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I am now the only teacher in living memory...

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by bigpedro, Jan 24, 2012.

  1. bigpedro

    bigpedro New commenter

    Well, not quite, but i've noticed a massive shift in student attitudes towards me this year. Pupil behaviour in my classroom seems better and I suddenly have that thing where other people's classes go silent when I enter. I can only put it down to 2 things...
    Either... No student remembers a time before me. I am now a constant, therefore I know more about the school than them e.t.c..
    Or... Its taken me 5 years to finally settle into the role comfortably enough to be confident in my approach to the place e.t.c.
    Has anyone else found that theres a change after being in a job for around this long? Why has it taken this long?

    Curious Pedro.
     
  2. bigpedro

    bigpedro New commenter

    Well, not quite, but i've noticed a massive shift in student attitudes towards me this year. Pupil behaviour in my classroom seems better and I suddenly have that thing where other people's classes go silent when I enter. I can only put it down to 2 things...
    Either... No student remembers a time before me. I am now a constant, therefore I know more about the school than them e.t.c..
    Or... Its taken me 5 years to finally settle into the role comfortably enough to be confident in my approach to the place e.t.c.
    Has anyone else found that theres a change after being in a job for around this long? Why has it taken this long?

    Curious Pedro.
     
  3. kittylion

    kittylion Established commenter

    Yes I think there is definitely a plus in having been there longer than even the oldest pupils - although it's all relative. A lot depends on the school.
     
  4. Tom_Bennett

    Tom_Bennett Occasional commenter

    Absolutely true. New teachers need to hear this more often- good BM doesn't happen like magic- it takes time to build up the relationship where the kids trust you....to lay down the law, to do what you say you will, etc. Well done, you. Spread the word.
    Read more from Tom on his blog, or on his Twitter here.
     
  5. Ms Chipping

    Ms Chipping New commenter

    I definately agree. After 5 years teaching and 4 years at my current school I find the kids generally don't try to take me on any more. When you've known them since they were 12 its difficult for them to be confrontational to you when they're 16. I'm sure its partly to do with staying power. Students respect it and know the school must have/ will back you up, as you've been there so long. Your reputation in the school spreads from the older kids to the younger ones joining, and that helps breed respect.
     
  6. Dragonlady30

    Dragonlady30 Star commenter

    In my case, I found that where I had taught the parents, the kids were brilliant!! [​IMG]
    On one occasion I overheard one student say to another who was 'flexing' his argumentative skills, 'Stop!! My mum said never take her on (me). She breathes fire; real fire!' Hence my user name which was my nicknmae for X years. [​IMG]
     
  7. ILoveTeaching

    ILoveTeaching New commenter

    Took me about 4 years in my last school. I have thought about this a lot and it is why i didnt move school for a long time. There is something nice about instant respect when you walk through the door. I have none in my new school as I just moved there in September. I look forward to the same thing happening in a few years :)
     
  8. ILoveTeaching: There is something nice about instant respect when you walk through the door
    Of course, this is what should happen for EVERY teacher. It used to; in decent schools in the past, there were rules/conventions about behaviour to ALL teachers. But I guess those days have gone forever...
     
  9. I know what you mean, having taught at the same school in Thailand for over 6 years.
    I always tell new teachers to
    1.Move all the furniture around in your new classroom.
    2. Change schedules and all classroom activities.
    3.Stand outside the classroom and invite students into <u>Your classroom.</u>
    No matter how long a student has been at the school , he has never been in <u>your classroom</u> before.
    and so you have the upper hand.
    <u></u>
     

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