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how to be a bad friend - book recommendations please?

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by hsz06rgu, Apr 20, 2011.

  1. hsz06rgu

    hsz06rgu New commenter

    Hi, I was just wondering if anyone can recommend a really good book about how not to be a good friend for reception children?
    I want to cover friendship and thought I would start with a story about someone who is being horrible, and then go on to ask them what the person could be doing instead. Ideally I want a story which has a number of different scenarios in it, but my mind has gone blank!
    Thanks,
    Hs06rgu
     
  2. I don't know of any for this age group, but there are plenty (like Elmer) who don't want to be themselves and who are unhappy about being different. That might be a starting point ie what you like about yourself/what you like about others.
     
  3. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Immediate thought is the rainbow fish - who won't share so the other fish won't let him play
     
  4. fulloffun

    fulloffun New commenter

    The bear who wouldn't share .Sorry don't know the author but basically the bear is having a party and he eats all the cake.
     
  5. I've used a wonderful story calledThe Demon Teddy by Nicholas Allen...It has vocabulary in it like bottom and knickers which children love! Hope you can find a copy...
     
  6. The Selfish Crocodile by Faustin Charles and Mike Terry - he starts off being mean and not sharing his waterhole, but when he needs help he realises he needs friends, and by the end is friends with everyone!
     
  7. 'Mr. Pusskins' by Sam LLoyd. Mr. Pusskins is a bad-tempered cat who doesn't realise what a good friend his owner Emily is.
     
  8. I like 'It's Our House' Michael Rsen. The message is about sharing.
     

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