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How to improve Grade D student to a Grade C student by May?

Discussion in 'Mathematics' started by BWALSH479, Apr 5, 2012.

  1. BWALSH479

    BWALSH479 New commenter

    Traditionally we have far too many students achieving a grade D in their GCSE Maths..
    Can anyone advise on a useful programme that may assist in this regard?
    We use assertive mentoring, which involves Parents, form teachers and extra classes.
    We also use mymaths.co.uk. but still feel frustrated that so many are still missing out.
    We are a non selective secondary school.
    Thanks
     
  2. BWALSH479

    BWALSH479 New commenter

    Traditionally we have far too many students achieving a grade D in their GCSE Maths..
    Can anyone advise on a useful programme that may assist in this regard?
    We use assertive mentoring, which involves Parents, form teachers and extra classes.
    We also use mymaths.co.uk. but still feel frustrated that so many are still missing out.
    We are a non selective secondary school.
    Thanks
     
  3. Do you think that you may be doing "too much" for them and, as a consequence, they are not working themselves?
     
  4. Karvol

    Karvol Occasional commenter

    Do they want to do better? It is not enough that their teacher, their school or their parents want them to do better, but do they themselves desire to improve?
    Without that desire, nothing is going to change.
     
  5. BWALSH479

    BWALSH479 New commenter

    The answer is NO
    I believe that since the vast majority of our children are on free meals
    They deserve as much help and guidance that we can provide.
    Apologies for the sarcasm !
     
  6. I think you mis understand my question - I have no argument with you giving them help and/or guidance - my question was not a criticism
     
  7. So, you are saying that they are still doing plenty of work themselves - have you entered them for H or F
     
  8. Check your inbox - have messaged you.
     
  9. DeborahCarol

    DeborahCarol New commenter

    You may already be aware of these, but Collins publish 'Grade C Booster' workbooks. They're for 'Higher' and 'Foundation' (ie one book for both),and include occasional notes identifying what questions are needed for Higher only. You could have the students work through these, and, depending on size of group, fill in little 'gaps' with on-the-spot teaching for that individual, and identify common problem areas to teach the group?
     
  10. hammie

    hammie Lead commenter

    a very simple bit of advice from inset some years ago.
    When marking papers always give pupils a "to next grade" mark. e.g. 2 marks to a C grade. then get the pupoils to look for the silly mistakes, missed units, missed working marks.
    Once they realise that the missing marks have made the difference to the next grade they will actually start to look for them. Plus it is a real motivator when they realise that although they missed the grade that they wanted, they CAN actually achieve it.
    And of course, don't just tell them to check their paper at the end, teach them what to look for. if you have time, look at each pupil's paper for their most common individual way of losing easy marks.
    I Always type their scores into Excel and use conditional formatting to colour code each qyuestion (ridiculously easy to do on the newest version of EXCEL), you can set up the spreadsheet and get them to type in their own question, by question score. so weak questions show red, good questions show green or gold, useful individually and even more so if you do the whole calss on one sheet and total the scores on each question and by number/algebra/shape/data etc.
    When they arrive from primary they are usually used to "green penning" or highlighting their work to find improvements. It is a very useful skill that we should make time for in secondary.
     
  11. BWALSH479

    BWALSH479 New commenter

    Thanks brilliant
    Very helpful
     
  12. BWALSH479

    BWALSH479 New commenter

    Comments refer to Riley ed, hammie et al
     
  13. hammie

    hammie Lead commenter

    thanks riley ed
    i will take a look at that too!
     
  14. I teach a GCSE maths resit course in an FE college - the students who make it up to a C (or more in one or two cases) are those who grasp early on that they need it to carry on and they work hard for it.

    I can't emphasize enough the importance of high expectations and encouraging students to practice off their own back in their own time. All of my students have a target to do at least one maths question every day and to do more if they are in the mood.
    I get them to keep a maths diary (really just a short record of the maths they've done outside of the classroom) that I look at once a week or so and so they can see how much they have achieved as well - even with only one question a day they quickly improve!

    But I agree with the other posts on here that say it's the students who need to work for it - we can't do it for them. I'd say it'd be quite unusual in a resit group to get a C if they weren't self motivated/hard working.
     
  15. gchand

    gchand New commenter

    It's independent work that is the key.
    I staple a few questions from past exam papers together, teach them what they need to know to answer them and give it them for homework. The next lesson we go over the questions and the whole process is repeated EVERY LESSON. It creates responsibility and they love seeing that they got it right on their own.There will be some that will forget to do it or bring it but they will always be like that whatever method you use. Most soon convert when they see others enjoying success.
     
  16. Have you checked out http://numberloving.co.uk/ ? There are some really good ideas on there that aren't just 'doing more past papers'.
     
  17. Absurd as it might appear. I moved a pupil from a C to a B by having her change teaching groups. She was capable of a B but arriving from a 'Third World' country she was dumped in an EAL GCSE group! I badgered until my HOD agreed. She attained a B in English Lang and Lit.
    Three years later her parents still send me Xmas Cards!
    My neighbour's child uses the same site. She gets very little from the class lesson (noisy group) plus work on the site. She has recently started extra tuition at home and has gained confidence in Maths and arithmetic. This is not solution I agree but perhaps gives food for thought.
     
  18. ATW

    ATW

    Spoof exam papers have worked for me in the past. Get a past paper which has been completed by someone other than your students and then ask your students to mark it using the mark scheme set by the exam board. It will help them see what they need to do to achieve a higher grade. It is even better if the students have completed the paper prior to this because they can compare their own answers and look at how they can improve.
     
  19. http://bland.in/GCSE%20Maths/index.html

    This website could really be helpful - couple of exam papers but then exam papers by TOPICS :)
     
  20. We have a similar problem that we do alot of intensive work to get our students from a D to a C grade in Maths, I think the biggest problem that we found was that doing all of that with Year 11 was too little too late as they were already in a mindset that they couldnt do it and didn't really want to do the work. Starting with year 10 helps to break the cycle with the majority of students as they are used to this way of working and it gives them more time.
     

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