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HPV vaccination for year 8s

Discussion in 'Health and wellbeing' started by bedingfield, Aug 22, 2011.

  1. bedingfield

    bedingfield New commenter

    My daughter is about to start year 8 and had said that last year at her school the girls were all given the HPV vaccination within the first few days of the new school year. She is now worrying about this, as she has a real needle phobia.
    I have had no letter from the school or the local health trust but was wondering if any body else has experience of this. I have Googled about the vaccination and seem to just be able to find the horror stories of side effects etc. One thing I also read was that the decison to have the vaccine lies with the girl not the parents. Does this mean that I will not be informed or given notice of this? If it is my daughter's choice she will not be vaccinated because of the needle thing, but I cannot make up my mind whether it is the safe thing to do anyway.
    I would appreciate any advice or information from parents whose children have already had/refused the vaccine.
     
  2. bedingfield

    bedingfield New commenter

    My daughter is about to start year 8 and had said that last year at her school the girls were all given the HPV vaccination within the first few days of the new school year. She is now worrying about this, as she has a real needle phobia.
    I have had no letter from the school or the local health trust but was wondering if any body else has experience of this. I have Googled about the vaccination and seem to just be able to find the horror stories of side effects etc. One thing I also read was that the decison to have the vaccine lies with the girl not the parents. Does this mean that I will not be informed or given notice of this? If it is my daughter's choice she will not be vaccinated because of the needle thing, but I cannot make up my mind whether it is the safe thing to do anyway.
    I would appreciate any advice or information from parents whose children have already had/refused the vaccine.
     
  3. lilachardy

    lilachardy Star commenter

    Most of our girls had it with no fuss.
    I believe the parent has to give permission, but the decision is with the girl.

    Which would she rather have, an injection, or cancer?
     
  4. bedingfield

    bedingfield New commenter

    I've tried to tell her that it is the best thing that she can do to protect herself. Both my kids have had all childhood vaccinations (they were born during the time of the MMR scares and I still made sure that they had them). However, material on the websites all talk about flu-like side effects and worse. I would like to be able to find more impartial information so that I have more facts.
    My daughter is convinced that the jabs will happen as soon as she goes back - without notice -as that is what she has been told by some of last years Year 8.
    Surely a letter has to go out first to inform parents that it is going to take place?...
     
  5. giraffe

    giraffe New commenter

    There will always be an opt-out for vaccination at school. Give her a letter to take in with her saying that you do not wish her to have the jab.
     
  6. Most of ours had it without much fuss or side effects. You have to give consent and fill in a form - I remember collecting them in - those who didn't bring the forms back couldn't be done. You could ask and see if your GP surgery will do it instead and then you could be there with her.
     
  7. ROSIEGIRL

    ROSIEGIRL Occasional commenter

    My daughters had it too and were fine - slightly sore arm the next day, but nothing to write home about.
    Can you do anything about the needle phobia? There may come a point where a needle/blood test etc is really important - better to tackle it now?
     
  8. ROSIEGIRL

    ROSIEGIRL Occasional commenter

  9. bedingfield

    bedingfield New commenter

    Thanks Rosiegirl for looking at this but she really does get scared at needles. She had to have an operation on her ankle a few years ago and having to insert a canular into her hand really freaked her out. Even though she had been given a numbing cream to help her, myself and the nurses really had to do everything we could to distract her while the procedure was taking place.
    Thanks for the suggestion qu1annie, I'll ring the GP tomorrow and see if I could take her to have it done at the surgery. At least then I can give her some moral support. I think she is also worried that she might make a fool of herself in front of others. If they still do things in the same way as when we had to have our Rubella injections (I attended the same secondary school), it was a case of get into a line and wait for your turn to go behind a screen. Not very private...
     
  10. My daughter had hers at 16, at the doctors and I had to sign the form which seemed weird as she was 16. I did all the googling too and saw the horror stories but she had it done over the 3 sessions and was fine but for a sore arm.
     
  11. copycat

    copycat New commenter

    My daughter is exactly the same. She decided herself to have the HPV and I had to sign the form for her. She had it at school and passed out in front of everyone and terrified her friends as they thought she was dead! She was so traumatised that she refused to have the other 2 injections . She also had to have an operation and was OK until the canula was taken out and then she passed out.
    Last year she was asked to have her triple vaccine at school but we opted out (and I gave her a letter to take to school on the day to make sure she wasn't forced to have it) and I arranged for her to have it at our surgery. She was given the numbing cream , the nurse was brilliant and didn't let her see the needle but she still passed out! (at least she had privacy though).
    Now I don't know what will happen if she has to have anything else done as she refuses to have any more needles, although she did have her ears pierced recently (with a gun) and was fine even though she was worried.
    Personally, I am not convinced by the HPV vaccine as it is NOT a guarantee of not getting cervical cancer .
     
  12. bedingfield

    bedingfield New commenter

    Thanks copycat. It's good to know that there are others out there with the same fears. I have contacted my GP and she can have it done by the nurse at the surgery. I am going to write a letter for school that she can keep in her bag.
     
  13. Just a thought- I stayed with a friend who has a hospital phobia - her phobia is bad enough that they let me go with her into the anesthetic room and stay until she was unconcious - anyway when they put the canula in her hand she freaked because she could still fill it. I hadn't thought to say "it won't hurt, but you will feel it"

    She is better off with the jab, cancer means lots and lots of needles but maybe she is better off having it at her GP's surgery rather than at school.
    When I was at school many moons ago girls for the rubella jab at about the same age but at least one of my friends had hers at the GP because she couldn't do it at school.

    Is it just the jab she is freaked pout about or is it losing face in front of her friends as well?

    If you can get her to the GP, with emla cram first (to numb the injection site) get her to cough when she is given the jab - trust me this stops a lot - but not all of the pain -it's a tip from my GP and it works.
     
  14. I once had a jab many many years ago that was totally pain free lol. The male nurse asked me if I minded him slapping me. It was in my bum. He slapped and stuck the needle in...apart from a sting from a slap it was pain free. Bit Pervy reallly and I expect they wouldn't be able to do that now ha ha. Seriously though have you thought of hypnosis to help conquer the fear? That might help.
     
  15. My daughter had this last year and letters and permission slips went out. She had not problems with any of the jabs and my philosophy is that it's better to go through a bit of short-lived pain rather than a very debilitating and life-threatening illness. Professionals administer the jabs and you may find that your daughter is less likely to react in front of her friends. Perhaps she saves her anxieties for mum, because she knows that you care so much.
    Unfortunately there are always things that are good for your children that are unpleasant. Life can also be tough - if this is the worst thing, she will be very lucky.
     

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