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I know I am not perfect but come on - student teacher obs.

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by dominant_tonic, Jun 22, 2012.

  1. dominant_tonic

    dominant_tonic Established commenter

    Apalling. I know they are student teachers, but keep in mind they are PGCE not BEd., so should have an amount of knowledge of their own subject.
    English lesson.
    Student teacher teaching a low ability year 7 class.
    Topic: verbs
    <ol>[*]Teacher puts a list of words on board, for students to spot the verbs. One of the words was fish - not a good coice I thought, confirmed by a student choosing fish as a verb, which the teacher explained was a noun, despite kid saying that he goes fishing, and it is something he does. [*]When pupils were copying from the board, the teacher asks the class 'Have we all wrote that now?'!!!!![*]Filling in the blanks with verbs (all in different tenses which irritated me hugely, and I thought muddied the waters somewhat for such a low ability class, but that could be me being pedantic). Cows eat grass was an example. The last one was 'The Teacher asked tth students to work ________. Yep. The suggested verb, was <u>quietly</u>. How did quietly become a verb you may ask? She did explain that it was because you were doing it! So obviously adding an 'ly' to an adjective makes it a verb nowadays not an adverb![*]This lesson was repeated later in the day - last lesson, with all mistakes present and complete.</ol>Now, I am no english teacher, and may make many fine, nuanced grammatical errors, but I sure as heck would not say wrote instead of written, and I know the difference between a verb and an adverb. My subject knowledge for my subject carries me further than a low ability year 7 class.
    Oh, and she has a job for September.
    This after also covering a class for a D&T student teacher, who started the lesson ten minutes late after being unable to find the workbooks for the class, then some were sharing as she printed more off. She left me to teach the class half way through while she finished making a cake for some school event or another in the classroom next door.
    I don't routinely slag off student teachers, especially this time of year when they are so fraught with compiling evidence ad doing dissertations etc. but these expales really really hacked me off. Absolutely apalling and gainfully employed. Yes, I'm bitter after yeat another Spetmber comes with no post, but even given that aside, it is worrying.
     
  2. dominant_tonic

    dominant_tonic Established commenter

    Apalling. I know they are student teachers, but keep in mind they are PGCE not BEd., so should have an amount of knowledge of their own subject.
    English lesson.
    Student teacher teaching a low ability year 7 class.
    Topic: verbs
    <ol>[*]Teacher puts a list of words on board, for students to spot the verbs. One of the words was fish - not a good coice I thought, confirmed by a student choosing fish as a verb, which the teacher explained was a noun, despite kid saying that he goes fishing, and it is something he does. [*]When pupils were copying from the board, the teacher asks the class 'Have we all wrote that now?'!!!!![*]Filling in the blanks with verbs (all in different tenses which irritated me hugely, and I thought muddied the waters somewhat for such a low ability class, but that could be me being pedantic). Cows eat grass was an example. The last one was 'The Teacher asked tth students to work ________. Yep. The suggested verb, was <u>quietly</u>. How did quietly become a verb you may ask? She did explain that it was because you were doing it! So obviously adding an 'ly' to an adjective makes it a verb nowadays not an adverb![*]This lesson was repeated later in the day - last lesson, with all mistakes present and complete.</ol>Now, I am no english teacher, and may make many fine, nuanced grammatical errors, but I sure as heck would not say wrote instead of written, and I know the difference between a verb and an adverb. My subject knowledge for my subject carries me further than a low ability year 7 class.
    Oh, and she has a job for September.
    This after also covering a class for a D&T student teacher, who started the lesson ten minutes late after being unable to find the workbooks for the class, then some were sharing as she printed more off. She left me to teach the class half way through while she finished making a cake for some school event or another in the classroom next door.
    I don't routinely slag off student teachers, especially this time of year when they are so fraught with compiling evidence ad doing dissertations etc. but these expales really really hacked me off. Absolutely apalling and gainfully employed. Yes, I'm bitter after yeat another Spetmber comes with no post, but even given that aside, it is worrying.
     
  3. VelvetChalk

    VelvetChalk New commenter

    I would be wary of posting something like this, when I was at my lowest point a while ago I did similar and got slaughtered but I do know how you feel. I still worry about people that interview/write applications forms well but are not as good at the actual job...happens in all professions. I have developed a more supportive attitude recently and not just because I secured a post.

    Also I would like to add stress produces mistakes, especially with someone watching. Also, the teacher could have been dyslexic (which I also am and an literacy primary specialist) which can make things difficult.
     
  4. dominant_tonic

    dominant_tonic Established commenter

    Thank you for the warning. Genuinely. However, I just don't care. I may come to regret it and have the thread pulled. However, how an someone teah an inadequate lesson to year seven low-ability, does not bode well for a student techer who has just got a job teaching KS3,4, and 5. I think all teachers should know when to use wrote and written, especially when they could be preparing students to study English at undergrad level at this point next year.
    I also think that teachrs should be prepared enough to start the lesson on time, or within fie minutes, and not apologising to supply teacher ten minutes in that they have not found the booklets.
    I would understand it more from a qualified regular teaher given the othr responibilities they have, but as a student teacher, teaching is your main responsibliity, and not having booklets set aside for the last lesson of the day, directly after lunch when you are still supposedly trying to make a good impression is laughable.
    My attitude is supportive generally - I would be failry confident that you could look up my user name on this site, and not find one other post in this vein, and I have been posting here a few years. I do not routinely slag other teachers off, but even if the teacher was dyslexic, it would not have been the first time that she had come across a verb and an adverb, and damn it, it is her business to make sure her version of the language is correct, Surely as a dyslexic person yourself, you are aware of your weaker areas and would double check these before presenting them to a class? We all have weaknesses, but it is our job to identify these and ensure they do no impede the learning of our pupils.
    Support yes, but an English teacher who cannot explain verbs to a year 7 class? Wrong.
     
  5. spiderwomen

    spiderwomen New commenter

    I know how you feel. I've observed student teachers who have carried on teaching despite the entire class not listening- and the most common in my opinion is the lack of energy in their teaching. I've become so bored with the lesson that I've stopped listening. When I was training- I had such a difficult mentor who slammed my lesson if it was anything less than outstanding. Don't worry about receiving negative comments to your post- you can't please everyone. Write what you feel.
     
  6. It does make you wonder how people like this get on the course in the first place, especially as English is one of the most competitive PGCEs to gain a place on.
    I definitely think there is a massive difference between how people perform in interview and what they're like in the classroom. It took me several tries to get my PGCE place, because in interviews I tend to go into panic mode and just say everything that comes into my head. Yet in the classroom I normally feel quite calm.

     
  7. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    Had I been the supply teacher observing the PGCE student, I'd have been sending them notes during the lesson pointing out their errors so that they could rectify things as soon as possible.
    Telling the student about that when the exercise was first displayed on the board would have allowed the verb 'work' to be deleted and 'quietly' added to the sentence before the sentence confused the children.
    I agree that it's galling to be under-employed yourself (and fully competent), whilst weaker candidates are achieving QTS and getting the jobs because they are cheaper. Ultimately, pupils and standards are suffering.
    I've taken early retirement as my services were only required when no cheaper alternative was available.
     
  8. hammie

    hammie Lead commenter

    I blame the BBC and the political masters who ahve forced them to dumb down!
    last night I was told that an event would see "strong queues" which seemed a little odd and then today on Ceefax I read that about a vehicle that had "speeded along" and I was not even looking out for problems.
    The journalists (who I presume have some form of advanced language qualification) should be glad that they do not post on here!!
     
  9. I have seen and heard lots over the years which make me wonder how many teachers achieve QTS, but two things stand out in my mind because they were written on notices on the wall.The first was a note for parents on a classroom door which went like this :

    "please be careful opening the door children may be stood or sat behind it"

    second was a classroom rule for reception class:

    "Play nice"

    Both were qualified, and in their respective schools, highly repected teachers.
     
  10. WeeMcBeastie

    WeeMcBeastie New commenter

    This really annoys me too. I had a vile TA working with me last year who labelled her tray 'Mrs X's Draw'! She was one of the 'I've been here longer than you so therefore I know more' brigade. She once told a group of children that you simplify fractions by subtracting them, and then argued with me that her method was correct and that myself and the answer book must be wrong! She even told the children that I had marked their work incorrectly! The head of that school also asked where the apostrophe went in the title 'Visitors Book' I was shot down for replying that it didn't, not just by the head but all of the teachers present at the meeting!. Later at the school fete, I overheard an elderly gentlemen saying, "Oh look, someone has put an unnecessary apostrophe in the title Visitors Book, and they say standards of literacy aren't in decline". It was a real struggle to hide my smirk and to resist the temptation to tell him who was responsible!!!
    I also witnessed a student teacher recently who thought that shouting 'Shut the hell up' was an effective and acceptable behaviour management strategy!
     
  11. spiderwomen

    spiderwomen New commenter

    Shocking!
     
  12. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    I've seen loads of children with convictions about what must be true because that's what they've been told.

    A whole school who thought all words ending in "ly" were adverbs.
    A class where indirect speech had to have "that" in.
    I was asked to teach a fully prepared and resourced maths lesson where the LO was about regular shapes but the way it was explained on the powerpoint and resources was factually incorrect about what a regular shape is.

     
  13. Moony

    Moony Lead commenter

    Whilst I'm not about to suggest that any dyslexic should be teaching I would say that if a persons dyslexia is as bad as outlined in the OP then why are they teaching english? If you are going to be a literacy specialist in primary and have dyslexia then I'm going to assume that you've worked your **** off to get to the point where your dyslexia has a negligable impact on your writing, which fits with the posts of yours that I've seen. And before anyone complains that I've said that some dyslexics might want to avoid teaching english I'm dyslexic myself and whilst I have worked hard to get my english to a decent standard I'd not be happy if children where depending on me to teach them english.
     
  14. VelvetChalk

    VelvetChalk New commenter

    To be honest, I think its how you view both Literacy as a subject and Dyslexia itself.

    Literacy is not just about grammar and spelling, especially in Primary.

    I do work hard to ensure my writing is good and my grammar (more of a problem than spelling for me)is up to scratch, and if errors are made then its not the end of the world. My dyslexia brings both creativity to the whole class and empathy with those who struggle with reading and processing their thoughts. I have been told my creative writing lessons are inspirational and visionary and I am passionate and successful when encouraging children to write. My basic skills may be slightly less refined than some of my colleagues but I'll be damned if my literacy lessons become dull and children don't feel like writing.

    We all do typos after all ;)
     
  15. Dunteachin

    Dunteachin Star commenter

    Hang on. Visitors' Book does have an apostrophe, as I have just written it.
    Is that what you were trying to say?
     
  16. Crowbob

    Crowbob Lead commenter

    No, it does not. The book does not belong to the Visitors.
     
  17. WeeMcBeastie

    WeeMcBeastie New commenter

    I may have forgiven the head for thinking that 'Visitors' Book' might have been correct. But as Crowbob pointed out, the book doesn't belong to the visitors! What this head actually wrote was 'Visitor's Book'
     
  18. Dunteachin

    Dunteachin Star commenter

    Mmm. A moot point.
    Where is Middlemarch?
     
  19. Crowbob

    Crowbob Lead commenter

    It is adjectival. It is describing the book. It is a book OF visitors and not a book FOR visitors. Same as "Accidents Book", "Expenses Book" etc.
     
  20. God you lot - you are so bloody controlling - why are teacher so OCDC - thank god I am doing something else. (But still check into the forum, just to get myself worked up and irritated.)

    But you know what - you are so SMALL MINDED!
     

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