1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

How to make extra money?

Discussion in 'Personal' started by Bonnie23, Sep 8, 2018.

Tags:
  1. Bonnie23

    Bonnie23 Occasional commenter

    Do I just have to be told to clap when a sign is held up? :p
     
  2. Ivartheboneless

    Ivartheboneless Star commenter

    The way the Johnson carries on I'm surprised he hasn't got the clap!
     
    gainly likes this.
  3. thejudgesscoresarein

    thejudgesscoresarein Occasional commenter

    I do CV Writing and charge £100 per CV I write (this is quite cheap compared to others) and I do about 12-15 a month giving me an extra £1,500 per month (£18k a year)- I’ve been doing this now for a number of years. I’ve built my business up and it’s worked!
     
    emerald52 likes this.
  4. Duke of York

    Duke of York Star commenter

    What if they are for jobs at Citroen? They used to insist on applicants having 2CVs. Nobody would want to pay two hundred quid for that, would they?
     
  5. ilovesooty

    ilovesooty Star commenter

    Good grief. This was my day job for a lot of the time until very recently. I can't imagine the clientele prepared to pay that sort of money and would be interested in your development of expertise and qualifications to be able to charge those sort of sums, especially as you claim others can command even more.
     
  6. Toomuchtooyoung

    Toomuchtooyoung Occasional commenter

    Depending on your experience, Open University tutoring.
    If you have a good sized football club they employ lots of people in hospitality and stewarding, it’s every other week so quite manageable. People I knows who do this earn about 60-80 per match.
    A friend who is crafty does a Christmas craft each year which she sells to colleagues and through contacts in big employers. So things like a Christmas mug with a reindeer hot chocolate or scented fir cones., Santa keys. Makes around £500 to help through Christmas.
    As a parent I shell out a fortune for tutoring
     
    emerald52 likes this.
  7. thejudgesscoresarein

    thejudgesscoresarein Occasional commenter

    https://www.cvpilots.co.uk/?gclid=C...5Y9-WXXwsSHLgGT3BmtDT0VLrMALtvpxoCp20QAvD_BwE

    Some people are charging £299 for exactly the same service- granted they are ‘professionals’ in their craft but most people do not have or could justify spending £300 on a CV. £100 is reasonable! I use to charge £25-£50 then I increased when I become more experienced- so there is a demand for it. The audience I target are professionals and people who are being made redundant from their jobs- this is where I thrive as a business!
    I’ve also invested time in attending CV Writing courses too! It’s definitely worth considering doing something like this- if you only make £200-£300 to start with, it’s the extra income you already have!
    Oh, and before anyone comments, I have registered my business and do pay my taxes!
     
    TheoGriff and emerald52 like this.
  8. frangipani123

    frangipani123 Lead commenter


    Very interesting. Roughly how much time do you spend on each CV?
     
  9. Duke of York

    Duke of York Star commenter

    I have to be honest by saying that a job applicant who has to rely on someone else to write a CV is probably unemployable. There's always a way to prevent a sucker getting an even break, ain't there?
     
  10. celago22

    celago22 Established commenter

    Good money and idea! I was thinking more along the lines of supermarket work or dog/baby sitting for extra cash!!
     
  11. thejudgesscoresarein

    thejudgesscoresarein Occasional commenter

    Fair enough, although there isn’t much money in a standard retail job.
    Say you do 16 hours a week (which is straining) if you are employed full time as a teacher, paid at £8.50 per hour, that’s £544 a month before tax. After deductions about £450. It all depends whether you feel it is worth it and whether you are willing to sacrifice your family time.
     
  12. JosieWhitehead

    JosieWhitehead Star commenter

    So Bonnie, which of these ideas appeals to you - or have you found something better to do?
     
  13. Missfendi

    Missfendi New commenter

    i'm looking for teachers in East London, as I want to open a Saturday school but can't find teachers:)
     
  14. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    How much you offering? Saturday I would want £40 an hour
     
  15. Dunteachin

    Dunteachin Star commenter

    @thejudgesscoresarein How do you find the time? I'm sure I've read somewhere that you are/were a Headteacher.
     
  16. oldsomeman

    oldsomeman Star commenter

    Interesting to re-read this item.
    Although retired and getting ancient I still look for work. Trouble is with age some of the outlets are more curtailed by home circumstances, health and an inability to work without the dearly beloved muttering I am overdoing it.
    If you have an aptitude for fixing things or repairs there are niche area such as flat pack assembly in homes or handyperson, particularly if you are a woman. That work, in places like London, could pay you £30 per hour plus.
    Cleaning someone's home can pay as can arranging private shopping for some folk.
    I am in the middle of seeking more work but handyman work for me is curtailed by dam parking restrictions, congestion zones and a Labour lord Mayor's bringing in a LE zone which means I have to get rid of my van.
    If you can find a job you enjoy then its much better.
    My daughter id putting me forward as a tour organiser for events in London where basically you meet and greet, make sure they get there and back from the event and then wish them bon voyage.Till my arthritis arrived I was on course to lead groups on tours via minibus, where another drove and you talked the interest and helped with the comfort of the group. If you have another language such folks are needed to lead parties in other parts of the world,eg one guy looked after the folks on a river cruise boat and ensured the old dears were happy and gave advice as to where to go and what to see.
     
  17. Sillow

    Sillow Lead commenter

    Yeah, interesting to read my post on here. I'm now part-time teaching and running a small business on the side! Much better work/life balance, although I could do with the business making me some money now!
     
  18. gorge441

    gorge441 New commenter

    I believe these sentence - said by Tony Hsieh,
    "Stop Chasing The Money And Start Chasing The Passion"
     
  19. Duke of York

    Duke of York Star commenter

    I'm afraid it needs to be one or the other if you want to make money. It's a bit like getting a bonfire going. You need a critical mass of heat to turn a fire that keeps going out into one that will burn withougt constantly dying.

    It isn't possible to devote enough time to a part-time business to reach that critical point where the business takes off as you hope, unless you're lucky enough to have someone competent enough to tend to it in your absence.

    I don't blame anyone for keeping all options open when they venture into business, but I found trying to do two jobs well, was both frustrating and stressful.

    In the ideal world, I envisaged, I would do three consecutive days for my employer and have four consecutive days a week to devote to my business, but you know what? Nobody wants to see a colleague become more successful than they can, so imaginary reasons get invented why you won't get a clear run of successive days.

    I did it for a month and a half before it became obvious to me that it had to be all or nothing. One or the other; and since my reason to invest in a business was to get away from the idiotic management ideology that took hold after Thatcher's failed NHS reforms.

    The time inevitably comes when the decision on which of the options available to you will be the best and you have to follow your instinct.

    I can't tell you how liberating it was when I eventually took control of my destiny. That's not to say it was an easy ride for the first couple of years, but you learn from your mistakes, just as you do when you're a wet behind the ear teacher, thrown into a class of offensives brats and have to decide whether you'll swim or let them drown you.
     
  20. Sillow

    Sillow Lead commenter

    @Duke of York I hear what you're saying, and I have a view to running the business full time but it'll have to wait a few years, for various reasons. On the plus side, it is the kind of business where it is half-a-day of fixed time and the rest of it can be done when I'm able. Plus, my outgoings are minimal now I've kitted it out.

    Hard to explain while not wanting to out myself! But I'm giving it six months. If I don't see it working in that time, I'l give it up.
     

Share This Page