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How do you use phoneme spotters without an IWB?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by minnieminx, Feb 4, 2012.

  1. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    I don't have a board that is interactive, so children can't come up and circle/underline various spellings for the phonemes.

    Currently I display it and read through and they jot down how many words they hear with that sound. Or they jot down the words in columns for the various spellings. But it never seems interesting, just them jotting on whiteboards. Occasionally I print them out and pairs use highlighters to 'spot' the phonemes.

    More active ways to use phoneme spotters would be fab please.
     
  2. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    Some sets of phoneme sounds (laminated to last) placed in the middle of the table. As children 'hear' the phoneme, they place the appropriate card in a pile in front of them (play in pairs to cut down on resources).
    If they're well disciplined have a different phoneme sound on each table group. As children spot the sound , they go to stand round the appropriate table. (Can spot who's fast and who's slower at this for AfL too)
    That's all that immediately springs to mind.
     
  3. I have made phoneme mats with the sound and a familiar illustration from our phonics scheme for playing phoneme spotting. Lower ability or those just starting, have a mat with just set 2 sounds, but the top group have all sounds and not only have to spot the sound, but also the correct spelling. The mats are also useful when the children are writing.
     
  4. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    Love this idea as they could play phoneme spotting bingo.
     
  5. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    So do they 'spot' different sounds depending on ability?
     
  6. ictgames have a phoneme bingo
     
  7. How about providing children with cumulative texts on paper so each child can do his or her own 'spotting'!
    I am incredulous at the lengths teachers seem to go to avoiding paper and pencil for teaching children to read and spell and write!
     
  8. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    I am trying hard not to be hugely offended by this. I have not said anywhere at all that I want to avoid pencil and paper. I did even say that sometimes I do give out paper copies and children work in pairs to spot phonemes.

    I simply asked for other ideas as well.
     
  9. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I use text as Debbie suggests the children circle/highlight/underline.
    Tthe words containing the sound we are working on then write them in their phonics books. If we are looking at different ways of representing the same sound the children sort the words into the correct spelling pattern on a grid.
     
  10. Ramjam

    Ramjam New commenter

    I use text with circle, highlight or underline too, ( I wish they did multipacks of yellow so the more enthusiastic don't toally obliterate the words like they do with blue highlighters!) but I like the idea of phoneme bingo or match. It helps children spell if they have a 'picture' of the word they are spelling . Lots of adults who CAN spell check some words by seeing if it looks right.
     
  11. upsadaisy

    upsadaisy New commenter

    I have no clue what this is, but in regards to it being an interactive issue. Could they not blu-tack something to the board? Counters? Or use dry wipe pens on it? Could you make acetate sheets to use on it? And I often have the kids use my laptop to do stuff as their sweaty hands find it hard to move things on the smart board. (I used to have a board that had a stylus and that was much better.)
     
  12. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    SUCH a sensible idea...yes they could.
    I'd be shot at dawn!
    I used to do that, but my year 2 can't manage a mouse mat and click the button on the laptop with any degree of accuracy.

    Thank you all.
     
  13. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    can you not plug in a mousefor them to use
     
  14. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Yes if I bought a mouse...can't be spending money on such naff things when I have a new fairy door for Little Red Riding Hood to visit.
     
  15. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    could you "borrow" one from a desk top computer in the school?
     
  16. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    LOL. No because I am the kind of teacher who would then make stroppy requests in the staff meeting for the return from whoever has thoughtlessly taken a mouse from the ICT room, meaning my class have to share computers between three or four. Then I remember three days later it was me.
     
  17. upsadaisy

    upsadaisy New commenter

    LOL, mine are Year 1!

    As for my comment about drywipes, I wasn't sure what surface you are projecting onto. Also just a thought, we have wireless mouses (mice?) and keyboards that are great. The children in my class think I'm magic when I type onto it and it appears on the board and I'm not near the computer.
     
  18. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Fair enough...that level of technology always seems like magic to me as well. Apart from on the days when I think about it too much and it scares the hell out of me!
     

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