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how do i tell my boss

Discussion in 'Personal' started by kangaroo.poop, Jan 4, 2011.

  1. invincible

    invincible New commenter

    We have to love it. We pay through the bloody nose for it [​IMG]
     
  2. We earn more though, too [​IMG]
     
  3. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    Full pay when off sick is variable - depends on contract of employment and length of service. Private sector workers here are generally far worse off than us.


     
  4. invincible

    invincible New commenter

    And we pay more out too. Depends who you work for and how you're paid as to whether or not you earn more here. Have to say I personally am better off here so can't complain.
     
  5. I have read your other thread too. I have to say that all this is a bit of a palaver. Obviously, you are genuinely worried but you don't need to get yourself worked up about spilling the news.
    If you cannot find anything to do with 6 weeks in the house how about write letters to or call friends/family that you've maybe not heard from in a while. Any older relatives who would appreciate the long natter?
    Be pro-active.
     
  6. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Interesting reading about other countries' systems. I am staggered that in Germany people get longer sick pay than do teachers in UK, which I always thought was incredibly generous, and made me feel quite upset when I had support staff ill who stopped getting paid pretty fast. Some sort of twisting was needed sometimes.
    Another poster recently said that in Queensland teachers get just 10 days' paid sick leave per year, but can accumulate it. So if you have no days off this year, then next year you have 20 days, and so on. I think there was a maximum of 50 in any one year., then you went back to 10. Not sure.
    A lot less generous than the England and Wales system - I don't know about Bonnie Scotland.
    In France, when you get a sick note, it says you cannot work at all/can only work for so many hours per day. But it also says whether or not you can leave your house.
    So someone at beginning of sick leave might be unable to work and must stay at home. Later on, unable to work but may leave home between 9 and 12, and 14 and 17 hours.
    I think that's quite a good idea. Here, if you are signed off sick and then seen by parents having a gentle, healthy, stroll, you are considered to be well enough to be back teaching their children, and they complain.
    ____________________________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    The TES Careers Advice service runs seminars, one-to-one career advice, one-to-one interview coaching and an application review service.

    I shall be contributing to the Seminars on Saturday 8th January. TheoGriff Job Seminar
    Look forward to seeing you!
     
  7. invincible

    invincible New commenter

    Yes, sick pay is actually rather generous in Germany, something like 90% of your net pay (I'm not sure so CQ correct me if I'm wrong but I think it's the first 6 weeks are on full pay?). We're also allowed to leave the house to go shopping or go for a walk and so on.
     
  8. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Invincible - the sick pay in Germany is a lot less generous than for teachers in UK, from what you say. Here it is from Tafkam's FAQs:
    Your entitlement to sick pay depends on your year of service. All teachers are entitled to sick pay of varying periods, and this is based on an annual entitlement. The entitlement year runs from 1 April. The allowances are as follows:
    Teachers in first year of service: 25 days full pay. Also, after 4 calendar months of service, you will be entitled to an additional 50 days half pay
    Teachers in second year of service: 50 days full pay; 50 days half pay
    Teachers in third year of service: 75 days full pay; 75 days half pay
    Teachers in fourth year of service: 100 days full pay; 100 days half pay
    For the purposes of this calculation, only working days are used. So, a teacher in their fourth year of service or later is entitled to full pay for the first 100 working days of sickness, as well as full pay during any school holidays or weekends that fall during that time. Normally this extends to a total of approximately 6 months.
    From this, a teacher in 4th or subsequent year gets 6 months full pay, six months half pay.
    This is extremely generous - I doubt if any other workers in UK get that.
    ____________________________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    The TES Careers Advice service runs seminars, one-to-one career advice, one-to-one interview coaching and an application review service.

    I shall be contributing to the Seminars on Saturday 8th January. TheoGriff Job Seminar
    Look forward to seeing you!

     
  9. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    Slightly different in Scotland. When I had to have my hip done the second time I don't know how I'd have managed financially in any other job - the few weeks on half pay really scuppered me as it was.
    6.6 An employee absent from duty due to sickness or injury will
    receive, in any one period of 12 months, sickness allowance as set out
    in the table below:



    <table><tr>
    <td> Service at Commencement of Absence from Duty </td><td> Full Salary for a period of </td><td> Half Salary for a period of
    </td></tr>
    <tr>
    <td> Less than 18 weeks </td><td> nil </td><td> nil
    </td></tr>
    <tr>
    <td> 18 weeks but less than 1 year </td><td> 1 month </td><td> 1 month
    </td></tr>
    <tr>
    <td> 1 year but less than 2 years </td><td> 2 months </td><td> 2 months
    </td></tr>
    <tr>
    <td> 2 years but less than 3 years </td><td> 4 months </td><td> 4 months
    </td></tr>
    <tr>
    <td> 3 years but less than 5 years </td><td> 5 months </td><td> 5 months
    </td></tr>
    <tr>
    <td> 5 years or more </td><td> 6 months </td><td> 6 months
    </td></tr></table>
     
  10. anon468

    anon468 New commenter

    If anyone is concerned about managing on half salary (or no salary!) during a prolonged absence, then it's worth considering topping up your sick pay with permanent health insurance (PHI) via an independent financial adviser. Ideally a specialist IFA who understands the teachers' sick pay scheme.
    One word of caution to anyone considering this, please make sure you take out a plan which specifies 'own occupation' i.e. you are not able to do your own job, as opposed to an 'any occupation' policy.
     
  11. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    I wonder, too, whether other employees are fortunate enough to be allowed an entirely separate, identical entitlement should their absence be due to work related illness or accident.

    Now that I've had a look at the SNCT I see that it has been amended to take account of the new Fit for Work certification:
    6.29 The statement of fitness for work will state that the employee is
    &ldquo;not fit for work&rdquo; or that the employee &ldquo;may be fit for work&rdquo; and may
    benefit from a phased return to work; altered hours; amended duties; or
    workplace adaptations. The council will review the content of the
    statement of fitness for work in discussion with the employee with a
    view to agreeing the basis of return to work. Where further medical
    evidence is required, the council may refer the employee to the
    council&rsquo;s medical examiner.


    But I don't see any changed to the 'accrued leave' arrangements by which you accrue 2 days leave for each complete week of holidays if absent (up to max of 10 days) - I thought that might have changed as a result of the outcome of the case brought to the European Court of Justice in 2009. When I last heard it was under SNCT negotiation and I thought that would be complete by now.
     
  12. invincible

    invincible New commenter

    Yeah, but I'm talking as a bog-standard employee. German teachers usually have civil servant status and are much better off than me as, as a foreigner, I'm not allowed to be a civil servant in the education sector unless they're desperate and I jump through loads of hoops for years to get there.
     
  13. Six weeks full pay from your employer - six months pay from your health insurance.

     
  14. Yes - this is a German perculiarity. I did not have civil servant status either and thus was on a totally different pay scale. It doesn't matter whether you are qualified or not - as a foreigner you are not a Beamte.
    I could have applied for it - but I decided it really wasn't worth the hassle.

     
  15. Oh, and as far as I am aware (never been off that long but my colleague has, I could ask) - the six weeks are not accrued - so you can have more than one stint of six weeks off in a year on full pay - and then the rest is paid via your health insurance.
    Phased return is then a must otherwise your health insurence is invalid - the employer is obliged by law to facilitate a phased return and provide proof to the health insurer. Phased return is generally over six weeks and then is reviewed again. My colleague is out of phased return but still only on 34 hours a week instead of 40 (but only paid for 34 hours now the phased return period is over).
    You can also extend the phased return (by 4 weeks, I think).
     
  16. Oh, and another sick leave/pay thing - if you are pregnant and signed off due to pregnancy issues (e.g. potential premature birth) you are paid full pay for the whole time you are off - even if off for the whole pregnancy.

     
  17. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    It's the very least I'd expect if I had to pay private insurance to cover me if I was off sick.
     
  18. Do you mean Germany?
    It is not private insurance - it is just that we have no central NHS - you can choose who to be insured with.
    You cannot HAVE private insurance (other than a top up policy) unless you earn more than around 50.000 &euro; annual salary and then it is voluntary - you can still stay in the Krankenkasse and pay the normal rate.
    Or if you are self-employed - then you must be insured privately but you can do this via the Krankenkassen too.
     
  19. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    Fair enough - I'm just so used to hearing how we've got it so easy in the public sector generally and in teaching specifically that I'd come to believe that we were somehow in a privileged position. Good to have it confirmed that we're nothing of the sort.
     
  20. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    I dunno - my final salary pension seems pretty privileged to me, compared to what my son will be getting in the private sector.
    Are Scotland's teachers in a similar scheme?
    ____________________________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    The TES Careers Advice service runs seminars, one-to-one career advice, one-to-one interview coaching and an application review service.

    I shall be contributing to the Seminars on Saturday 8th January. TheoGriff Job Seminar
    Look forward to seeing you!
     

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