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How to measure progress in lesson observation for prractical lessons.

Discussion in 'Design and technology' started by StudentRebel, Jul 17, 2012.

  1. Recently my Head of Faculty and I have come unstuck under the new OFSTED criteria when we are observed doing practical in an observation. We have been graded Satisfactory as Progress in the lesson cannot be measured in a 20 minute slot. Though we have correct starters - linked to literacy - and all work is marked, in a practical session this does not count as we have not demonstarted a starting point for progress in a practical session to be measured against. Both of us have achieved Good and nearly Outstanding for other lessons that are "flat" in nature and not based around students demonstarting workshop skills.
    The two lesson were Woodwork and Textiles. We can see how we can achieve this in Graphics for example draw 2 point perspective shape to determine our starting point for demonstrating suitable progress but for practical lessons we struggle for ideas. When we start looking at Cookery we just draw a blank. Are we going to say to students who have to bake a fairy cake for example, off ypou go have a crack at it, chaos reigns as students make a complete hash of it but at least we have measured the students' starting point in order to measure future progress? It just does not make sense.
    Friends have said that for observations perhaps we should change the content for our observation lesson. Both myself and my Head of Faculty refuse to do this. If students are in the practcial part of their project then this will be the lesson observed.
    Recently I went a training session about being an Outstanding Teacher and I posed the question; can all lessons, at whatever part of the scheme of work be outstanding? I was told yes - and with any group!
    To be certain, everything else is ok in the lesson it is just demonstarting progress in a 20 minute slot when the lesson is based around practical skills.
    Any ideas or comments from fellow Design and Technologists out there?
     
  2. Recently my Head of Faculty and I have come unstuck under the new OFSTED criteria when we are observed doing practical in an observation. We have been graded Satisfactory as Progress in the lesson cannot be measured in a 20 minute slot. Though we have correct starters - linked to literacy - and all work is marked, in a practical session this does not count as we have not demonstarted a starting point for progress in a practical session to be measured against. Both of us have achieved Good and nearly Outstanding for other lessons that are "flat" in nature and not based around students demonstarting workshop skills.
    The two lesson were Woodwork and Textiles. We can see how we can achieve this in Graphics for example draw 2 point perspective shape to determine our starting point for demonstrating suitable progress but for practical lessons we struggle for ideas. When we start looking at Cookery we just draw a blank. Are we going to say to students who have to bake a fairy cake for example, off ypou go have a crack at it, chaos reigns as students make a complete hash of it but at least we have measured the students' starting point in order to measure future progress? It just does not make sense.
    Friends have said that for observations perhaps we should change the content for our observation lesson. Both myself and my Head of Faculty refuse to do this. If students are in the practcial part of their project then this will be the lesson observed.
    Recently I went a training session about being an Outstanding Teacher and I posed the question; can all lessons, at whatever part of the scheme of work be outstanding? I was told yes - and with any group!
    To be certain, everything else is ok in the lesson it is just demonstarting progress in a 20 minute slot when the lesson is based around practical skills.
    Any ideas or comments from fellow Design and Technologists out there?
     
  3. I am having the same problem! was also told to change my lesson to a 'one off' however if my school insists on completing "learning walks" every 2 weeks its not fair on the students to not do practical!!!

    I am a HOD and when I questioned SLT about this subject was told to ensure I am questioning all students to show progress?!?
     
  4. Simon67

    Simon67 New commenter

    You are not alone!
    I had a 50 minute lesson observed a month ago by a deputy head. It was a last lesson of a project - and students were assembling different components of their practical work to complete it. I got a good. His one critisism was how did I show progress? My answer - they started off with a pile of pieces, and finished with a finished project. Apparently not good enough.... Same for a Food lesson - same deputy - my answer - started with flour, fat and apples, ended with apple crumble.... not good enough! Yes, I'd done the confidence lines, and the Red/Amber/Green, thumbs up/thumbs down, guided learning, mini pleneries etc etc etc....
    If anyone has an easy to understand/simple to impliment method would sure love to hear it!
    Edit - forgot to mention - our deputy is Maths - during our Mocksted we had a D+T inspector - got a good, and no mention of "how do you display progress?" apart from progress was good, and was actually thanked for NOT doing a one off lesson, but continuing with practical as usual....
     
  5. I feel so much better now I know that others are struggling with this!

    This was suggested to me last week by a visiting trainer.

    Have multiple choice questions ready on a PPT with 3 possible answers a, b & c. Stop the class and ask the question posed. Thumbs up for answer a, thumbs flat for b and thumbs down for c. Then target those students who got it wrong through further questioning

    Haven't tried it yet though! I would be interested in your thoughts about this one!

    FP
     
  6. The key to this so Im told is to have mini plenarys. Stopping students and question them about what they are doing and ask them if they can explain what they are doing, and if they know how they are going to get there.

    I think this translates into writing measurable learning objectives that can "prove " the students are making progress. An example I would give is that the students can demonstrate/explain how the creaming method is used, or measure and mark out a finger comb joint, Even if they dont get this completed hopefully they could explain when, questioned how to do it.

    Setting indvidual success criteria for different groups as well (a pain) but shows differentiation. Try having them printed out and given out to students individually. Then question those groups in a mini plenary seperately. If this can be identified on the lesson plan then even better.

    This is what we have been trialling after advice from so called educational experts. Hope its of some use. Its a pain but its about jumping through hoops. As for learning walks. Only offical lesson observations should formal assessment of the lesson take place so I would worry about drop in sessions by the HT.


     
  7. simon76. None practical SLT never get the practicalities of teaching in a workshop. We cant just put objectives out of a text book on the board.[​IMG]
     
  8. Simon67

    Simon67 New commenter

    Dead right - which it was good to have a D+T bod as an inspector.
    Thumbs up/flat/down, and Red/amber/green only work if the kids are honest. Too often I have caught them out through individual/group questioning - they don't want to admit they don't get it in front of their peers. Even after they have been caught out once, they still keep saying they know more than they do....
     
  9. finamar

    finamar New commenter

    It is all very problematic for practical lessons.
    We have started using practical diaries at KS3 as well as KS4. Students set themselves a target for the lesson and then identify if they have met it. It is in its early stages but is going well with some students; others are struggling because they are not sure what they can complete in a lesson!
    What we emphasise in the setting of the target is the quality of the outcome and have low, middle and high practical samples for students to assess themselves against.
    The diaries have been differentiated: I'll put them on the resource section sometime soon.
     
  10. sav5000

    sav5000 New commenter

    The current OFSTED criteria is based around sit down lessons. It is very difficult to deliver an outstanding practical lesson full stop. A lot of the criteria is ambiguous and subjective.

    I spend a lot of time listening to people who don't teach tell me how to teach. I think the life blood of DT is practical work, and that is what we all enjoy!
     
  11. Q & A sessions during a mini plenary. Stop pupils & get them to discuss what progress they think they have made. Group discussion in pairs or teams of four. Also, get the 'leader' from the group to demonstrate what they have learnt and ask pupils to comment on their skills. Also, have a mini 'journey' for pupils to follow & get them to estimate where they think they are on their journey. Link that to levels & you have demonstrated progress. Unfortunately, we have to play the game.
     
  12. Just adding in my experiances of 2 practical food Ofsted lessons
    1st one was year 8s doing batch production scones selecting they own choice flavourings to add to their basis ingredients - Inspector stayed for 1 hour - non DT specialist - graded outstanding
    2nd y11 final practical for food study - all working independantly, all using timeplans & making notes as they worked etc - Inspector a DT specialist stayed 20mins - good with outstanding featurers - how could I make it better?? - get them to wear chefs whites!!
    Feel that inspectors need to apply some consistency!!
     
  13. I am doing a personal research project on this, and interested by this. I want to develop a stamp/sticker which studnets can use to record verbal feedback (not just from me, but also peers and self reflection) which shows students have made decisions in practical lessons that have improved progress. I want to avoid more bits of paper and passports, level criteria etc as if a student loses it, we are back to square 1. Does anyone else use something like this that they would be willing to share- i can keep you abreast of my progress as well.
     
  14. leverarch1970

    leverarch1970 New commenter

    Extremely interested in reading all of the above. My food lessons are at KS3 (including Year 9) of 50 minute duration, taking into account registering, time factors for coats, hands washed, homework in, part time technician, then the practical etc it is very difficult to assess progress during the practical itself. It has been highlighted by SLT as an area that needs to improve - but they are unable to provide suggestions how.

    One method used is that homework is often an evaluation of the product and their working, so at the beginning they could highlight what they need to improve from what they previously identified and either question or set this as an additional evaluation question within the homework whether it was met.
     
  15. re

    re New commenter

    What skills or knowledge have they learnt at the end of the lesson that they didn't have at the start? If your approach to practical is 'Get your work out and get on with it' you will never achieve a good or outstanding. The difficulty comes when they are all at different stages. So, for an observed lesson, I either do a one-off exercise or confront a particular point that the majority are struggling with e.g. finishing techniques. You must give the observer the opportunity to tick the right boxes!

    I am amazed, by the way, that the OP refers to woodwork and cookery. I haven't seen these taught since the NC came in in the 1980s! And Satisfactory is no longer an OFSTED category.
     
  16. jim09

    jim09 New commenter

    If you sit back and read all of this it reads about satisfying everybody else's criteria so they can go away and tick their boxes and file it away somewhere. Is this what education has come down to? I have been teaching D/T for 15 years and I love the practical sessions with the kids (am I allowed to call them that?). It's chaotic, crazy at times and as much as you try to keep the making all in line so each student is at roughly the same level there is always a gap between the first to finish and the stragglers. The starting point I use are the learning objectives on display and use that to check progress and yes stop and question when there is a natural pause in the lesson, a natural change in the making process which allows you to complete the 'mini plenary'.
     
  17. As the teacher in the room, you should always be in control, so if you have an observer come in, involve them - get a pupil to go over and explain what they are doing in the lesson and how that helps them to complete whatever activity it is they are doing. Call the observer over to see a pupil move through a complex activity to show that they are developing skills, knowledge, awareness of new processes.

    Bear in mind that the observer may not have been in a DT lesson since they were 14!
     
  18. amchugh

    amchugh New commenter

    When we focus too much on measuring progress, we can be prone to ignoring opportunities to deepen the learning that has taken place so far. Weighing the pig won't make it any heavier! Anyway, I wrote about this in greater length on my blog if you want to take a look at why we should STOP OBSERVING LESSONS as a way to measure progress. http://www.teachingandlearningguru.com/measuring-progress/
     
  19. thistledoo

    thistledoo Senior commenter

    That is exactly what can be measured! By adding some choice into the lesson where students choose their ingredients and can explain or justify their choice... the same with using equipment. It is harder in KS3, though. I used to begin with 'targets' and choices they could make. If you are being observed or Ofsted are in students must have to think/ decide/ choose/ discuss/ share/ explain about ingredients/ equipment/ methods/ skills used or the finish applied... that is why it easier in exam work!

    E.g. Making scones: students choose type of flour, or whether to use milk or egg and milk and the same with any of the ingredients. Get students used to questioning consistencies and how to solve problems encountered.

    The major problem here is time. 1 hr or 50 minute lessons: the lesson must have a focus. Work out 3 outcomes for the students e.g. 1) what you expect them to achieve = standard progress 2) good progress will look like and you will have done this 3) outstanding progress will look like and you will have considered this and this.
    Refer to previous lessons where skills and techniques have been used and built on - better still, teach students to explain about previous lessons and how they are using that knowledge and information.

    Hope this helps! (Better late than never... I will try to find and post some example ppts in resources.)
     
    jpini2 likes this.

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