1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

how many of you rotate your year 7, 8 and 9?

Discussion in 'Design and technology' started by jamajor, Jun 22, 2010.

  1. Are you timetabled so that the students can rotate between your areas every year or do you have to teach one area in year 7 and then one are in year 8 etc? I don't see how students can achieve their highest level if they do food and textiles in year 7 and 8 and them RM and graphics in year 9 (for example) as once they have reached year 9 they would obviously have no skills in RM and Graphics and would probably be doing the skills that they should have done in year 7. At the moment we are trying to point this out to the powers that be as we are unable to rotate through all areas in one year due to timetabling. What does everybody else do? Most schools i know do rotate.
     
  2. Are you timetabled so that the students can rotate between your areas every year or do you have to teach one area in year 7 and then one are in year 8 etc? I don't see how students can achieve their highest level if they do food and textiles in year 7 and 8 and them RM and graphics in year 9 (for example) as once they have reached year 9 they would obviously have no skills in RM and Graphics and would probably be doing the skills that they should have done in year 7. At the moment we are trying to point this out to the powers that be as we are unable to rotate through all areas in one year due to timetabling. What does everybody else do? Most schools i know do rotate.
     
  3. We rotate every term - 3 different areas a year. Try and mix it up as much as possible - we do Food, Product Design, Electronics and Graphics. As much as possible we try to do multi area projects - some projects may cover electronics and graphics for example or food with a product design element.
    Not perfect but at least we get to know most of the pupils before KS4 and they understand the different areas before choosing options.
     
  4. Why only rotate every year? Why can't one teacher teach Product Design covering most or all of the DT areas each year? With flexible staff this is the ideal solution.
    Make a stool or chair in RM and then make a seat cushion with the sewing machines?
    Make cakes in Food then package them using Graphics skills?
    Personally I think combining skills together makes DT much better and more cohesive for students.
     
  5. The problem here is if teachers do not have the skills of all four areas. It would be ideal but not every teacher would be comfortable teaching all areas. The skills required for each area are quite different. I wouldn't know the first thing about making a stool. I also do not feel it would be right to make teachers feel that they had to specialise in all areas. Some only took their PGCE or BEd in two areas normally food and textiles or RM and graphics. It's like saying someone who teaches MFL should teach all languages. The thing i was getting at was to see if other people are reasonably timetabled so that rotation could occur, even if it is not all staff it may be two opposites.
     
  6. We are timetabled for our year 7-9 rotations.We see 3 tutor groups that are spilt into 4 classes, they then rotate 4 times in a year (about 10 weeks each subject) so they end up with the teacher in their 1st or 2nd subject are.
    Each year we cover a food module, a textiles module and then Resistant Materials, Graphics, Electronics or systems and control in the other 2, either one full subject or a combination.
    We have looked into (but haven't started yet) where the students choose 2 of the subejcts to study for a year in year 9 before making their choice for their GCSE/BTEC.
    I hope that makes sense!
     
  7. thanks scoobychoo that does make sense and that's something that we could aim for if only the powers that be will let us
     
  8. We rotate 3 times and although most staff can cover 2 areas well at KS3 to do three dilutes expertise and skills we can teach the kids- LTC and the new NC means the cake making and boxes went out more than 10 years ago in my school!
    hmm upholstery and stools wonder when anyone last did that?
     
  9. I think it's quite arogant to belittle a simplified example.
    Product design is all about getting students to be creative and choose the appropriate material for the product they design. Merging subjects together is the essence of Product Design. If teachers are too scared to embrace other materials and try new things than I think perhaps THAT is old fashioned.
    Next you'll be saying women shouldn't be teaching RM....
     
  10. Hi all,
    Rotation of staff in yr7 staff keep one group all year to aid transition from primary. Some staff get worried and seek support from the team, gets them all talking about the subject,skills etc... Teachers deliver to yr7 textiles,food (Licence to cook),resistant materials. Teachers in the department openly have to work together and have a greater understanding of Technology as one subject. Student development in year 7 is much better than passing the students around always feeling like its a rush to finish the project, for the next teacher. You have them all year.
    Yr 8 &9 students move round areas where staff teach in there comfort zone.
    Has any one thought about vertical lessons
    ie 7 students from each year group in one class, at KS3, 21 students from mixed year groups.! Just and idea have done some mixed year group projects in the past 12months and it works quite well after students get heads round the idea and they all just seem to get on with it. has many positives...like role models, older student have to rasie the standards, yr7 usually keen to impress, target setting etc...
    PS if i want to make a cake is it wrong? if i make a stool is that wrong? if so then i think your wrong. Bring back the upholstered stool and real skills for me and my team. throw away the systmes part of the NC for me give it back to ICT..licence to cook is great lots and lots of cakes and meals... they will bring back how to iron next.
     
  11. Excuse me if I appear arrogant I did not realise it was meant to be a simplified example- trouble is we do not get much access to good detailed examples! As for women not teaching RM! far as I have seen in my career (sadly too long but very varied and far too many new things have been embraced, rejected by powers that be and re- embraced) women have been the most creative, innovative and effective.
     
  12. Totally agree with this - need all sorts of skills before they can design anything properly Year 7 rotation based on this with more designing in year 8- year 9s have chosed specialism so its a mix- as for ironing I threatened to get a kid to iron crumpled work last week! In textiles they iron seams flat etc!
     
  13. Yes we need to teach skills, but we need specialist teachers to pass on those skills... not teams who discuss what to do in a 20min break-or even an hour's meeting- then think they're fully equipped to teach it properly.
    Textiles is my 2nd subject- I passed O level (yes I'm that old!) and A level, and did a smattering on my PGCE. I know that I'm not as competent/ confident when I teach in this area. My job has been made harder by taking on a group of Y9s in Textiles who have been taught by non-specialists (Graphics Y7 & Food Y8) with much less experience than me. What do I do? Nearly all can't thread a sewing machine "Miss said we could sew everything by hand as its easier", many are gluing unfinished fraying fabrics together, they're bored of the subject and know that they get more specialist help from the technicians than non-specialist teachers.
    I'm not blaming the teachers as I've had to do the same in graphics & RM. Doing a spot of DIY at home doesn't make me as competent as a few years specialist training would!
    It's easy to accuse people of not being creative / enthusiastic / team players - having tried different teams and different teaching methods I remain cynical. I wonder if the poster who mentioned the upholstered stool would know their upholsterer's seam from a French seam. I know, I know... it was only an example! (In real life we'd discuss it & agree that it'd be easier for all pupils to use a simple pattern, a plain seam and a staple gun/ glue gun (as polished nails are too expensive)- resulting in the usual loss of skills.
    Just out of interest I'd be interested to know how many non-specialist staff who teach Textiles are comfortable with the different construction techniques (rather than just decorative techniques). If you are any hints or tips would be welcome!!
     
  14. Sorry jamajor,
    this is not a reply to this thread. I have just downloaded your woderful food poisoning powerpoint but cant access the slides with stuff from the internet. How can I fix it?
    Thanks
    Charlie
    dougandcharlie@btinternet.com

     
  15. Hi ,

    We rotate every class termly, there is only two of us in the department, I teach the RM, Electronic and System and Control side of D&T while my college teaches Food Tech, Textiles, we both try to incorporate Graphic based work in all our modules.

    Cheers
     

Share This Page