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How would you define an 'Asperger-Friendly School'?

Discussion in 'Special educational needs' started by Gaeb9, Apr 20, 2012.

  1. Hi all,

    I am seeking to define 'Asperger-Friendly Schools' for my academic research and for my professional practice working in schools with children on the spectrum. Your thoughts, phrases and insights will help me shape my research framework, and also contribute to a play being written on the subject for performance in schools.

    I am particularly interested in knowing what you feel Asperger-Friendly Schools 'Do, Have & Believe.'

    My aim is to create an Asperger-Friendly Schools Charter and Playscript from our shared wisdom and that of the young people and parents I am interviewing.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Hi all,

    I am seeking to define 'Asperger-Friendly Schools' for my academic research and for my professional practice working in schools with children on the spectrum. Your thoughts, phrases and insights will help me shape my research framework, and also contribute to a play being written on the subject for performance in schools.

    I am particularly interested in knowing what you feel Asperger-Friendly Schools 'Do, Have & Believe.'

    My aim is to create an Asperger-Friendly Schools Charter and Playscript from our shared wisdom and that of the young people and parents I am interviewing.

    Thanks!
     
  3. Wotton

    Wotton Established commenter

    Think this is a difficult one to pin down. I would say my daughter's school was AS friendly but I do know of another parent who didn't think it was and withdrew their child. Think you can make a list of all the things the school does or could do but even then it would not suit all the AS children.The biggest thing which makes a school AS friendly is flexibility and the ability to adapt to individual children.
     
  4. Leapyearbaby64

    Leapyearbaby64 New commenter

    I think Wotton is right. Staff need to be flexible and adaptable to the needs of each child and not beat themselves up when mistakes are made, especially early on in a relationship with a child. However, all staff need to be using the same rules and rewards - this can be tricky through lunchtimes etc. Lots of really sensible transitions from one setting/class to another. Working closely with parents so that triggers are well understood. In my experience, obvious 1:1 support is not always helpful as the children can get very over-reliant/obsessive.
     
  5. walls all painted plain? pale mauve used?
     
  6. I would say that the key thing that would make a school Asperger friendly is consistency between all the staff that have anything to do with pupils with Aspergers Syndrome. As the others have said, there is such a variety of symptoms that what works for one child may not work with another. For example, I know a woman with Aspergers who loved the fact that she was allowed access to the library at break and lunchtimes when she was at secondary school as the playground was too chaotic and unpredictable for her whereas some students with Aspergers can cope with the playground. Clear and consistent rules followed by everyone work best, in my experience as someone with Aspergers myself.
     
  7. Hi I feel that our Specialsit Provision enables our children with ASC to access the mainstream school, as every child with Aspergers is assessed independently there is no blanket approach as all children have different sensitivities/joint attention difficulties. Every school should have a banl of training an options to support children with Aspergers but it needs to e tailored and selected for each child individually. I think an ethos of the sky is the limit is a good approach as this prepares children for the real world outside and not artificial surroundings that are so controlled that the real world presents even more of a challenge. Changes and challenges have to be introduced in a controlled way . Perhaps most inmportantly is parents neing involved in planning for their children as they know their child best and have already adapted their lives to fit the needs of their child. Good luck with play MH
     
  8. lovely.lady

    lovely.lady Occasional commenter

    Every thing that my school is NOT! I teach in year 5 at an international school which my year 6 son attends who is Aspergers Syndrome and the aspects that you all mention are not present in my school. No wonder I've resigned plus due to a massive trigger my son has spent a term on high anxiety and as a result of 'his'behaviour has been excluded until an up to date ed psych assessment is done. Cut to chase we are in the UK awaiting such a report!!
     
  9. Thank you so very much for these really useful responses. I am extremely grateful to you all for sharing your wisdom and expertise. This will be invaluable in my research and hopefully will reach out to touch and inform students and staff in other schools. Thank you!
     
  10. walls all painted plain? pale mauve used?
    A cross between a library and a morgue?
     

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