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how do i tell my boss

Discussion in 'Personal' started by kangaroo.poop, Jan 4, 2011.

  1. With respect, you've missed my point. I agree that HT cannot ask you to work.

    But we have someone posting here about how they don't know how to fill their time. I'm offering a constructive suggestion - they offer to help fill in some of the gaps they create by being away. It would help everyone out and mitigate against the absence. The OP seemed so desperate to work in her threads I think it's a sensible suggestion. Clearly not popular with the far left but it's a valid and legal suggestion nevertheless.
     
  2. Similiar to me then - I am not allowed to enter the premises, nor am I allowed to work from home (if I am signed off sick).

     
  3. See post 40.
     
  4. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    An adult who doesn't know how to fill their time needs a slap!
    No, they don't - for the very reasons I've already outlined - once the precedent is set then that becomes the practice for the school and there are far, far too many threads on here demonstrating that there are many schools where the expectation is that you work when you are off sick.
    This is a long term absence for which proper cover ought to be provided for (as I understand it, in England by insurance).
    Nothing to do with being left - all to do with proper employment law/rights.


     
  5. The 'fit note' was not designed to replace a doctor's recommendation that a person is 'signed off' from work. Follow your own link and read the article.
    I think that you are just trying to wind people up, there cannot be any other explanation for your 'views'.
     
  6. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    Oh..those types of views are widely held in schools - other people who are off sick are swinging the lead and taking advantage so it's no surprise to follow that up with work at home.
    Attitudes like those are one of the major reasons why teachers often find being absent so stressful in itself - they know what the staffroom gossips are saying (sometimes because they've contributed to it themselves).
    I'm always amazed by how many teachers feel they are qualified to comment on other teachers' health.
     
  7. Perhaps leatherpatch's colleagues would give anything for him to be written off sick...
     
  8. Hehe most probably. I'll duck out- clearly shouted down and thoroughly beaten by the masses. She asked what to do. I think it's legitimate to offer to do some work if she can. That's it, really. Maybe my work ethos is wrong but I'd honestly offer- and not because of what staffroom gossips might say.
     
  9. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    I do feel very strongly about this because in a previous role I spent a great deal of time speaking to, advising and supporting teachers who were off sick and who, for one reason or another, were under additional pressure because they were ill. Sometimes, though very rarely, that stress was self-inflicted but mostly it was because of pressure being applied by their HTs, HoDs etc - and because they knew what the staffroom gossips would be saying.
    Setting precedents is always a dangerous game and in the case of absent staff it is particularly sensitive.
     
  10. fantastischfish

    fantastischfish Established commenter

    Having read the entire thread, I really cannot see what further argument is necessary beyond the word of Middlemarch and Theogriff, both headteachers, who have clearly stated that someone signed off sick should not being doing work at home (and certainly should be OFFERING, because this sets a precedent for other people signed off sick).
    Personally, I'd not offer to do work at home. At the most, I'd send in notes for the cover teacher as to where I was up to and what needs covering, although I'd presume that the Head of KS3 and KS4 within my department would oversee planning etc as necessary.
    At home, once I was feeling better, I might consider getting ahead with my own planning for when I returned to work, thus making my own life easier.
    My absence may require other staff to have to work a bit harder, but the HOD and KS3 co-ords are paid a TLR for a reason, and part of their responsibility is to ensure things run smoothly in staff's absence. It's swings and roundabouts. I know that I've covered for absent colleagues when they are attending their child's nativity play and similar, and will probably cover for absence/sickness in the future.
     
  11. I have to say, I don't really understand why there would be a problem with somebody marking or doing some planning in the circumstances described.
    I've been signed off sick twice, once because of glandular fever and once because of a contagious (but not dehabilitating) condition, the first time I was too ill to set work so I didn't and my HOD very kindly sorted that for me. The second time, no one asked me to do anything but I planned lessons and prepared resources simply because I was able to.
    It's personal choice and I for one wouldn't appreciate someone presuming to tell me that I was too ill to plan my own lessons. I'm capable of deciding that for myself!
     
  12. If YOU feel in a position to offer - you cannot impose that expectation on others.
    And you are a nutter if you offer yourself anyway, but that is by the by.
    We should not impose our own expectations on others - and a sick colleague should be supported, not pressurised.
     
  13. But your are setting a precident for fellow colleagues.
    If you are off sick you are off sick - end of.

     
  14. My colleagues are also adults and educated to degree level, celticqueen, and can make the decision for themselves - just as I can.
     
  15. You seem to be missing the point some of us are trying to make.

     
  16. I understand the point, but I disagree with it.
     
  17. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    I think that there's a word missed out here by accident.
    What we've said is that :
    someone signed off sick should not being doing work at home (and certainly should <u>NOT</u> be OFFERING, because this sets a precedent for other people signed off sick).
    Eva was just typing too fast and left it out . . .
    And I'll add something else too.
    The OP shouldn't be worried about telling her Head about being off for 6 weeks, because of the Special Training that all new Heads get, before they are allowed to sit in the Head's Office.
    Special Training One:
    Teacher comes and tells you that she is pregnant: your response is: "How wonderful! I am so happy for you and your partner!"
    You do not reply "Oh no! How shall we cover you!"
    Special Training Two:
    Teacher phones to say will be off work for a month due to illness; your response is: "Oh dear, how terrible for you! What can we do to help - do you need shopping brought round?".
    You do not reply "Oh no! How shall we cover you!"
    We all get that training, through years and years of being previously in schools where it didn't happen quite that way . . .
    ____________________________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    The TES Careers Advice service runs seminars, one-to-one career advice, one-to-one interview coaching and an application review service.

    I shall be contributing to the Seminars on Saturday 8th January. TheoGriff Job Seminar
    Look forward to seeing you!


     
  18. fantastischfish

    fantastischfish Established commenter

    Absolutely, Theogriff! Isn't it annoying when you make a typo and your post ends up saying the exact opposite of what you mean.
    Your should NOT be offering to do work such as marking and planning if you are off sick because it sets a precendant.
     
  19. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    It's what your doctor is qualified to DO and what he DID.
     
  20. Not quite - I was signed off as being unable to attend my place of work. I was however able to plan lessons and did so [​IMG]
     

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