1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

How to track marking

Discussion in 'Workplace dilemmas' started by Bonnie23, Aug 31, 2018.

  1. koopatroopa

    koopatroopa Senior commenter

    These days they have to write report on the different materials they have hammered nails into and then reflect on how well they played with the big machines and if they still have all their fingers and other delicate bits afterwards.
     
  2. grumpydogwoman

    grumpydogwoman Star commenter

    @Grandsire

    The square numbers. Doesn't that cause mayhem? Fighting to be 2, 9, 16 and 25?
     
  3. strawbs

    strawbs Established commenter

    errr...2.....???
     
    caterpillartobutterfly and Pomza like this.
  4. Skeoch

    Skeoch Lead commenter

    1.41421356
     
    strawbs likes this.
  5. Pomza

    Pomza Star commenter

    :D
     
  6. Grandsire

    Grandsire Senior commenter

    Ah... the secret is to alternate it with rewards for primes, and not tell them which until they’ve lined up!
     
    caterpillartobutterfly and Pomza like this.
  7. Jolly_Roger15

    Jolly_Roger15 Star commenter

    That is the irony of it. We get back a set of books, following a marking scrutiny, only to find that we get a meaningless comment of the sort for which we would be criticised for putting in a student's book. I would love to see these 'scrutineers' deep marking our deep marking.

    @Grandsire: Evidence, evidence, bloody evidence! About ten years ago, I had an LO. During the feedback session, the observer pointed out to me that my LP contained, "No evidence of your knowledge base." I did not get the meaning at first, so the observer had to explain to me that he meant that I should have written down the knowledge underpinning the lesson, or at least a reference to a text book. You have to provide evidence that you know things! :confused:
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2018
    agathamorse likes this.
  8. grumpydogwoman

    grumpydogwoman Star commenter

    Ha ha. 4.

    Got it. Tell them retrospectively. I was worried about the potential for serious injury but I should have realised! ;)
     
  9. Pomza

    Pomza Star commenter

    What utter b0ll0cks.
     
  10. strawbs

    strawbs Established commenter

    you should have written "my brain"
     
    grumpydogwoman likes this.
  11. FrankWolley

    FrankWolley Star commenter


    Textbooks... Even new ones are often full of errors, and (due to budgetary constraints) schools often only have ones that are far from up to day anyway! :mad:
     
  12. Jolly_Roger15

    Jolly_Roger15 Star commenter

    @Pomza: Sloblocks of the first water, I agree!

    @strawbs : I suppose the only evidence I could have shown him were my degree certificates. In this 'Twilight Zone' world though, he might have countered these by claiming that they were only evidence that I once knew something, not that I did at the time of the LO.
     
    Pomza likes this.

Share This Page