1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

How hard is it teaching mixed aged classes?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by Misstt, Feb 25, 2009.

  1. Hi all
    I am a NQT and have not had any experience of teaching mixed aged classes and so have avoided applying for those particular jobs when they come up. I know that jobs in my area are very sparse and don't want to limit myself but just feel I have no knowledge what so ever! Are classes taught dependent on ability and regardless of age? Or are objectives linked to year group thus meaning each lesson is really two mini lessons? I know some objectives link for certain topics but there must also be alot that don't. Also, how do you find planning?
    Sorry it's a bit long!
    Thanks
    Misstt
     
  2. Hi all
    I am a NQT and have not had any experience of teaching mixed aged classes and so have avoided applying for those particular jobs when they come up. I know that jobs in my area are very sparse and don't want to limit myself but just feel I have no knowledge what so ever! Are classes taught dependent on ability and regardless of age? Or are objectives linked to year group thus meaning each lesson is really two mini lessons? I know some objectives link for certain topics but there must also be alot that don't. Also, how do you find planning?
    Sorry it's a bit long!
    Thanks
    Misstt
     
  3. Hi
    Help!!! I am an NQT and have a mixed R / 1 class with very little support from anyone in school who knows about the new EYFS standards. My TA is not really efficient at delivering letters and sounds, and yet i cant do both sessions...I have tried running them together as 2 different phases but that just shortcahnges both year groups really, or they are sitting too long. help!!! What do I do?
    Thanks.
    Bec
     
  4. I decided recently to move to 2 phonics groups as not working whole class and decided I had 2 options:
    1 - Do 2 phonics sessions per day - 1 with R and 1 with Year 1. While a group was with you the other group could be working on phonics type activities (practicing letter formation/handwriting or games from Letters and sounds but no direct teaching) with your TA. Then swap.
    2 - As above, 1 group with you and 1 with TA but only 1 session per day. This means that each group would only work with you half the time but would mean that you still only do 1 phonics session and when you are doing that teaching the other group are consolidating with a TA. This is kind of similar to how my class are working at the mo. I take R or Y1, my TA takes the opposite and we each do a 20 min session. Any new teaching comes from me, work with my TA is more on rehearsal and consolidation. Out of 4 sessions a week I work with each year group twice which is not ideal but I know I could not fit 8 phonics sessions into 4 days!
     
  5. amjam

    amjam New commenter

    I have been teaching year 4/5/6 for 4 years now and its not as hard as you think - previously I taught one year group but the ability range was as wide as in my current class. Plan for the class and then differentiate the work for ability groups not year groups. The school's long term planning should ensure all areas are covered.

     
  6. Hello, in Montessori schools all children are taught in mixed age classes. (3-6, 6-9, 9-12, 12-15, 15-18) The teachers (guides/facilitators) observe each child individually and tailor presentations of new concepts to individual children or small groups. The great thing is that children watch and learn from each other, especially in mathematics and language, and you end up with older/able children working with and adapting materials whilst younger/less able children observe, reflect and eventually try for themselves. In this way all children have many teachers and endless opportunities to recall, revise and consolidate their learning; they build on what they already know and can do. A single teacher in a mainstream school would never the hours in a day to tailor/differentiate each concept for each child. Wendy Fidler: www.wildwoodmontessori.com www.montessorieducationforautism.com



     
  7. HI

    I've been teaching for many years but have taught in a village school for the last 5 in a mixed year 3/4/5 class.It's not easy, even with quite a lot of experience.Maths is definitely the hardest subject for me as I have 2 children working at level 2 and 2 at level 6. The other 25 are at various places inbetween. The key for me is to have a brilliant TA. Have you tried Hamilton Trust website? They have very good mixed age planning. My other advice would be to see if you can go and watch someone in a similar situation. I did that in my first couple of weeks and it's the little organizational things that really helped me.
     
  8. Hi

    I have a mixed class of year 3/4/5. maths is definitelly the hardest area to tach as I have 2 children working at level 2 and 2 at level 6. the others are all somewhere inbetween. I have quite a lot of experience but it really isn't easy. My bigest asset is a fantastic TA. have you tried Hailton Trust for some good mixed age planning? My best advice would be to go and watch someone in the same situation. Sometimes it is little organisational ideas that you can pick up that makes the diference.
     
  9. Course taught in mixed age groups are much harder and more problematic than in regular classes of the same age. It requires more perseverance, patience, planning and love for children. But the result of training and development will be much better than a simple class It is believed that the wider range of competences is shown in a mixed age group, the more opportunities open to members of the group - the development of relations of friendship with those who are most impressed; complement their style, needs; sharing interests with the members of the group. The greater the diversity of the group (depending on the age - competence, maturity, experience, and education) in order to effectively develop its members. A mixture of ages in the classroom is particularly desirable for the lower age group of children, this interaction increases the motivation of young children and self-confidence. Cognitive and social development of children in mixed age groups leads to the development of friendly relations and expansion of informative knowledge to fix the older children, social development, which is under threat.

    https://essaycool.com
     

Share This Page