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How do you make your application stand out?

Discussion in 'Scotland - education news' started by JoW82, Jun 17, 2011.

  1. Hi, I'm looking for a bit of advice. I have currently been applying for jobs (about 30+) in different areas and have so far received 'thanks but no thanks e-mails' via myjobscotland. What I would like to know is how do I make my application stand out? There are hundreds of applicants for each post and it just seems impossible! I try to tailor the application to suit the job profile/person spec and I have tried writing in prose as well as using bullet points but have got absolutely no where! Anyone out there have any hints, tips or golden rules that I'm missing??? Whole process is rather frustrating as it is all online now so you can't seem to put anything in bold or underline anything to make it stand out. Any advice would be much appreciated :) Thanks!
     
  2. Hi, I'm looking for a bit of advice. I have currently been applying for jobs (about 30+) in different areas and have so far received 'thanks but no thanks e-mails' via myjobscotland. What I would like to know is how do I make my application stand out? There are hundreds of applicants for each post and it just seems impossible! I try to tailor the application to suit the job profile/person spec and I have tried writing in prose as well as using bullet points but have got absolutely no where! Anyone out there have any hints, tips or golden rules that I'm missing??? Whole process is rather frustrating as it is all online now so you can't seem to put anything in bold or underline anything to make it stand out. Any advice would be much appreciated :) Thanks!
     
  3. Hi Jo - I'm also in the same situation as yourself in that I've applied for about 30 or so jobs. So far I've heard back from roughly half of those and to date I've secured 8 interviews (including a PT interview). Granted, I have a fair bit of experience so that may count in my favour but at the same time I'm at the top of the pay scale which brings it's own obstacles (I won't bother getting into that here as it's been covered in many other parts of the forum!) What I find works for me is simply having a number of headings and just writing a shortish paragraph or two explaining what I've done with a couple of examples. The headings are:-

    Personal Qualities
    Values
    Curriculum delivery and development of schemes of work
    Attainment and assessment
    Learning and Teaching
    ICT
    Pupil Support
    Communication and Teamwork
    Classroom Management
    Classroom Environment (I just say what I would like my class to look like)
    Resource Management
    Planning
    CPD
    Extra-curricular
    Pre-teaching experience (for example, working with children out-with school)
    Pre-teaching work experience (I worked in the private sector for about 8 years before going into teaching)
    Closing Statement (a general summary of why you think you would be right for the job)

    So far this seems to be working well for me so I hope this might give you some ideas. PM me if you need me to elaborate any further on any of the headings. Hope this helps.
     
  4. This website hates me - it never properly formats what I post :(
     
  5. Hi Denzel - Thank you so much for the advice. I have used headings in previous applications but the headings you suggest are probably worded better than mine. I have only been teaching (primary) for two years so still relatively new. Thanks again for the help and I will try this for future applications as it seems to be a winning formula. :) Still to hear from other applications so will just keep fingers and toes crossed!
     
  6. Advice 1: Don't fall into the trap that 100's of people are applying for <u>every</u> post you apply for. Sometimes there may be very few applicants - you just don't know.
    Advice 2: You don't always have to apply on line. Ask for an electronic version of the job application form to be e-mailed to you.
    Advice 3. Bullet points are good - avoid too much waffle.
    Advice 4: Always demonstrate why you are most sutable for the post. (Don't just say you can do something - explain how you can and what the outcomes were.
    Advice 5: Don't give up


     
  7. Thanks Monkeymarch - much appreciated. Having failed to secure a single interview will just need to try and get as much supply as possible. Enjoy the hols!
     
  8. I have been experiencing a similar problem. Over the last 3 years I have applied for about 200 jobs and am still in search of the elusive full time permanent job. This year I asked my colleagues who have recently been accepted for posts to give me pointers. They showed me their applications and interestingly they didn't have headings. It appears some schools like certain formats and some others. I had tried to keep my applications quite brief and to the point, but they suggested putting in more specific examples. Hopefully we will find jobs soon. Good luck!
     
  9. At the end of my probation year a year ago , at one of our meetings we were given some really helpful advice by one of the Heads;
    -Always look at the essential and desirable qualities on the job spec and try to include examples of your desirable qualities on your application form
    -Always bullet point with headings
    -Although you are applying for a post in a specific subject ,try to include examples of teaching and activities outwith your subject (e.g form class ,RE,organising trips ,extra-curricular)
    -Don't try to squeeze everything in ,you want to be given the oportunity to develop your points at interview
    -If you are an older entrant (like myself) include previous transferrable skills
    Hope this helps.
     
  10. Bullet points are for lists of short items. Don't bullet point a whole application as much of what you have to say will be complex information much better communicated in sentences and paragraphs.
     
  11. I had previously been bullet pointing, but the latest advice I have been given is not to!
     
  12. I looked recently at those new online aplication forms. NIGHTMARE! There isn't the space to say very much at all! It used to be that the supporting statement was the most important part of the application - where you could really get across your strenghts and ethos. Now you hardly get the room to say very much at all. So to me it seems really so difficult to make the app stand out when it has to be so brief and to the point. No room to give a bit of the perosnal ethos which to my thinking is really important. My guess is that it is because there are so many aplicants that they don't have the time to read too much. But extremely unfair to the applicants.
     
  13. I think the best bet is to say as much as possible in the work experience part about things you've done and initiatives you've been involved in, as that way you can just briefly refer to it in the personal statement rather than all out detail that takes up a lot of the measly 4000 characters.
    I personally would not bullet point, as I've been advised against it in the past, but make sure you're not forgetting to take a new paragraph every now and then, or it makes it extremely difficult to read.
     
  14. Having had to short leet 130 applications to 20 - here's my Tuppenceworth:

    Show that you like working with children - you'd be surprised how often this aspect is neglected - when talking about teaching and learning what're your values- don't list but give next scenario that illustrates your values e.g supportive classroom wher children aren't afraid to have a go.

    Always do work in word and then paste
    Always use headings
    Link these either to question asked or GTC standard
    Always have someone else proof-read to check for errors
    Use any courses or professional reading to show impact on your work
    Don't just list something ( e.g I have used a range of AfL strategies- tell me what worked- never leave the reader with a 'so what?' what did you do/learn/ change/develop as a result of...
    Think of a ripple effect - what you did and the effect on pupils/ school/parents/ wider community

    Include all relevant detail and anything that shows you off in a good light - don't worry about leaving something for interview - we'll ask you to elaborate :)

    Disclaimer: done on phone with wee screen- not practised what I preached re: proof- reading

    Good luck! It's a difficult situation at present bit try to stay positive.
     
  15. Don't just say what you have done, explain what impact the things you have done have had on the children. Bullet's worked for me but depends on the person reading it, some people like bullets some don't, so find a style that suits you and displays your abilities, values and knowledge to the optimum
     

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