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I have no ideas - please help! Tracking an argument - how to teach it?

Discussion in 'English' started by chocolateheaven, Apr 15, 2011.

  1. chocolateheaven

    chocolateheaven New commenter

    I've been preparing resources for our revision day next week, and am just about getting there now - but have no idea how to teach this! My HoD has devised the plan for the day, and asked me to resource it, and she wants a 15min activity on how to track an argument for AQA paper 1 section A. I feel completely clueless - does anyone have any suggestions at all?
     
  2. chocolateheaven

    chocolateheaven New commenter

    I've been preparing resources for our revision day next week, and am just about getting there now - but have no idea how to teach this! My HoD has devised the plan for the day, and asked me to resource it, and she wants a 15min activity on how to track an argument for AQA paper 1 section A. I feel completely clueless - does anyone have any suggestions at all?
     
  3. regentsreject

    regentsreject Occasional commenter

    Give the students a reasonably simple article and give multiple choice answers - this article is about....Then show them the highlighted points in the article that led to the right answer.
    Give them another and ask them to come up with the multiple choice answers, including the right one. Ask them to highlight the points in the article that led to them knowing the right answer.
    Put them in pairs, give each pair two articles (different ones). Ask them to read their article then turn it face down and tell their partner what it's about - what the argument in it is. Not allowed to refer back to the article until they've summarised it then together, they can look at each article and highlight the points which led to them being able to summarise it.
    Put three articles on a table. Give the students a pile of points on separate strips of paper/post its, which are distilled from the three articles. They have to match the points to the article.
    Key to all this is good articles - short, not too difficult but containing enough points. GCSE textbooks should provide some fruitful material. Good luck
     
  4. thequillguy

    thequillguy New commenter

    All goods points!

    At this stage of the game, I would also look for ways of modelling how to answer. Generally speaking, I focus on seeing if the students can identify purpose and audience in an article, and express it in the first sentence of their answer. (e.g. Branning aims to persuade those concerned about climate change that we have already damage our planet too much.)

    Then, seeing as it's a reading paper, and not a writing paper, I would ensure that they use a connective to indicate each of the points of the argument that they have identified. Even 'firstly', 'secondly' and 'lastly' are great ways to guide the examiner to show the candidate has identified points in the argument.

    I would also consider modelling how to express the 'how' of the points (not least as the follow the argument question leads onto the language, fact and opinion, and the presentation questions). Generally speaking, I teach that the more specific the 'how' (the final PEE or a form of PEE) is to the purpose and audience of the article, the better. With this in mind, I would create a series of model answers that suggest either a vague: 'the article suggests that most drivers over the limit give a reading of '150mg of alcohol' which is technical language which makes it seem convincing to reader; or a more specific: ' the article suggests that most drivers over the limit give a reading of '150mg of alcohol' which suggests that divers should stick to a specific number of units. The clarity of this measurement suggests that there can be no excuses for drivers drinking too much.'

    Very interested in teaching approaches and modelling of paper 1, so looking forward to seeing what this thread brings up.
     

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