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How do you get started with private tutoring and what is the nature of the work?

Discussion in 'Private tutors' started by Sylviathedog, Jan 4, 2011.

  1. I've been a Primary supply teacher for many years. I love it and until recently saw no reason to do anything different. However, there is virtually no work out there now so I'm forced to look at alternatives. I registered with the government's one-to-one tuition programme in the summer, have heard nothing (apart from an acknowledgement) and don't expect to now. So, how do you get started? Is private tuition mainly for Secondary-aged rather than Primary-aged children? What are the rates of pay? Is the work mainly based around studying for entrance exams or is it helping those who are struggling? Is there any LEA funded work around (for children who are off school long term) or is it all funded privately by the parents? Also, what are the hours like? Is it mainly after-school and evenings or can it take place during the school day?
     
  2. I've been a Primary supply teacher for many years. I love it and until recently saw no reason to do anything different. However, there is virtually no work out there now so I'm forced to look at alternatives. I registered with the government's one-to-one tuition programme in the summer, have heard nothing (apart from an acknowledgement) and don't expect to now. So, how do you get started? Is private tuition mainly for Secondary-aged rather than Primary-aged children? What are the rates of pay? Is the work mainly based around studying for entrance exams or is it helping those who are struggling? Is there any LEA funded work around (for children who are off school long term) or is it all funded privately by the parents? Also, what are the hours like? Is it mainly after-school and evenings or can it take place during the school day?
     
  3. Word of mouth is the best way but you could advertise in the local paper.
    I think it is more common in secondary because of the high-stakes exams like GCSEs and A-levels. There is also more of a culture of it in secondary schools and some schools will recommend a tutor if they feel a student has a weakness they may be struggling to address in school for a number of reasons.
    Not sure for primary, you set your own fees.
    I'd say mainly entrance exams but I'm not sure with primary.
    I've only ever known it funded by parents.
    Pretty flexible depending on what you are able to do yourself.
    Mainly after school unless you're working with home schooled kids.
     
  4. From a primary point of view.

    There are lots of ways to get started. You could register on First Tutors, advertise in your local paper or distribute leaflets. Once you have a couple of students, word of mouth should keep you in demand.

    I only tutor KS1 & KS2 and have not had any issues securing students. There are an increasing number of families taking tuition at primary level, primarily in the KS2 stage.

    It depends on where you are and the amount of work on offer. I charge £25 per hour for literacy & numeracy and £30 for 11+ (I live in an area with a lot of grammar and independent schools).

    The majority of my regular students need support in numeracy or literacy. During peak times of the year the 11+ takes over my schedule and then drops off again when they sit the exam.

    All of my students have been privately funded by the parents. However, I live and tutor in an affluent area.

    The work will mainly be after school and evenings. I don't take any work during the day as I'm in school; however, I am aware that there is a small but lucrative market for home schooled children.
     
  5. Thanks for replying. All things considered, I'm not sure it's for me really as I live in a rural area with no grammar schools and have my own children to consider so can't really work evenings. Maybe I should apply for TA jobs, I know the pay is very poor for what they do but it's more than I'm earning at the moment! I've only ever worked in schools, it's all I know and all I really want to do
     
  6. Are there even TA jobs going?
     
  7. If someone dies, maybe. There should be a fair few SEN posts that pop up in June-July for a Sept start.
     
  8. CathySupply

    CathySupply New commenter

    Is it worth thinking about Saturdays, or do you go away a lot and/or do things with the family? I do 3 1/2 hours on a Saturday which brings in quite a tidy little sum. I find that most children who come in the week want to come straight from school so I'm generally free by about 5pm. However, on the days I'm tutoring I can't work in schools (can't get home in time). There's hardly any supply here either, but it's slightly irritating to have to say no to a day's pay because of one tutee ... on the other hand, it's my choice.
    I hear on the local grapevine that a lot of TAs are going to be giving up due to pay cuts. I don't know how true that is. If it is, either there'll be TA jobs going for anyone who wants to work for almost nothing (!) or there won't be anyone to cover primary classes so supply will come bavk into fashion. I do know the last few years have been awful for work and I don't see how standards are meant to rise when TAs are constantly left to teach - no offence meant to any TAs out there.
     

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