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Hybrid Teaching

Discussion in 'Independent' started by andywhizz1, Sep 9, 2020.

  1. andywhizz1

    andywhizz1 New commenter

    Hi all

    I am currently teaching both students in the classroom and remotely simultaneously. Some students in temporary quarantine in the UK and some still overseas.

    It is going OK so far but it is very exhausting compared to live or remote teaching alone.

    Are others being asked to do this and if so any advice on what you have found to work.

    Thanks.
     
  2. needabreak

    needabreak Star commenter

    Yes, ditto, add in recording the lesson if students aren't online at the same time as the lesson and ensuring desks are wiped down at the end and its a bit of a faff... doable but it eats into lesson time.
     
  3. CabbageWhite20

    CabbageWhite20 Occasional commenter

    Yes. I’ve only done a few days so far (and a bit last term). It’s pretty demanding but I’m hoping that after a week or two it’ll feel less stressful. In all likelihood we’ll have pupils dipping in and out of quarantine as well so we may as well get used to it.
     
  4. andywhizz1

    andywhizz1 New commenter

    Agreed

    So true. We have had 2 boarding houses in quarantine and now back in lessons but now another 2 are remote tomorrow. Very fluid and volatile situation after only 3 days back!!!
     
    needabreak likes this.
  5. needabreak

    needabreak Star commenter

    If those quarantined pupils have had contact with classmates don't theyball quarantine... possibly the teachers too?
     
  6. andywhizz1

    andywhizz1 New commenter

    It seems to work like this. If a student is suspected to have covid the boarding houses are temporarily quarantined until the test results come through. I know that we are acting on doctors advice before the decision to test is made. Given the volatile situation I think that this is the only approach. If a positive test comes back track and trace measures from seating plans will need to be implemented. Strange times for everyone.
     
    needabreak likes this.
  7. CabbageWhite20

    CabbageWhite20 Occasional commenter

    Those quarantining on site currently are overseas pupils from countries where there is a mandatory 14 day quarantine in entering the uk. If an individual has symptoms they and their family quarantine until they have a negative test. That’s as far as we’ve got so far, and all tests negative.
     
  8. CabbageWhite20

    CabbageWhite20 Occasional commenter

    I don’t think this is our policy. For us I am pretty sure it would only be that individual who quarantined (on site if family are distant) until there was a test result.
     
    jenruddick likes this.
  9. CabbageWhite20

    CabbageWhite20 Occasional commenter

    1 week in and hybrid teaching isn’t fun yet.
     
    andywhizz1 likes this.
  10. Boardingmaster

    Boardingmaster Occasional commenter

    I also find it tricky. The best thing thats worked for me is to have a zoom call on my laptop which is shown on my whiteboard, and to mirror my ipad onto the zoom call. I then do all my work on the ipad, that way pupils in class can see what im writing on the board, and pupils on zoom can see clearly. Still a lot less fun than normal teaching
     
  11. CabbageWhite20

    CabbageWhite20 Occasional commenter

    Teams here. I’m joining the meeting on the desktop and sharing screen with remote learners and those in class. Joining it again on my laptop so I can see the chat (wretched Teams won’t let you see chat when you screen share so if kids are having tech issues you have no idea).
     
  12. CabbageWhite20

    CabbageWhite20 Occasional commenter

    Still going here. I think we’ve become an online school by the back door - pupils with no Covid reasons are starting to opt for online randomly because it’s more convenient at home on that particular day. I’m getting more used to teaching like this but the quality of the education for pupils both on and off site is definitely compromised by my attention being shared.
     
  13. drvs

    drvs Star commenter

    Some of our parents suggested we do this to cater for those on 2 week isolation. We told them "no".
     
  14. colacao17

    colacao17 Lead commenter

    The variety of responses of schools to this is extreme - judgng by the experiences of friends and ex-colleagues around the world.
    I know of at least two countries where, by law, students are back in reduced numbers. The (private) schools have all gone down the same road, rigging up cameras and mics to live stream the lesson to those at home.
    In others, teachers continue to work as in lockdown, screen sharing with those at home via Meet, while students in the class can see the same screen via the projector and able to interact in person with the teacher.
    There are others far less prepared, where a couple of sheets on classroom with a summary of the lesson is all that can be managed. And in between, those which put a laptop or tablet on the front desk, pointing at the screen, in lieu of a full audio visual rig.

    I prefer the screenshare option, but have friends elsewhere who complain that school technology just isn't up to it, that screens constantly freeze and those at home are left staring at an unchanging image.
     
  15. CabbageWhite20

    CabbageWhite20 Occasional commenter

    The gov guidelines say schools should be ready to offer promptly (can’t remember the exact wording) education to children who are not in classrooms due to Covid. Isolating for a fortnight seems long enough at home (or in school quarantine accommodation) to meet that. I find the dipping in and out because parents/kids want to be at home annoying, but I wouldn’t argue with the ones who are quarantining.
     
  16. drvs

    drvs Star commenter

    Sure, we send them work to do.
     
  17. caterpillartobutterfly

    caterpillartobutterfly Star commenter

    We offer 'live check in' several times a day for those at home in quarantine and upload work to Teams for them to complete as they did during lockdown. It isn't as good as 'real teaching' but we currently have very few at home and none from EYFS, which is harder to do remotely.
    That would drive me nuts as well. And for parents who are paying fees it seems a crazy thing to do. I wonder what our head would say to a parent who said they were doing this. I'd be furious if I had to provide work for them.
     
  18. CabbageWhite20

    CabbageWhite20 Occasional commenter

    I’ll be v interested to hear if that works as a long term approach! As a teacher it would certainly be much easier. As a pupil 2 weeks is a long time to work like that.
     
  19. CabbageWhite20

    CabbageWhite20 Occasional commenter

    We’re a business at the end of the day. Our numbers were pretty good anyway but they are even higher now and we are gaining quite a few pupils from nearby state schools that found it difficult to offer remote teaching (understandable) and independents that chose not to go the live route, as well as families who are moving out of urban areas. The economic impact of all of this hasn’t really hit the country yet but our school seems to be doing everything it can to give us a fighting chance. The hybrid teaching is v challenging from a teaching point of view, but I can see why we are doing it.
     
  20. caterpillartobutterfly

    caterpillartobutterfly Star commenter

    LOL Absolutely...and 'the customer is always right'! ;)
    Would still drive me batty though.
     

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