1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

how many sublevels progress is expected in year 2?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by prettypony, Sep 15, 2011.

  1. I've been out of key stage 1 for a while, and come back to year 2 this year. My head is targetting all children to make 3 sublevels of progress by the end of the year. Usually 2 sublevels has been the norm.

    This seems a big ask. Is it a normal expectation?
     
  2. I've been out of key stage 1 for a while, and come back to year 2 this year. My head is targetting all children to make 3 sublevels of progress by the end of the year. Usually 2 sublevels has been the norm.

    This seems a big ask. Is it a normal expectation?
     
  3. just been told 2 full levels from yr 1 to yr 2



    ???????????????


    ***
     
  4. oh and also apparently a level 5 in ks 2 will only get a c grade at gsce
     
  5. We work in points at our school, where 4 APS points are good progress and 3 is satisfactory. 4 APS points is equivalent to 2 sub levels so I would say 3 sub levels seems excessive.
     
  6. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

  7. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    2 sublevels, but if you have a large number of children working at a low level one then they will be hoping for more. 2B is the national average for year 2, but if your 1c children only make their 2 sublevels - that still only gets them to 2c, so they're probably asking for 3 sublevels with the intention of getting as many 2Bs and above as poss. I know for some of mine, they're hoping for about 4 sublevels, talk about achieving the impossible!
     
  8. 2 sub levels in Year 1, 3 sub levels in Year 2.
     
  9. Down to the individual schools as to the expectations that they set in each year group. Ours is 3 sub levels in Y2 and 2 everywhere else because they come in to KS1 lower than average.
     
  10. We have to do 3 sub levels of progress in year 2.
     
  11. cally1980

    cally1980 Established commenter

    Ive also been told 3 sublevels in Year 2.
     
  12. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    3 sublevels is what they hope for in year 2 in my school as well...
     
  13. We like each child to move 2 sub-levels a year in our school. Apparently the national guidance is 3 sub-levels in 2 years though so that is 1.5 a year!
     
  14. Our school is very ofsted focussed. Unless we get 3 sub levels in year 1 and 3 sub levels in year 2 we can't be graded good or outstanding so we are all under immense pressure.
    If a child doesn't make the expected number of sub levels we have to make up that progress in the next year.....so I have some children in my year 2 class who need to make 5 sub levels progress this year!
     
  15. roise

    roise New commenter

    We use Target Tracker and that sets targets for 3 sub levels for Y2. However Y1 are not supposed to give a level above 2c as Y2 can't give a level above 3c.
     
  16. We have two make two whole levels from entry into Y1 to end of Y2. Some flexibility in that 6 sublevels have to be covered in KS1 so whilst 3 (Y1) +3 (Y2) would be ideal it's ok if it's 4 + 2 or 2 + 4. Not all children make their 6 sublevels over the KS but most do.

     
  17. Why not?
     
  18. Those of you saying your school want you to achieve 3 sub-levels in a particular year, is that based on your school's demographic/CVA score - so something like Fisher Family Trust 'D' levels? If not, what is it based on?
    It seems a very tall order?
     
  19. Indeed, why not?
     
  20. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Msz, your reply saying 2 full levels in the two years of KS1 made sense to me as otherwise in a school which was aiming at 2 or 1.5 sublevels per annum you'd have to enter year 1 with a pretty good level in order to achieve a level 3 at KS1.

    But how did you work that out from the link you provided? If national expectations are a 2b by the end of year 2, you are suggesting that you would enter Year 1 on a 0b (ok I know that doesn't exist) to get a 2b, on 0a to get a 2a, and on 1c to get a 3c. Does the government guidance you linked to say this? And this would be "average" progress.




     

Share This Page