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I want one

Discussion in 'Cookery' started by BelleDuJour, Jan 26, 2012.

  1. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    Bet this is top of nick's wish list too!
    I'd like to give it a go but it is a bir pricey for what you get.
     
  2. lapinrose

    lapinrose Lead commenter

    Bet as a scientist, you could make a cheaper version without the fancy packaging!!
     
  3. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    It looks ace and great fun. I agree you could probably hunt around and get it all for far cheaper from a good pharmacist or online!
     
  4. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    Yes, I'm sure you can get all the bits and pieces elswhere and cheaper, but you need the kit first for all the instructions.
     
  5. egyptgirl

    egyptgirl Senior commenter

    It looks kind of like an adult version of a toy set I would buy for Scarlett - hours of fun!
     
  6. modelmaker

    modelmaker Occasional commenter

    After I read lapin's post this morning, I briefly scanned youtube on the topic before I went to work. There's tips if you want to watch them.
    My own ventures into this sort of thing began with the addition of some cochineal to the water I boiled spaghetti in to serve to my sister and her suitor at that time."The spaghetti is red!" he exclaimed.
    "Yes," I answered, It was cooked in sun-dried tomato juice. He ate every scrap and we discussed the possibility of cooking spaghetti in the juice of green peppers which I knew I'd be able to do if he ever visited again as we had green food colouring among the herb and spices basket as well.
    On a more serious note, I took the radical idea this week of cooking some caramelised carrots in carrot, celary and pear stock, the stock being made by with the juice extractor that take up a significant anount of workspace and is otherwise rarely used.
    I believe there was some promise in these carrots, but my daughter rang while they were cooking, I left my sweetheart in charge and she turned all the pans off, eventualy causing a row because everything had gone cold.
    Naturaly, I told her she could eat a late meal and if my daughter was with us she'd be helping it onto the table, but she wasn't with us and there was no amount of aggression that would curtail the few moments I get with my daughter.
    To my knowledge, the dish was never eaten unless it was given to the dog in my absence.
    The quesation that remains unanswered for me whether it's possible to increase the intensity of flavour in a vegetable by cooking it in juice extracted from it's brothers or their friends.
     
  7. egyptgirl

    egyptgirl Senior commenter

  8. egyptgirl

    egyptgirl Senior commenter

    Yes, I thought that but the celery does look good and the little bits of caviar would add an aesthetic quality to the plate.
     
  9. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    I have to agree. There's plenty of ways to present food beautifully without attempting to be apprentice to Heston!
    I think maybe if I want my food to llok like Heston's I'll go eat in his restaurant.
    I suspect one could spend so much time and effort with these fancy bits that hte actual food will get less attention and not be as good as anticipated.
     
  10. mmmmmaths

    mmmmmaths New commenter

    I often pop in to cookery to see what you are all having for dinner tonight so I feel a little like a stalker!

    I was wondering if the pea and ham soup is the one which is blended to give a froth and is drizzled with mint oil.

    I was reading a Heston pea and ham soup recipe in a magazine today and it sounded and looked delicious.

    If it is the same recipe, do you have any tips?
     
  11. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    I want a plastic dough scraper. Modest in my requirements, moi.
     
  12. modelmaker

    modelmaker Occasional commenter

    I suspect every poster on cookery welcomes viewers so don't feel guilty about looking in. Tell us what you cook yourself, and don't be afraid. Most of us know how to cook a bit but would struggle under the pressure of cooking outside our home environment.
    My personal view on pea and ham soup is that properly cooked using a ham bone for the stock it needs no further treatment to make it a memorable meal.
    When we lived close to a Morrisons I'd search out the deli counter to see if they had any ham bones for sale. For about a quid or less I'd pick them up with enough ham for the soup and enough for some sandwiches or to keep the dog quiet.
     
  13. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    It sounds like it!
    We didn't cook a ham specially for the soup - we'd had one on the weekend and I saved the ham the stock for the soup.
    Don't skip the sieving stage. As it's made with frozen peas (rather than skinless, dried, split ones), the skins don't puree down very far and need sieving out or the texture is wrong.
    You don't get a massive amount - think of it as a light lunch or a first course rather than a main meal.
    I guessed at the mint oil quantities as I didn't want to make a large batch, and it was quite weak, so I didn't use it. It still tasted great without the oil. I certainly wouldn't use commercial mint sauce - it would be far too strong and would destroy the taste of the soup.
    It is lovely though - enjoy!
    And do post back!
     
  14. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    Having just read the DM review of this kit, I'm convinced £45 is a lot of money to pay just to end up with caviar shaped ketchup, tomato jelly in celery, a 'fake' fried egg and two things that didn't work!
    Impressive as the ketchup and mustard caviar looked, it's really only served with burgers and even the best homemade burgers do not, IMO, need this kind of embelishment. If I wanted tp impress my guests I'd make a homemade ketchup or tomato chutney, not transform bought condiments into littlebeads.
    So, it's off my wish list now.
     
  15. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    Whilst the recipes included are probably for the items mentioned, I hadn't been thinking of making those specfic ones, myself.
    I had thought it more useful to learn the basic techniques associaed with such items and trhen using it myself in more interesting ways. The processes won't be limited to tomatoes, ketchup or mustard.
    Agreed - ketchup and mustard spheres, just to have the top half of a burger bun splatted on top is a little silly.
    Used other ways could be quite fun though. Maybe, as a starting point, little 'pearls' of horseradish in freshly opened oysters?
     
  16. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    Maybe nick but a hell of a lot of effort (and expense) for very little reward!
    I can't help but think it could end up with a menu being planned around 'where could I put little beads of mustard/horseradish/ketchup/whatever' rather than simply choosing the est. freshest ingredients around and planning a menu around them.
    No, it's not for me. I'll stick to red wine vinegar and shallots on my oysters!
     
  17. Speaking of Heston at Home - I bought it for my eats-because-he-has-to husband for Christmas and he's now a whirling dervish in the kitchen. We've tried the chicken and ham pie - it didn't look amazing but was heavenly! and the duck dumplings (don't bother with the broth to go with them) and the belly pork. That took 3? 4? days but was TOTALLY worth it. It was amazing. I had to go out and buy about a hundred different thermometers but still... he clearly knows what he's talking about. We're having the chilli sometime this week and I can't wait (secretly hoping I'll come home after parent's evening on Weds to a big bowl of hot chilli)
     

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