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How do you use your school grounds to create learning opportunities?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by tonymillar, Feb 10, 2012.

  1. tonymillar

    tonymillar New commenter

    I am interested in hearing ways that you use your school grounds to create learning opportunities.


    My favourite example is a water butt - curriculum, geography rainfall, maths, volume and surface areas, Eco Schools, water topic, an example of rainwater harvesting and so on. Use the water on the vegetable patch, it can link to Healthy Schools and is a simple example of learning outside the classroom. Multi gains, the possibilities are endless.
     
  2. tonymillar

    tonymillar New commenter

    I am interested in hearing ways that you use your school grounds to create learning opportunities.


    My favourite example is a water butt - curriculum, geography rainfall, maths, volume and surface areas, Eco Schools, water topic, an example of rainwater harvesting and so on. Use the water on the vegetable patch, it can link to Healthy Schools and is a simple example of learning outside the classroom. Multi gains, the possibilities are endless.
     
  3. polly.glot

    polly.glot New commenter

    French - give them a treasure hunt list of things to find as a team - une pierre, une feuille jaune etc.
    History - make a timeline to show, literally on the ground, the duration of time since, for example, humans came out of Africa. They are blown away to measure out the time since they were born/WW II/Henry VIII/the date of the village church/the Romans in Britain/the last Ice Age .....all the way back to Out of Africa. really puts the past in to context.
    Battle renactments - many a time the Romans have taken on the Britons at the Medway, wearing costumes made by themselves, the steps of the battle carefully orchestrated by me. The river can be the school drive.
     
  4. funambule

    funambule New commenter

    Using the resources for `On the Snail Trail' in French, German, Italian and Spanish. This is a cross-curricular CLIL project (content and language integrated learning); in this case integrating languages with science.Finding a particular variety of snails in the school grounds, recording and logging the data here:
    www.evolutionmegalab.org
    You will find all the resources and further ideas you need here:
    www.linksintolanguages.ac.uk/resources/2528
    and here are the teachers' notes and display material:
    www.primaryupd8.org.uk
    The project has won a major European award and national awards for Spanish and Primary Languages.
    Contact jan.lewandowski@bedford.gov.uk for more details.
     
  5. tonymillar

    tonymillar New commenter

    How fascinating. I would have never expected that links to languages and history would have been contained in the first examples of how school grounds can be used.


    The snail projects look great and the learning opportunities diverse. For some reason the links are not working, so I have listed them again below


    Evolution MegaLab


    On the snail trail


    primaryupd8



    Thank you for your contributions so far and I look forward to hopefully reading some more great ways to use school grounds
     
  6. We have a "forest school" on site and once a week as part of the curriculum my children spend a session outside. We have built anderson shelters as part of WW2, grown our own potatoes and cooked them outside once they were ready. We use natural materials to create patterns link to symmetry etc in maths. We use our knowlege of coordinates to form a battle group. Use the space for performance poetry linked to Christini Rossettis poems the wind. Use materials we find to create a large replica of a picture we are given eg: a butterfly, a car. We measure perimeters and areas. We have laminated timeline cards and use the space outside to order events. We replicate solids, liquids and gases....the list is endless
    PS: sorry about the jumbled mess, just a few ideas quickly listed for you.
     
  7. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    We timetable 10% of learning outdoors as a minimum. 50% in eyfs. We have 2 outdoor classrooms, plus dens and willow sculptures and structures and an allotment. We also go out into the local community to improve the environment as part of a cohesion project.
     
  8. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    We have two outdoor classrooms and a school allotment where we grow a range of fruit and veg. We have just planted an orchard. There are a number of wild areas around the school grounds to provide habitats for wildlife. We also have Forest Schools with activities covering anumber of curriculum areas. The Woodlandtrust website is a good source of ideas.
     
  9. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Nearly forgot we have our own mini weather station linked to others across the area
     
  10. funambule

    funambule New commenter

    Thanks for redoing the links.
    One of the points about using languages in the school grounds is that it makes for `memorable learning'. We videoed children hunting for snails and recording - the excitement was palpable. With luck they will want to do more language learning in the future!
     

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