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How to prepare pupils for controlled assessment in DT....

Discussion in 'Design and technology' started by alamph, Mar 31, 2012.

  1. For my PGCE research project I am looking at how we prepare pupils to be independent learners for controlled assessment in DT. So methods like mini skills projects, teaching them to self/peer assess etc.

    What methods do you use to prepare your pupils for controlled assessment? What have you tried that works well or didn't work at all?
    P.S I can't seem to find much literature on this topic so if anyone has come across any please let me know.

    Thank you in advance!
     
  2. For my PGCE research project I am looking at how we prepare pupils to be independent learners for controlled assessment in DT. So methods like mini skills projects, teaching them to self/peer assess etc.

    What methods do you use to prepare your pupils for controlled assessment? What have you tried that works well or didn't work at all?
    P.S I can't seem to find much literature on this topic so if anyone has come across any please let me know.

    Thank you in advance!
     
  3. The skills are supposed to be taught at key stage 3. In reality, as is the case at my place, due to timetable issues most students are not fully prepared for starting a GCSE in Design and Technology at the start of key stage 4.

    Our students receive 2hours a week and work on a carousel changing DT subjects after nine weeks. This means students are stating say a GCSE RM course after only 36 hours of RM skills.

    We have to introduce several small design and make projects in year 10 to develop skills.

    Peer assessment works well. Allowing the students to understand the assessment criteria allows them to achieve higher grades also.

    I also attended a very good CPD course the other day about enhancing achievement through presentation skills which I will attempt to incorporate within the department after Easter.

    Ultimately I think you have to use what works for different classes. Don't be afraid to try different approaches.

    Hope this helps
     
  4. First of all this would depend on your attitude to
    controlled assessment. If you believe
    that the most important thing is that students gain a high mark for working
    independently on a 45 hour controlled assessment task the logical thing would
    be to choose a single task first and work back from there and plan both KS3 and
    4 accordingly. You would then have a
    clear framework for the course ensuring that all of the relevant skills needed
    for the task have been practiced and honed.
    I know of one school that do competency certificates based around the
    skills they want students to have prior to starting the task. They include skills such as how to use a
    scanner, how to record video and voice files, how to set up and use a laser....
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    </font>In days gone by practical skills were taught throughout the
    secondary age range but in a very narrow range of materials and processes
    (woodwork for example). The exam at the
    end was also practical and tested those same skills. Controlled assessment is similar but tests a
    wide range of skills, analytical, creative, manual etc. but there is no ideal
    scheme of work for teaching these. I
    suspect many schools simply teach through a range of design and make projects
    Y7 &ndash; Y10 in the hope that they will be well prepared for CATs.


    There is then the issue of template projects which are the
    backbone of many KS3 programmes. Do you
    continue with the same or do you expect students to be able to create their
    own? That decision will very much depend
    upon the calibre of student and whether they have developed enough of the
    general designing skills to be able to plan their own project. I suspect that few have.


    If you believe that CATs are just another project and you
    will teach the students on demand then you have little to prepare. You perhaps regard independence as being able
    to cope with a particular task over a very short period of time (such as
    writing design criteria). You simply
    prepare lessons covering that part of the task and then give the students the
    next hour to independently do the activity.
    I have even heard one speaker at a DATA conference suggest that two
    projects should be run parallel, one being a practice and the other being the
    examined project (how crazy is that?).


    If your attitude is the cynical one that teachers are under
    so much pressure to achieve that controlled assessment will never really
    succeed whilst the supervisor and the assessor are one and the same then maybe
    the issue of independence is irrelevant.
    As one colleague said recently, &ldquo;its teachers which get grades not kids&rdquo;.


    Finally, wouldn&rsquo;t it be nice if all the awarding bodies had
    the same rules?
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