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How did your students do?

Discussion in 'Private tutors' started by adamcreen, Aug 16, 2019.

  1. adamcreen

    adamcreen Occasional commenter

    And how did it compare with what you were hoping for?

    My one A Level student got a B, which is fair, and his parents seem pleased with it.
     
  2. briancant

    briancant Occasional commenter

    I've only heard from 4 of my students they got A, B, B, D, D, E (maths and physics). Slightly disappointed but these things are all relative. I have 6 other students I haven't heard from but I tend to wait for them to let me know rather than contact them just in case....
     
  3. BG54

    BG54 New commenter

    My sole A level Maths student got a D which I was a little disappointed with as I felt she was capable of a C but I know she struggled with Pure Paper 1 in particular. However she is happy as she's been accepted by her preferred University to study Architecture.
     
  4. Piranha

    Piranha Star commenter

    My two students got a B, which seemed about right to me, and an A, about which I got a very happy email from mum about my "support and encouragement". I hope she will say the same about me to her friends! Actually, I would have been surprised if he had not got an A, as he was working hard and seemed to be ticking off most his areas of weakness.
     
  5. Piranha

    Piranha Star commenter

    Just had a touching and very sad email from the mum of the lad I mentioned above. She said that it was lovely to have somebody who believed in him. He was quiet, shy, always polite and keen to do well. I wonder why she thought his school did not believe in him.
     
    briancant likes this.
  6. Ian1983

    Ian1983 Occasional commenter

    I only had 2 Year 13's this year but both got excellent results (A* and A) having had an A and a C respectively in their mocks.

    Something I've learned over the years though is not to use students' results as a guide of how well or how badly I've tutored them. There's so many other factors come into it - their natural ability, their motivation levels, their school lessons etc etc.
     
  7. Ian1983

    Ian1983 Occasional commenter

    I only had 2 Year 13's this year but both got excellent results (A* and A) having had an A and a C respectively in their mocks.

    Something I've learned over the years though is not to use students' results as a guide of how well or how badly I've tutored them. There's so many other factors come into it - their natural ability, their motivation levels, their school lessons etc etc.
     
  8. Piranha

    Piranha Star commenter

    True. To that, I would add "exam panic" which can happen regardless of how good everything else is. But it is still nice to get positive news. And good for future business!
     
  9. Corvuscorax

    Corvuscorax Occasional commenter

    2 disqualifications, anyone heard of this before, or know anything about why this might have happened? The same student, disqualified from 2 exams. she has some mental health problems.
     
  10. Piranha

    Piranha Star commenter

    Am I right in thinking that these did not happen just after the exams, when it might have been due to some exam malpractice, such as having a mobile phone? Later on, it might be due to writing something offensive on the exam paper. I imagine some of you will have seen this. https://inews.co.uk/news/education/...assumed-anti-meat-comments-were-islamophobic/ But the student will have been told why - can you ask?
     
  11. doctoryes

    doctoryes Occasional commenter

    If the health issues affect punctuality then it could be arriving very late for the exams. I think this depends on the length of the exam but more than 30 mins or an hour late would be allowed to take the exam but could be disqualified.
    Having unauthorised materials e.g. a mobile phone in the exam room could also be a likely possibility.
     
  12. Corvuscorax

    Corvuscorax Occasional commenter

    Her parents were told of the disqualification on results day, so it must have been something she wrote on the papers.
     
  13. briancant

    briancant Occasional commenter

    There is only one thing that can lead to disqualification and that's clear evidence of cheating. This business of taking offence at someones views as written on an exam paper has no legal standing and can be over turned. The principle of freedom of speech does just about still exist in this country although it is under severe attack by the permanently offended.
     
  14. Corvuscorax

    Corvuscorax Occasional commenter

    no, it wasn't cheating, it was what she wrote on the exam paper,
     
  15. Piranha

    Piranha Star commenter

    It is very clear in the JCQ rules that you must not write anything offensive. I know students have been disqualified for doing so, as this one was. The one mentioned in my link above appealed successfully on the grounds that the comment was not offensive, but do you know of a case where it was offensive but the disqualification was still removed?

    I am not convinced that the principle of freedom of speech still exists, given that people have been fired because of something they said or wrote and a tribunal has agreed.
     
  16. briancant

    briancant Occasional commenter

    Writing something offensive means saying something like f*** this it's c***. Giving an honest opinion that doesn't happen to agree with the political correctness of the day isn't offensive.
     
  17. briancant

    briancant Occasional commenter

    I've taught and marked maths for years and have never heard of anyone being disqualified for what they have written. I wonder what subject this was. I'm guessing it could only be RE or perhaps History. It seems very unpleasant to hurt a student who has worked for two years by disqualifying them. I would ask for the paper back. If it is a case of them not holding the currently enforced liberal views I would sue the exam board and send details to the press.
     
  18. Corvuscorax

    Corvuscorax Occasional commenter

    it was physics and chemistry she was disqualified from. I still don't know many details, but I'm thinking is there any possibility of appealing n the grounds that she is mentally ill?
     
  19. Corvuscorax

    Corvuscorax Occasional commenter

    I'm seeing the parents later on today, so any insights, suggestions, information, anything at all I could look into, I would be very grateful.. I might start another thread to make this the main topic, and see if more people notice it
     
  20. briancant

    briancant Occasional commenter

    I find it highly disturbing that an exam board will write off a students hard work over two years in two subjects and possible hurt her future. What on earth could be said in a Physics and Chemistry exam to cause this? The exam boards are regulated and they have to maintain fairness and have the students interests at heart. There has already be a case of a disqualification being over ruled this year so I would be optimistic that this could be reversed. I would be very interested to hear the gist of what they said she wrote to warrant this treatment. Good luck with your meeting. I would post on a more popular forum because this seems to be a big issue that would attract a lot of comments.
     
  21. Piranha

    Piranha Star commenter

    Sometimes students write irrelevant things, particularly when it is going badly. Perhaps they said something offensive that had nothing to do with the exam. The disqualification which was overruled was because the examiner misinterpreted an opinion.

    I have no idea what might be used to justify disqualification. Just swearing, for example? I think stuff which is, for example, genuinely racist would count, and I doubt if an appeal or attempt to sue would get very far, unless the appeal is on the grounds of mental illness, perhaps. I think you need to wait to see if the parents know more about what has been said, and then if the school thinks any more can be done. It is a very sad situation.
     

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