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How to conduct a re-integration meeting?

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by mature_maths_trainee, Feb 25, 2012.

  1. mature_maths_trainee

    mature_maths_trainee New commenter

    Following an incident with me, a student was excluded for two days and is now due to return to my class next lesson.
    Although there doesn't seem to be a formal system (at my new school), I would like to speak to the student beforehand to 'rebuild and start afresh'. I'm not sure if there has already been a formal re-integration meeting (with his parents/carer) or not - and I certainly don't know what happened or what was agreed. I suspect it didn't occur - nothing beyond a phone chat anyway.

    I've never had to do a (quite serious) re-integration chat before. Is there soem published guidance as to how I should conduct the process. Currently, I have no idea whether the student is in any way remorseful, or accepts that he will need to change his behaviour, or...
    I want to show some initiative in doing things professionally myself, rather than asking too many questions about what reintegration work has alreayd been done with the student (becuase that might be taken as implied criticism, if it turns out nothing has been done).

    As I say, I'm not really loking for detailed advice here - but hope that someone can point me to a website or other guidance that I can attempt to follow.


    Thanks in advance.

    MMT
     
  2. mature_maths_trainee

    mature_maths_trainee New commenter

    Following an incident with me, a student was excluded for two days and is now due to return to my class next lesson.
    Although there doesn't seem to be a formal system (at my new school), I would like to speak to the student beforehand to 'rebuild and start afresh'. I'm not sure if there has already been a formal re-integration meeting (with his parents/carer) or not - and I certainly don't know what happened or what was agreed. I suspect it didn't occur - nothing beyond a phone chat anyway.

    I've never had to do a (quite serious) re-integration chat before. Is there soem published guidance as to how I should conduct the process. Currently, I have no idea whether the student is in any way remorseful, or accepts that he will need to change his behaviour, or...
    I want to show some initiative in doing things professionally myself, rather than asking too many questions about what reintegration work has alreayd been done with the student (becuase that might be taken as implied criticism, if it turns out nothing has been done).

    As I say, I'm not really loking for detailed advice here - but hope that someone can point me to a website or other guidance that I can attempt to follow.


    Thanks in advance.

    MMT
     
  3. You need to speak to your school and find out what their policy is. You say that there doesn't nappear to be one - in my experience it would be unusual if there is nobody (SMT/HoY etc) who speaks to this student before they resume lessons. I would caution against trying to arrange a meeting with this student on your own.
     
  4. musiclover1

    musiclover1 New commenter

    Don't see thestudent on your own. I did this once and the student was not at all 'remorsefull'. If that happens to you, where do you go from there?

     
  5. Hi MMT

    I wrote about this here:


    http://www.teaching-strategies-for-classroom-discipline.com/conflict-resolution-activities.html

    after working in a school which had a great system set up for this purpose. Hope this helps.

    Good Luck
     
  6. Tom_Bennett

    Tom_Bennett Occasional commenter

    Good idea to have one.
    • Have a senior staff member present
    • Be positive AND firm
    • Tell the pupil you want the best for him
    • Tell him exactly what needs to happen in the future
    • Tell him what will happen if that DOESN'T happen.
    • Welcome him back to some extent. If he needs equipment etc sort that out. Make the reboot a fresh start.
    • Ask him what he thinks needs to happen for lessons to work.
    • Wish him luck. Firmly.
    Good luck
    Read more from Tom here on his blog, or follow him.
     
  7. BigFrankEM

    BigFrankEM Occasional commenter


    I have some problems with bullet points 1 and 8 above.

    The OP makes it clear that SMT support is far from evident.

    Whilst many posters here claim that "you just need to explain in words of one syllable to the SMT exactly what sort of support they should give you", this latter class of assertion does sort of beg the question.

    Point 8 is still more worrying, however.
    It offers an open goal to the child in question. Basically s/he is being given a carte blanche to attack you and your teaching as well as being implicitly given an equal status with you in terms of setting the tone for the classroom.

    A definite no-no as far as I am concerned.
     
  8. Tom_Bennett

    Tom_Bennett Occasional commenter

    Fair points. To clarify:
    No meeting should happen without backup- almost anyone senior will do- Hell, from almost any department. If SLT or HOL/HOY don't have the stones to do their job then my next advice is usually 'look for other schools because this one doesn't deserve you.'
    When I say, 'Tell me what needs to happen...' I don't mean some hideous invitation to get them to tell the teacher what to do, but to invite them to admit that in order for things to get better, they need eg to bring pens, not turn up late, not shout out etc etc. Basically getting them to admit how they need to behave, not how the teacher needs to behave. I can see how it could read that way, so fair enough, and thanks for pointing it out.
    Tom
     
  9. bigkid

    bigkid New commenter

    I am wondering whether you have any opinion on the actual advice offered. While I understand you taking issue with the phrasing of the advice (and to a certain extent have sympathy with your point) I think the advice is good advice.
    Someone in a position of expertise should offer good advice. Tom has done that in my opinion.
    The fact that he has phrased his advice in a way you don't like is an entirely separate issue.
    Not everyone is worthy of professional respect. If senior managers and heads of learning/department don't do their jobs properly wrt behavior then in that forum they lose my respect. I would still respect them as a human being (probably) and perhaps as a teacher (unless they had shown themselves unworthy of respect in those arenas too) but not as a manager/leader where behaviour or supporting colleagues is concerned.
    Are you suggesting that your posting style mirrors your style of communicating with children and young people? In that case you must call them facists and dinosaurs several times a day whilst offering them no suggestions at all about how they might move forward. Is this not a tad confusing for them?
    As I said before, the content of the advice is fine. If the SLT of a school cannot or will not support staff with behaviour issues then the staff ought to leave and find somewhere better to work. That is exactly the advice I would want people in the early stages of their teaching career to hear from an expert.
    Staff ought to be entitled to be trated with respect by staff and pupils alike and supported by their line managers if and when they are not. If this is not the case then teachers should find a school to work in where it is the case. Do you dispute that?
     
  10. If the relationship between yourself and this child has suffered so much that he did something that meant he was excluded, you both need to give and take in the re-integration meeting.
    You both need to learn from mistakes made previously and move forward so the situation won't escalate again.
    Good luck.
     

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