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"Hypermiling" to save fuel

Discussion in 'Personal' started by Ivartheboneless, May 21, 2019.

  1. colpee

    colpee Star commenter

    I’d prefer they just made cars more efficient at higher speeds - I hate pootling along.
     
  2. Duke of York

    Duke of York Star commenter

    I find it interesting that in my location (south Hampshire, where we are served with some excellent motorways and dual carriagway roads) motorists frequently drive way below the speed limit. There are always some in a hurry of course, but it isn't at all uncommon to find car drivers who are happy to travel at 50/60mph, when they could if they wished, do 70 or more.

    When I lived in Kent, it seemed that everyone on the main roads was late for an appointment.
     
  3. Ivartheboneless

    Ivartheboneless Star commenter

    Hypermiling is not just about speed. You can do the speed limit on any road but still employ the techniques. You won't save as much fuel if you do, but people who tailgate, brake at the last possible moment, accelerate until the revs are in the red before changing up etc (i.e. drive like numpties) use way more fuel than necessary without getting to their destination quicker. Are you one of those? This is about not being selfish and ultimately saving the planet.
     
  4. Duke of York

    Duke of York Star commenter

    Nobody likes the discourtesy of tailgaters in the fast lane, but the thing I find most baffling of all, are drivers who stick in the inside lane too close to lorries and are forever braking. One day someone will invent a device that measures how much energy was wasted in unnecessary braking and when the ignition key is removed, say to the driver "Did you know that if you hadn't been such a pillock by driving too close to the vehicles you followed, you'd have been a tenner better off at the end of this journey than you are now."
     
  5. colpee

    colpee Star commenter

    No, but I do prefer a fast drive on a motorway or dual carriage, in nice weather with the music turned up.

    I must admit to a slight selfishness when presented with a clear road after being parked on the M40 or M25 for ages; then planet saving can take a bit of a back seat for an hour or two:rolleyes:
     
  6. Ivartheboneless

    Ivartheboneless Star commenter

    I thought the M25 was a car park?
     
  7. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    1650 miles into our European road trip and car is averaging 82 mpg. Average for today's leg (360 miles) was 82.7 mpg. Tricks to get better mileage include looking well ahead. If you see traffic lights in the distance then adjust speed to try and get there on green. If impossible then take foot off and allow engine to slow you down (my car has KERS so this really helps). Overtaking on fast roads. Use your mirrors and wait until there is nothing close in the fast lane and then you won't have to put the pedal to the metal to overtake before the **** in the Audi is up your chuff. Find the best speeds for the car. Mine likes 65 mph on motorways 5 mph above or below is not as economical. At lower speeds 30 mph is pretty good but 50 is better . So at the moment on 90 kph roads I keep it at 80 kph. On the downhills allow gravity to take the car, it doesn't matter if it slows slightly. The engine is off and the battery is getting a charge which you use a bit further down the road. On the uphills, don't push the car. It does not matter if your speed falls slightly. Never use cruise control if you can possible help it. Avoid sudden speed changes if possible. Accelerate gently, brake likewise. I should say I drive a petrol hybrid (HEV).
     
  8. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    Or limot your driving to the 4 mile M606 out of Bradford. My old Renault would get 99.9 mpg (the reading would not go higher) on the way out of Bradford as if you needed any encouragement to leave!
     
  9. Ivartheboneless

    Ivartheboneless Star commenter

    Sounds good, but you can use cruise control selectively, at least in my car which is petrol. It will change down (automatic gearbox) on some uphills to keep to the set speed, but if you switch it off it will stay in the higher gear and still go up at the same speed with maybe a smidge more throttle input. The cruise control I have is obviously only looking at speed. Not using cruise control at all requires more concentration on the drivers part.
    PS What the hell are you driving? 82 mpg?
     
  10. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    I never use cruise control, but put me on a French toll autoroute with 200 miles straight ahead of me and I can pretty much guarantee not to brake until a service area or the exit junction. I'll chug the camper along at its best speed (60-65mph) and take the foot off the accelerator for long downhill sections. That plays merry hell with the estimated range, but it soon corrects on the uphill bit. The camper is a 2.3 litre diesel but we have no practical alternative - at least it's Euro 6 emission standard. The improved engine performance is noticable compared to its 2005 reg predecessor.

    Doesn't running air conditioning in vehicles increase the fuel consumption?
     
  11. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    Have you applied for a 'crit air' sticker for your camper? You need one if you are planning to enter any major French city. They have 7 grades, 0 to 6. Mine is a '1' only all electric cars are '0'. They cost E4 online and last the life of the vehicle. Apparently if pollution/weather is bad then the authorities will issue a day ban of vehicles in the higher categories. You can be fined for not displaying a sticker if you are in a city.
     
  12. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    KIA Niro HEV. Petrol hybrid. Automatic gearbox. Love it! Did 370 miles today. Fuel gauge says half full. Will top up tomorrow before leaving. Half a tank will be 20 to 25 litres. Will blow the last of my Zylotys at the gas station. Best ever trip on one tank was a UK round trip where the car did a smidgeon over 700 miles before I refilled and it needed just over 40 litres to brim the tank.
     
  13. racroesus

    racroesus Star commenter

    True.
     
    lanokia likes this.
  14. racroesus

    racroesus Star commenter

    I prefer not to change speed on a journey.
     
  15. racroesus

    racroesus Star commenter

    I prefer not to change to a lower gear.
     
  16. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    Thanks for the detail - I've had Crit'Air 2 (Euro 6 diesel) and Umwelt Green (access all areas) since we bought the camper a couple of years ago. I don't however have one on the car, so will need to check the status of a couple of Northern French towns that we do weekend flea market flits to from time to time.

    Always worth buying the stickers direct from their home country, not from third party websites who hike up the price. Strictly speaking they last the life of the windscreen, not the vehicle. :)

    Another handy thing for France is a Bip 'n' Go toll tag for the Telepeage lane at the toll booths - costs a bit extra to obtain it but saves a lot of queueing.
     
  17. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    Yes. I have had telepeage tags for about 10 years. No saving on costs (in fact costs a bit more) but the savings on time can be immense. It is nothing to be in a queue for an hour or more at busy times on French motorways. The rapid lanes means you don't even have to stop. We always have anxiety at the first peage as to whether the battery in our transponder is still working! Also in our current car the black gauze insert in the windscreen is almost non existent. We did worry that the signals would not exchange. However last year it did work.
     
    magic surf bus likes this.
  18. Grandsire

    Grandsire Senior commenter

    Great thread!

    We have a mpg competition within the family, now that we all own cars which tell us how we’re doing. I’m currently in the lead at 51.0mpg, but a while back I was up to 55.0mpg, back before the tractor season began. Some members of the family struggle to improve because they don’t do the mileage I do so there’s a lot of starting and stopping, and others find it hard (and I’m thinking of my mother here...) because they appear to have very heavy feet which have to be on one pedal or the other all the time!

    I love trying to judge when to take my foot off to coast to junctions and speed limits so I arrive at the perfect speed. I use the cruise control a fair bit on longer journeys to even things out, and don’t try to race along - 53mph is about right for top speed on the roads I do most regularly. It would help, too, if I wasn’t driving round with a load of stuff in the boot, too, I guess! My emotional state seems to have quite an impact on my fuel efficiency, too ...
     
    ajrowing and magic surf bus like this.
  19. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    ..provided you're not too rapid and you leave enough of a gap for your wing mirrors to get through. :)

    Unfortunately on one trip I didn't, and you can't recover a fallen wing mirror from a busy toll lane. When I looked back I could see it was a veritable graveyard of wing mirrors. I carry spare mirror glass now.
     
    blazer likes this.
  20. Ivartheboneless

    Ivartheboneless Star commenter

    Just to put a damper in. I have read that the cars mpg readings (as well as the ringe stuff) is optimistic. The only way to check that is by the old method; brim to brim and record mileage, and do the maths. That Kia thing sounds good (but I did read they get consistent better reviews than Priuses, and are not as fugly). It all goes to prove what car companies can do when pushed, and about time.
     

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