1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

how much does it change after NQT year?

Discussion in 'New teachers' started by neeny468, May 8, 2011.

  1. neeny468

    neeny468 New commenter

    Hi,

    I am in the final part of my NQT year now and am hoping someone can give me some positives to help me get through the rest of the year in one piece..

    I have gone through ups and downs this year and I know this is normal but I feel my NQT year has been mostly downs (periods of feeling really unhappy and claustrophobic) and ups which are pretty much just not downs.. I don't feel I have made much progress since last year and am not sure whether this is normal for an NQT?

    I am in a very challenging school and my year has pretty much revolved around behaviour management (which does not seem to be improving in most of my classes) and I do not feel I have been able to work on my actual teaching very much at all.. I have a couple of classes that I literally have not been able to teach a complete lesson to a year.. I feel we are now so far through the year that any attempts I am making to improve behaviour and control are a lost cause as the kids see me in a certain way and totally take the p*ss in lessons and there is no going back - to be honest I am finding the whole experience very depressing. People out of education just keep telling me to go to another school whereas people in school say it will improve next year as it will be my second year and the kids will automatically see me as 'not new' apparently the main reason why they persist in playing up this year? (I can't believe this is true and if so what magic thing is going to happen between now and september?...) I have looked at jobs but it would just feel like running away and to be honest I am not so sure starting out again in a new school would actually make any difference as behaviour seems pretty bad in most schools from what I can tell...

    I am really going through a bad patch this weekend as I watched a couple of videos of some VERY bad lessons I did on friday which are just embarrassing and show that I have absolutely no control in the classroom.. having worked so hard this year for the second year running (PGCE wasn't much better in terms of me time) and pretty much losing contact with friends and family for this dream career in teaching I just want someone to give me something positive to cling on to.. as at the moment I just feel like jacking it all in....

    sorry for the negativity I just can't get out of this funk... :(
     
  2. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    It is the weirdest thing, but it is true. If you are 'new' at any point in your career, you get a harder time than teachers who aren't. New and young is doubly hard.

    Seriously it will be easier for you to stay where you are next year than to start again.

    Your colleagues sound like they know what they are talking about, so stick with them. Great colleagues in a tough school is a better situation than nightmare colleagues in a good school.

    By all means keep an eye out for a post in a less challenging school, but don't rule out staying where you are. Actual teaching in the classroom gets easier and easier each year. I promise.
     
  3. littlemissraw

    littlemissraw Occasional commenter

    Minnieminx is right. Good colleagues make a school worth teaching in. I was in a good school and 95% of the colleagues were brilliant but there was one expletive who went out their way to make my life hell. Strangely enough it was the pupils who got me through it. I believe your second year should be far easier as lessons will be more tweaking than starting from scratch but I can't say for sure as I'm don't currently have a post x
     
  4. Starting in september in the same school does make a massive difference! I started in may last year in my current, so it was a bit a weird time of the year both for the kids and me to start a new post. But September, even with just a short experience in thatschool, I was much more confident because I knew exactly where I was going, I had already positive relationships with the kids. For the older one, they had taken it for granted that I was young but I was there, point, and other members of staff as well!
    And yes it does get easier and easier, and more and more enjoyable!!
    l'd say stay there, you might find it actually easier! And if it isn't the case, you can then start looking for another post.
    But I agree it's better to be in a tough school with good colleagues than in a fab school with annoying colleagues. One of my friend is in a very good school, not behaviour issues etc, but relationships between staff are not so good, everybody seem to be gossiping about anybody and there are only a few colleagues that she can actually trust. From all the stories she told me, I could not work in such an environment, even if the kids are fabulous...
     
  5. LOL Imagine what it is like being in a challenging school where colleagues gossip and snipe at each other.... I am looking forward to my second year but hoping to get a permenant post somewhere else. I couldn't face staying in my current school for another term after this one. never mind another year!
     
  6. I have been teaching 6 years and it gets easier every year (always been in the same school I trained at). I'm an established teacher, the kids know I am hardly ever off, that I follow through with the threats to call home and that I won't take their attitude lying down. In that sense it has been passed on through the clans in school that 'she's alright, she's a bit strict but fair' and I get much less hassle these days than I did when I started. A bit of age also helps (I'm assuming your secondary). I started teaching at 26 and I admit it seemed to be easier for me than some of the young teachers at 22.
     

Share This Page