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How serious is failing one of the QTS standards?

Discussion in 'Trainee and student teachers' started by shineyboot, Mar 23, 2009.

  1. I just got my grade for my block practice and it was a pass but a fail on one of the standards. My tutor didn't explain what this meant and I'm confused. I know it means they will be looking for evidence that you have improved next time on the standard, but does this mean I'm likely to fail the course?

    I self financed my PGCE which I couldn't really afford in the first place and the thought of failing is just too depressing. I have not enjoyed the course but I have spent so much of my time and money on it now, I have no option but to pass even if I don't become a teacher.

    How serious is not reaching one standard, should I be worried? Please help as it is keeping me awake at night.
     
  2. I just got my grade for my block practice and it was a pass but a fail on one of the standards. My tutor didn't explain what this meant and I'm confused. I know it means they will be looking for evidence that you have improved next time on the standard, but does this mean I'm likely to fail the course?

    I self financed my PGCE which I couldn't really afford in the first place and the thought of failing is just too depressing. I have not enjoyed the course but I have spent so much of my time and money on it now, I have no option but to pass even if I don't become a teacher.

    How serious is not reaching one standard, should I be worried? Please help as it is keeping me awake at night.
     
  3. snowyhead

    snowyhead Lead commenter

    As you still have a final teaching practice to do you will have many opportunties to fulfill the standard you failed on. Your final practice will require you to teach at least 70% of a full timetable and you should be able to evidence almost every standard from it: some twice over. Don't loose sleep over it, speak to your personal tutor at Uni about your worries so that they can put your mind at rest.
    The final decision regarding the award of QTS lies with the GTC following recommendaton by your ITT. If you pass each practice, can provide evidence of achieveing the standards and pass the skills tests you have nothing to worry about.


     
  4. bessiesmith

    bessiesmith New commenter

    You can meet any of the QTS standards at any point during the course. Sometimes you will be at a placement school where it is impossible to meet some of the standards. For example, a friend of mine did her first placement at a school with no EAL students. This meant that she couldn't pass the standard about supporting EAL students during that placement. The university made sure her second placement was at a school where she could address this standard.
    Which standard was it? It might be something that you were unable to demonstrate at your first school simply because the opportunity didn't arise.
    Incidently, if there is any risk of you failing the course then the university will let you know - and tell you what steps you need to take in order to get back on track. They are not allowed to just turn around one day and say you have failed without any prior warning.
     
  5. Hi Bessie and Snowy

    Thanks for all the advice from everyone. I failed on behaviour management. I was observed in a games lesson and one child hurt herself (a sprain apparently) and I was unaware so the tutor told me she couldn't pass me because of this. I don't know how common it is to fail a standard or more? I don't have much contact with others on the course as I'm in school all the time and feel really alone and like I'm the worse person on the course.
     
  6. snowyhead

    snowyhead Lead commenter

    I'm assuming you're training for primary. Your behaviour management skills should be assessed over the course of a practice not judged on your ability in one lesson: PE is notoriously difficult to manage because the children just want to run around and I'm guessing that you were outside, relying on your voice carrying across open ground. Indeed, because of the implications of health and safety regulations in PE you should always be supported by a qualified teacher who has overall responsibility for ensuring all the children are safe. The important thing is you've learnt from this and will ensure that you enforce safety and behaviour expectations at the beginning of future PE lessons (Health and Safety: another standard to tick off).
    At the end of the day you are a student teacher ie 'exactly what it says on the tin'.



     
  7. First of all, don't panic!
    By the end of the PGCE you must have met all of the standards. To meet a standard is not just about ticking a box to say that you reached it once. Likewise failing a standard is not just about frailing it once in one lesson, to fail then you would have to consistently fail to reach the standard.
    The final evidence you present should show that the standard has been met over time across two key stages and consistently. As other posters have stated not all standards can be met in all schools at all times. A single lapse in behaviour management should not cause you to fail the whole course. Clearly in some subjects, like PE or Science or Technology health and safety is a key consideration. What you need to concentrate on in your next placement is ensuring that you correct the oversight, that is be more aware of pupils and what is happening. In practical subjects you almost have to grow a third eye to see what's happening all the time. As you gain experience this unseen third eye should develop.
     
  8. Chatterbox1607

    Chatterbox1607 New commenter

    What would you advise students to do when gathering evidence? I plan to do this over the easter and I am in my final year.
     
  9. Gathering evidence for meeting the QTS standards is about quality, not necessarily quantity. Your training provider should give you guidelines as to what they wish you to collect and if they have a suggestion for how many pieces of evidence are needed for any standard.
    But a few general pointers:
    1. Evidence can ciome from a variety of sources such as observations done on you, lesson plans, pupil work, attendance at parent evenings or events run in the school. It can also come from work you have done prior to ITT.
    2. Look at the guidance that accompanies the QTS standards, this tells you what the standard is about, its scope and the sort of evidence you might have.
    go to: http://www.tda.gov.uk/partners/ittstandards/guidance_08/qts.aspx
    click on a standard and you will see first the 'rationale' click on the tabs and you can see much more information. Look at what you have and see if it matches. The guidance really takes the standard apart and tells you what it means in practice.
    3. Devise a system - either a filing system or a way of linking to the evidence you have so that if asked for evidence of any particular standard you can find it easily. Some trainees use post it tabs in different colours to identify different groups of standards, writing the standard number on the tab, others have evidence files with sections for each standard.
    4. build up your evidence as you go through your teaching practice. But don't keep the evidence as static, if you have evidence for standard Q12 say, but next week you use a new way of assessing pupils in class that provides better evidence, then replacethe original or add to it.
    5. Talk with others on the course about what evidence they have and how they organise it. They may have evidence and be using it in a way that you hadn't thought of.
    6. Be prepared to write about the evidence and why you think it is high quality evidence, often evidence in the form of a piece of paper doesn't tell the whole story, for example evidence of being able to plan out of classroom experiences may take the form of a letter home to parents about a school trip that you went on. Write a short paragraph about what you have learned about the school policy on trips and how a risk assessment was conducted and the key things to remember when organising a trip. That would then be good quality evidence. Simply stating that you went on a school trip would not be high quality evidence.
     
  10. Conrad81

    Conrad81 New commenter

    What happens if your training school DO just turn around on assessment and say you have failed. Is there any recourse?
     

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