1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

How does your school manage depressed students?

Discussion in 'Secondary' started by Henry401, Jan 3, 2012.

  1. Sorry if this isn’t in the correct forum section, I was not
    sure where to post.


    Recent events at my school have been very eye opening
    regarding the problem that is teenage depression. The school is a high
    achieving independent school, where most pupils are doing very well.


    Recently, a pupil (in upper sixth) shared their concerns
    about what strategies are in place to help pupils who are depressed. There is
    none of which myself or pupils are aware. This particular pupil had attempted
    suicide in the past and also knew other pupils who had. I was shocked as I would
    never have even suspected it from that particular pupil.


    I would be very grateful if you could share the
    strategies/systems that are in place in your school.
    Senior team are now fixing this, but i'm still interested in what happens at your school.




    Thanks,


    http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Depression/Pages/Introduction.aspx
     
  2. Sorry if this isn’t in the correct forum section, I was not
    sure where to post.


    Recent events at my school have been very eye opening
    regarding the problem that is teenage depression. The school is a high
    achieving independent school, where most pupils are doing very well.


    Recently, a pupil (in upper sixth) shared their concerns
    about what strategies are in place to help pupils who are depressed. There is
    none of which myself or pupils are aware. This particular pupil had attempted
    suicide in the past and also knew other pupils who had. I was shocked as I would
    never have even suspected it from that particular pupil.


    I would be very grateful if you could share the
    strategies/systems that are in place in your school.
    Senior team are now fixing this, but i'm still interested in what happens at your school.




    Thanks,


    http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Depression/Pages/Introduction.aspx
     
  3. bigpedro

    bigpedro New commenter

    I'm afraid that it is becoming far more common to see students in school who suffer depression. Im sure that these students have always been there but it is sadly (call my cynical if you like) becoming more fashionable to have emotional issues. In some ways this is a positive thing as it may encourage many who would traditionally have avoided the issue to face it and seek help. I fear however that it is a very easy thing to fake.
    My wife was recently under a councellor due to depression after she did some serious soul searching and admitted it. But i suspect that after an hour or so googling depression and its effects I could fake it pretty well and certainly enough to raise the concerns of your average untrained school teacher.
    As for what to do, our school councillor (yes, we have one on site) is very good and works closely with the students and their parents to sort out issues as best they can and she is a useful first step on the road to dealing with the condition.
     
  4. sleepyhead

    sleepyhead New commenter


    Very very badly. I have a student in my year 13 form who is meant to
    be repeating the year. She got to about October of her last year 13
    and then stopped coming to lessons. At that time, I was just her Lit
    teacher, and it took weeks and weeks of me asking what was going on for
    anyone senior to contact home. Turned out she was refusing to get out
    of bed...
    Fast forward (!) to March and she's still not back.
    Eventually, the school councillor was able to talk to her and things
    slowly started to pick up. By June, she was coming in to school for the
    social side, but not planning to do exams. September comes around and
    she's in every day for a few weeks, then vanishes. I've not seen her
    since.
    Councillor was made redundant in the summer and this
    student falls between the stools of child and adult mental health so
    gets precious little support. It pains me that we seem unable to help
    her - or anyone else in the VI form. I was told quite clearly by the CP officer that
    there is no provision for "that kind of thing" for post-16 students - if
    she'd been in year 11, it would have been a different matter.
    I
    certainly think that there are a few people who like all the drama and
    support they get for having emotional issues - we have a reknowned
    system for dealing with them, apparently - but this young lady has a
    serious mental health problem which I think we have failed to help
    with. She is meant to be under our care, and that makes me feel very
    sad and angry.
     
  5. When I was in 6th form (left in July 2010) i had personal issues related to things going on at home. Although i tried my best to keep going i needed help. But the school ignored me because i wasn't in yr11 or lower. They had an on-site counsellor but she refused to see me without my parents permission once i hit year 12. Now i'm at university and thankfully the counsellors here have helped me through, but it should have been resolved in year 12. Provisions in schools, especially for post 16 pupils, is poor and needs to be dealt with.
     

Share This Page