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How do you plan for / promote good behaviour in your class

Discussion in 'Primary' started by TEACHER16, Dec 19, 2010.

  1. TEACHER16

    TEACHER16 New commenter

    This is something I am working towards in my teaching as an NQT...and wanted to hear other words of wisdom :)
     
  2. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    You're trying to promote good behaviour and discourage bad, so sometimes, if it's possible, it's as well to 'overlook' i e 'not see' some minor attention-seeking disruptions. Lots of praise and 'stick' when necessary.
    If you do have cause to pull up a child for his/her behaviour, try and find a reason to 'catch them being good' as soon as you can.
    But really it all depends on your personality-some things work for you and some things don't. I'm quite a 'disciplinarian' setting high standards, who's also a bit of a 'dramatist' in the classroom and when I had a student last year, she tried copying my techniques. Now she was a quiet, reserved type and my techniques didn't work for her, she needed to work out some of her own. So watch as many different teachers as you can and then think which suit MY personality? You'll have lots of opportunity to try them out on TP and then walk away if they don't work.
    Best of luck, teaching can be a super rewarding career but you never stop learning- I gain so much from younger colleagues.
     
  3. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Don't give them the opportunity to misbehave. Be there on top of them each and every minute of the lesson. Make sure they are busy all of the time on useful and worthwhile learning activities. If they are bust learning, they are less likely to misbehave.

    Go totally over the top with praise and rewards. Stickers (Especially tiny dot ones) are cheap but well valued. When things are going well say things like 'Wow, look how fabulously we are working. I do hope someone comes in and sees our excellent class. They will be so proud.' (Yes you might feel a bit silly and think it is all a bit OTT sometimes, but it helps.) Show good work to the rest of the class and make a big deal of it. Send them to show good work to the head.

    Conversely also go a bit OTT sometimes with your reaction to bad behaviour. Think about the things you really, really do not want to see in your classroom. For me it is children being mean or bad mannered. Anyone who is rude or nasty is told off very very sternly and sent to sit by themselves, usually on the floor as there is little space in the room, while I then go a bit overboard with the sympathy for the recipient of the bad behaviour. Before the child comes back to join the class they have to apologise to the recipient of their bad behaviour and ask if the class will welcome them back. (They always do, but hey it is good for the child to know it isn't automatic.)


    This is something a lot of NQTs work on and I definitely didn't have it sussed at that point in my career. I cringe when I remember some incidents from that year. But you are absolutely right to want to work on prevention. Behaviour management is definitely a concept where prevention IS better than cure. Good luck..
     
  4. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Sorry...loving my new laptop and google chrome, but haven't worked out paragraphs yet.
     
  5. skellig1182

    skellig1182 New commenter

    I used to work on keeping them busy every second and making sure there was no time to misbehave. However this year, i've worked on developing my classes patience and ability to sit silently when needed. They can sit without saying a single word. They came in quite lively with different behaviour problems like walking around and fussing about, but now they are amazing. We can do handwriting in silence for 20 mins and they are only year one. No one speaks or makes a noise during transitions to tables. They walk around with fingers on their lips. Everyone in my school has now commented on their wonderful behaviour. I didn't try to avoid unwanted behaviour in the beginning. During the first half term, my focus was mainly on how to behave, practising good behaviour, and literally pulling up everything i didn't feel was respectful or exceptable. I was very honest with them and said they were old enough to do this and it has worked.
    My advice is be strong and firm, the classroom is yours and if they want to be there having lots of wonderful rewards then they have to adhere to your rules (rules that make their learning, safety and enjoyment better). They always need to know why your asking them to behave a certain way.
     
  6. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Definitely. I forgot to mention this part. PRACTISING the behaviour you do want. And talk lots about 'this is what we do in our class because we are a good class who can manage it.'
     
  7. TEACHER16

    TEACHER16 New commenter


    Thank you all for your replies they have helped me so much. What if a child challenges the behaviour in your class? What do you then do?
     
  8. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    I regularly use Behaviour charts;goals in net, netballs in the hoop, carriages on a train, segments of a worm etc -depends on interest of the child. We agree together a commitment to 'behave in a certain manner', e g I will try to keep my hand and feet to myself / iwill try to ask another child before running to teacher saying |I can't do it etc you get the idea. Then each day if they've achieved the behaviour by getting 5 ticks they can colour in a goal/ carriage/ segment. When the whole thing is coloured they get to take it home as a celebration of their achievement.
     
  9. TEACHER16

    TEACHER16 New commenter

    Do you do that for each child? What would you do for older children? Thank you so much for your reply...this has helped me a lot with some fresh and new ideas :).
     
  10. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    Yes and each 'behaviour success criteria' is personal to that child.
    I've used these over the years with years 3-6.
     
  11. I sometimes find that with older ones (mainly boys but not always) they don't want to lose face in front of their friends so find it difficult to 'back down' once they have been cheeky or rude or decided that they 'can't be bovvveeerrdd' to do their work. I usually get very close to them, use a quiet voice and tell them <u>exactly </u>what i <u>expect</u> them to do within the next 2 minutes.
    I am not a loud, shouty person by nature and half the kids are bigger than me so i often find that giving them the chance to recover their own behaviour works out best without all the drama. Of course i also always follow up with the consequences if they choose not to comply.[​IMG]
     
  12. I have found that most children don't need reward chart type things (apart from key children), they respond well to clear boundaries and explaining WHY they can't/can do something. The children enjoy being involved in setting class rules (you can always direct this to a point but they are usually very good at coming up with everything) and agreeing appropriate consequences (they are often much more harsh than you would be). It's alot harder for a child to argue with you about something which they and their peers have created and agreed on.
    Of course there's also the very effective positive praise but I'm sure you already do that (just make sure it is always meaningful and not overdone-especially with the older children)
    Good luck!
    PS Not criticising anyone who does use reward charts/systems, it's just my schools policy not to and after initially being very sceptical, I don't think I would go back to my old ways now!
     
  13. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    Agree only only use occasionally for children who need extra help.
     
  14. TEACHER16

    TEACHER16 New commenter

    Do you keep the same one target until it is achieved or add new ones as they arise?
     
  15. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    Sometimes the child might have 2 targets, but idea is for child to succeed, so has to be achievable within the set time limit and then be off the sheet.
     
  16. skellig1182

    skellig1182 New commenter

    For me, it always depends on the level of disruption. If it's low level then normally I move their name down on the behaviour/golden time chart where they lose minutes. Then if it doesnt work, they will miss some minutes of play time that day. If those strategies don't work then i have my TA/next doors TA come and take the child out and sit next door for 10 mins. I also have a time out chair which i use when i want a child to stop disrupting during carpet time. It really depends on the child and the behaviour. Chn respond so differently to different behaviour strategies. If a child is really challenging me infront of the other children however, they will always be sent out straight away. It works wonders on the rest of the class too.
     

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