1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Hypochondriac Central

Discussion in 'Health and wellbeing' started by Lilyofthefield, Aug 4, 2011.

  1. Posting about IBS earlier, I looked it up and found a link that said "Thyroxine overdose". As I take Thyroxine, I clicked it and discovered that quite a lot of the symptoms I had ascribed to menopause, and which got worse when I came off HRT, are symptoms of thyroxine overmedication.
    My blood tests always come back top of the safe maximum dosage, so now I'm idly wondering, in the Me And My Google way my GP hates so much, if I've been getting too much. It's not unheard of for me to forget I've taken it either, and take another, although that wouldn't be more than once in a month.
    Hair falling out, hot flushes, forgetfulness, sore eyes, headache, abdominal pain, cramp - I've got the lot! HRT inhibits thyroxine absoprtion, so maybe while I was taking HRT, it masked the dose, and the symptoms got worse when I stopped it. Weight loss too - the lighter you are the less you need.
    Will see if it settles now I'm back on HRT.
    Somebody really should take Google off me.
     
  2. Posting about IBS earlier, I looked it up and found a link that said "Thyroxine overdose". As I take Thyroxine, I clicked it and discovered that quite a lot of the symptoms I had ascribed to menopause, and which got worse when I came off HRT, are symptoms of thyroxine overmedication.
    My blood tests always come back top of the safe maximum dosage, so now I'm idly wondering, in the Me And My Google way my GP hates so much, if I've been getting too much. It's not unheard of for me to forget I've taken it either, and take another, although that wouldn't be more than once in a month.
    Hair falling out, hot flushes, forgetfulness, sore eyes, headache, abdominal pain, cramp - I've got the lot! HRT inhibits thyroxine absoprtion, so maybe while I was taking HRT, it masked the dose, and the symptoms got worse when I stopped it. Weight loss too - the lighter you are the less you need.
    Will see if it settles now I'm back on HRT.
    Somebody really should take Google off me.
     
  3. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    A specialist I saw recently was talking me through my ultrasound (it was for a breast lump) and he suddenly - and without any provocation or warning - said 'Have you been Googling this?' in the most suspicious way possible.
    I replied that as it happened I had not, since he'd assured me on my last visit it was almost certainly cysts and I saw nothing to be gained from looking that up.
    He then ranted on for quite a while about how the internet was the work of the devil, etc.
    Clearly, we're driving all doctors slowly, but surely, barking mad.

     
  4. It must be the equivalent of an irritating parent turning up at the door every afternoon telling how best you could have individually tailored your lessons to suit the little prince.
     
  5. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    Ha! I am (obviously) guilty of telling doctors what I've found on t'internet, but it shows how much it's happening when they accuse you of it out of the blue.
    I did once accurately diagnose what was wrong with our dog through the internet, however - he'd developed a white patch on his (black) nose and I found that it was probably caused by his drinking out of a plastic bowl, so we switched his water to a ceramic one and it disappeared.
     
  6. The internet is bound to be a tempting source of information to someone who is ill / injured and wants more information / understanding.
    Doctors really need to accept that there are a variety of factors that encourage us to do it - it's next to impossible to get an appointment; if you're lucky enough to get an appointment, you get 10 minutes - if that, of not quite their full attention; it take weeks/months (years?!) to get anything done about a problem; you're not always given the full information or the best options.
    If I hadn't googled some seriously horrendous things about my hip problem, I probably wouldn't have been quite as persistent about them following it up this time. It causes me pain and discomfort, but I'd been fobbed off for years, so what difference was another few going to make?! As it turns out, I still haven't managed to google a diagnosis for that, however I did accurately diagnose tendonitis of my knee last week!
     
  7. I once diagnosed my dad's basal cell carcinoma through google. He went to doctors several times and was given creams etc. I printed out the name and gave it to my dad to take with him. Doctor said he doubted it but dad persevered and he was referred. He ended up with a huge skin graft on his face, it had grown very deep. I do get myself worked up though when googling and imagine alsorts lol
     
  8. My dad has twice diagnosed a DVT and not been believed by the doctor. Admittedly there was no google involved here, he'd had one before and knew the symptoms so wasn't going to be fobbed off. He literally had to spell out what was wrong, how he knew and then tell the doctor what he needed to do.
    The most recent time actually shows incompetence on the part of those treating him, and why he's not complaining I have no idea. He had an ultrasound, and was told there was nothing there. He had to identify the clot on the ultrasound himself and point it out to the doctor.
     
  9. ilovesooty

    ilovesooty Lead commenter

    I'm currently suffering from golfer's elbow. I diagnosed myself - and the doctor took all of ten seconds to confirm it.
     
  10. You must be really tee'd off. Don't try and iron with it, and be careful if you have to drive. If it's rubbing against your sleeve, you could try cutting a hole in one.
     
  11. I had that and it responded well to physio and acupuncture.
     
  12. My alcoholic friend just called. She's just come out of hospital (I thought she was on holiday) having had a heart attack. She's more than delighted that the heart attack was caused by Takotsubo Syndrome, which is not, in fact, caused by drinking.
    It was hard to know quite what the appropriate response to that was, especially since she'd had to have three pints of blood because of a tear in her oesophagus brought on by repeated vomiting of booze. [​IMG]
     
  13. lardylady

    lardylady Lead commenter

    I had to go and Google that [​IMG]
     
  14. Me too. Good old Google. I'm afraid that on balance I would have to beat off with a stick anyone who tried to take it off me!
     
  15. Ooooo look I've not got sciatica at all! I've got a misaligned pelvis (and as soon as he pointed it out, it was quite obvious!) so am off to google it!
     
  16. wordsworth

    wordsworth Senior commenter

    i noted this morning that my ganglion is back after an absence of 6 years. My quandary is: is it ethically sound for an atheist to use the Bible to hit her (or his) ganglion?
     
  17. It's as good as any other old book.
     
  18. Er the first 5 are symptoms of not having enough thyroxine.

    Try to wean yorself off google, try the BNF - you have to register but it is gret for looking up your meds, interactions, doses etc.

    Go on, try it
     
  19. I don't have a bible, the argos catalogue worked though
     
  20. Oh go for it Wordy. It's a nice weighty tome. Be a...Devil. [​IMG]
    We'll look out for bolts of lightening over your part of the UK.....
     

Share This Page