1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

How old where you when you had AH/DH/Headship?

Discussion in 'Headteachers' started by loopyfrog, Apr 27, 2013.

  1. loopyfrog

    loopyfrog New commenter

    A colleague and I were talking the other day about who might apply for the soon-to-be-vacant DP job in our school.
    We discussed the people from the age/experience group a bit ahead of us (40s) and agreed that they were the likely candidates.

    Then we discussed our immediate peers (early/mid 30s, 8ish years experience, HoDs) and came to the shocking realisation that the women would be unlikely to be considered but the men likely, despite the fact that the women are known to be outstanding teacers, less so the men.

    With this in mind, I wondered if I could do a quick survey to see if there's any merit in this hypothesis. So, if you wouldn't mind, could you tell me (roughly) how old you were when you got a AH position, a DH position, and/or a headship, and also your gender?

    Thanks
     
  2. loopyfrog

    loopyfrog New commenter

    A colleague and I were talking the other day about who might apply for the soon-to-be-vacant DP job in our school.
    We discussed the people from the age/experience group a bit ahead of us (40s) and agreed that they were the likely candidates.

    Then we discussed our immediate peers (early/mid 30s, 8ish years experience, HoDs) and came to the shocking realisation that the women would be unlikely to be considered but the men likely, despite the fact that the women are known to be outstanding teacers, less so the men.

    With this in mind, I wondered if I could do a quick survey to see if there's any merit in this hypothesis. So, if you wouldn't mind, could you tell me (roughly) how old you were when you got a AH position, a DH position, and/or a headship, and also your gender?

    Thanks
     
  3. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    Deputy 27 (4th school, had already done a term as acting head), 2nd deputy headship 33 (wanted to broaden my experience in a larger school, in a different setting) head 37. Female.
     
  4. loopyfrog

    loopyfrog New commenter

    Wow. Is that primary? When did you start teaching?
     
  5. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    Primary. Got my first teaching job in 1994.
     
  6. loopyfrog

    loopyfrog New commenter

    I wonder, do you think it's a different kettle of fish in secondary? There are a lot more staff generally in a school to select from. Or am I barking up the wrong tree?
     
  7. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    I've noticed over the years in primary that there are an increasing number of younger staff on SLT. I remember when I got my first DHT post it caused a bit of a stir - I was the youngest in a very large LA, and I really had to prove myself. Now I doubt if anyone would bat an eyelid. I think it takes longer to "work through the ranks" in secondary.
    I would add that experience, rather than age, is the most important factor. I was lucky to secure a senior teacher role in my third school. Which involved leading and teaching two key stages, in addition to several leadership roles and deputising for the head. I wouldn't have put myself forward for the DH role otherwise. I'm also glad that i moved to a new school with every promotion. I stayed in both DH roles for long enough to see the impact of the work I did, and develop a range of experience. I'm so glad I did. Headship is tough and not something I'd recommend rushing into.
     
  8. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    It used to be that in secondary most SLT were considerably older than in primary - not so much now. Here's my record, for the record (and I am secondary):

    First AHT - aged 30

    Deputy Head - aged 34

    First headship - age 38

    Second Headship - age 44.
     
  9. loopyfrog

    loopyfrog New commenter

    Are you male or female, Middlemarch? Do you think that makes a difference? I'm wondering if it's my own prejudice and not rooted in reality.

    What age, or rather, how many years of experience do you think are needed before the step into SLT?
     
  10. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    I think it's more about the range of experience you've had, and being able to evidence the impact you've had in your previous roles.
     
  11. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    Female!

    It varies, to be honest, though I'd advise everyone in secondary not to even consider it until they've got around 8 years under their belts. There's no rush and lack of experience can be the death knell for someone's career.

    Moreover, if people accelerate too fast into SLT - especially into headship - how are they going to sustain this until they're 65?

    Re the male v female thing - I can honestly say that I was never aware of any obstacle to my career presented by my being female. I don't have kids, mind.
     
  12. I would imagine comparing secondary to primary has little value. A secondary Head of Faculty may well be line manager to more staff than 2 primary heads combined, and yet wouldn't even be on SMT. Context is important, and pay (typically) reflects context.
     
  13. carioco

    carioco New commenter

    Oh dear Charles. This is quite untrue. A secondary head of faculty will not be line managing office staff, premises officer, cleaning staff, kitchen staff, lunchtime supervisors, crossing patrols etc.

    Back to the topic, DH at 30 after 8 years as class teacher. First headship at 35, second at 39, third at 45. Male, Primary, manage staff of 60 :)
     
  14. fennysnake

    fennysnake New commenter

    I feel really old.
    First headship 47, primary, female
    I taught abroad, took time off to look after my two children, changed from secondary to primary, worked part time for years, and really only started to think about my career (as opposed to job) when I hit 40.
    It wasn't the most planned of careers but I do feel really lucky in that I have been able to make all these choices, unlike my mother's generation whose choice between children and career was much more stark.
     
  15. Acting DHT (primary) a few weeks before my 24th birthday, by default being the only full time member of staff other than the head and the (then) substantive deputy.

    Don't even consider SMT before you are 30 (unless you want to burn out!).
     
  16. Saf114

    Saf114 New commenter

    I think you have fit a lot into your 47 years and done very well [​IMG]
     
  17. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    My view entirely. The rush to 'accelerate' through to headship is daft - it's too hard and stressful a job these days and no-one who gets a headship too young nowadays is going to last more than about 12 years in it.
     
  18. TLR 32
    AHT 33
    Advisor 34
    DHT 36
    HT 39
    nearing 41 wondering how to maintain working at this high octane, high pressure level till retirement.......?!
    Grey hair started at 39.
     
  19. I work in the primary sector. I became TLR after 2 years of teaching (aged 24), DHT two years later (aged 26), HT four years later (aged 30)
     
  20. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    Do you think you'll still be a head at 60? 65?
     

Share This Page