching.
    Personally, unless you really really hate your job, I would stay put until there are jobs to go to. Right now, they need to stop training teachers.
     
  7. chicabonita

    chicabonita New commenter

    Sorry, was referring back to when I did mine. You're quite right, the job market is VERY different now.
    Check out the situation local to you and decide based on that. If the financial security is very important then wait until the job situation is better, as mmmmilk says.
     
  8. Relevant school experience is one of the main aspects of an application that initial teacher training (ITT) providers will consider, so you are right to see this as an important step towards gaining an interview.
    ITT providers will usually expect applicants interested in teaching at primary school level to have at least two weeks of classroom experience (whether observational, in an assisting/teaching capacity, or both).
    Your current experience as a voluntary tutor, as well as your experience as a young leader in the Brownies, will certainly help to strengthen your application, as they show your commitment to working with children over a long period of time. If you can also add the 15 days of classroom experience in a local primary school, you should be able to provide evidence of substantial and recent experience in the area where you wish to teach, which will help to make that part of your application particularly impressive.
    You should also look on the TDA website www.tda.gov.uk and the graduate teacher training registry website www.gttr.ac.uk. Both provide useful information about how to complete your application, as well as highlighting the sort of things that ITT providers will be looking for.
    I hope that you are able to gain the classroom experience you are after and that you go on to have an enjoyable career in teaching.
    Graham Holley
     

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