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How to plan a Literacy unit of work

Discussion in 'Primary' started by jgh123, Mar 12, 2012.

  1. Hiya,
    I'm in my second year of teaching and have never fully understood how to plan a literacy unit of work. I have always had my planning given to me (on placements) and then when I started as an NQT last year the fellow year 5 teacher gave me her planning and wouldn't change it, so I have never really been shown how to plan in. I was to start putting my own stamp on things and actually understanding what I am teaching!
    For example, atm I am doing legends. I know there is example planning on the frameowkr but even that doesnt make sense. Just any advice or tips on how people plan a unit would be really useful.
    Thank You
     
  2. Hiya,
    I'm in my second year of teaching and have never fully understood how to plan a literacy unit of work. I have always had my planning given to me (on placements) and then when I started as an NQT last year the fellow year 5 teacher gave me her planning and wouldn't change it, so I have never really been shown how to plan in. I was to start putting my own stamp on things and actually understanding what I am teaching!
    For example, atm I am doing legends. I know there is example planning on the frameowkr but even that doesnt make sense. Just any advice or tips on how people plan a unit would be really useful.
    Thank You
     
  3. tafkam

    tafkam Occasional commenter

    I can't speak for Literacy specifically, as I've never taught it discretely. However, my general rule of thumb is to work backwards.
    So, for example, if I happened to be teaching about Myths & Legends I'd start with what I wanted to get out of it. Is there a key Reading aim? Are you aiming to get some narrative story-writing at the end of it, or perhaps some non-fiction?
    Once I know this, then I can think about what skills & knowledge the children will need to allow them to achieve that final aim. For example, if I were looking at story-writing, then I might think about their current strengths and weaknesses in that area. If they need to work on more interesting endings (i.e. avoiding waking up from a dream), then I'd plan to draw that out from our reading of existing myths and legends, almost creating our success criteria as we work.
    Within the unit, I'd aim for a mix of text, sentence and word level skills in both reading & writing and plan those in over the course of the unit, so that towards the end the children could draw their learning together in their final piece(s).
    Of course, for some units that may take a week, for others it may take four!
     
  4. Look at the "teaching phases" within the units for some idea of what you could be doing in each phase.
    I always start off by familiarising children with the text type - loads of speaking and listening based around one or two really great exemplar texts: what Pie Corbett calls "loitering with the text".
    Like Tafkam, I then think about specific skills / word and sentence level work needed for that genre, so it might be work on a specific type of complex sentence, direct speech, use of imperatives, etc.
    We then plan our own text - so for myths, we'd create a monster and a hero first, write great character descriptions, draw pictures and label them etc. We'd then "box up" an existing myth, and then plan our own based on that story structure. Finally, we'd edit and improve, based on self- and teacher- assessment.
    For non-fiction, invest in a copy of: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Talk-Writing-across-Curriculum-non-fiction/dp/0335240887/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1331581254&sr=8-1
    [​IMG]which is fantastic!
     
  5. I was exactly like you. I didn't understand the Primary Strategy, it just didn't make any sense to me. I started to make my own plans up based on what the children needed. I started with a grid similar to APP, and ignored all genre teaching. I taught the children how to structure writing, through sentence work. I teach sentence work more than anything. What is a simple, compound or complex sentence? We look at tense, audience, purpose, formal language, informal language etc. Whatever skill I need to teach, leads to the genre. For instance, if I want to teach tense, I will use a diary as that has all 3 tenses used. If I want to teach how to use speech marks, a story genre will appear. It takes confidence to do it, but it works.
     
  6. tafkam

    tafkam Occasional commenter

    As a Y7 teacher, I'd be happy to take a child who'd been in LGR22's class.
    I hate the over-reliance on 'genres'
     

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