1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

How to persuade a pupil to talk to an Ed psyc

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by sabrezak, Jan 22, 2011.

  1. <font size="2">Ed psyc thinks Cognitive behaviour therapy will help this Yr 11 student who is persistently causing low level disruption and is on a last chance. Mum has no power to persuade the daughter as this relationship has broken down. Mum has agreed to the principle of them meeting. The student has refused all support in the past. If I can get her in the room - without being dishonest, I am sure there will be a positive impact. Any good ideas?</font>
     
  2. <font size="2">Ed psyc thinks Cognitive behaviour therapy will help this Yr 11 student who is persistently causing low level disruption and is on a last chance. Mum has no power to persuade the daughter as this relationship has broken down. Mum has agreed to the principle of them meeting. The student has refused all support in the past. If I can get her in the room - without being dishonest, I am sure there will be a positive impact. Any good ideas?</font>
     
  3. Tom_Bennett

    Tom_Bennett Occasional commenter

    Some possible approaches:
    1. Rational appeal to self interest: 'You might as well, because the next step is exclusion (or whatever)'. This might not work if the students beliefs are non-rational, ie their behaviour is driven by emotional states.
    2. Emotional appeal: if you have any kind of influence (or if you know someone who does) then get them to link attending the meeting to their (or your) relationship with the student, eg 'Listen, I want the best for you, and I think you might as well- what have you got to lose? I'd be proud of you,' etc.
    3. Arrange a pre-therapy meeting: get them to meet with you so that you can all have a conversation and hopefully persuade the pupil to agree to further sessions.
    4. Punitive: what kind of sanctions is this pupil experiencing? If all that they get for mucking about is sympathy and therapy, there's a danger that the child feels they can do as they please because they're the centre of attention- indeed, in some children this is the reason for their misbehaviour.Therapy might work for some people, but in most cases, pupils just need to learn to be less egoistic and more attentive to the needs of others, and unfortunately this means punishment as well as listening.
    5. Super-therapy: if you can talk to the child, perhaps you can ask if anything at home is particularly disturbing her. Some behaviour issues are caused by something serious external to the school.
    Good luck to you.
    http://behaviourguru.blogspot.com/
     
  4. <font size="2">Thanks for your response. I am going to use a combination of a couple of your suggestions; this has just helped cement my thinking.</font>
     
  5. Tom_Bennett

    Tom_Bennett Occasional commenter

    No problemo- sometimes I think all we need is a sounding board to bounce ideas off :)







    Normal
    0




    false
    false
    false

    EN-GB
    X-NONE
    X-NONE












































































































































































    /* Style Definitions */
    table.MsoNormalTable
    {mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
    mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
    mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
    mso-style-noshow:yes;
    mso-style-priority:99;
    mso-style-qformat:yes;
    mso-style-parent:"";
    mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt;
    mso-para-margin-top:0cm;
    mso-para-margin-right:0cm;
    mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt;
    mso-para-margin-left:0cm;
    line-height:115%;
    mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
    font-size:10.0pt;
    font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";
    mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";}




    http://behaviourguru.blogspot.com/

     

Share This Page