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How did I never notice?

Discussion in 'Computing and ICT' started by scarlettheimposter, Jan 24, 2012.

  1. scarlettheimposter

    scarlettheimposter New commenter

    I ran lessons in Games Workshop. Pupils were programming games, keen
    to share the results, reluctant to leave the lesson, sometimes working
    through the lunchbreak.



    What I didn't notice .... but
    Michael Gove did, without coming within a hundred miles of my classroom
    .... was that they were all bored.And doing no programming.
     
  2. scarlettheimposter

    scarlettheimposter New commenter

    I ran lessons in Games Workshop. Pupils were programming games, keen
    to share the results, reluctant to leave the lesson, sometimes working
    through the lunchbreak.



    What I didn't notice .... but
    Michael Gove did, without coming within a hundred miles of my classroom
    .... was that they were all bored.And doing no programming.
     
  3. gavcradd

    gavcradd New commenter

    We all live in our own little bubble... I would argue that my school is exactly like yours, exciting ICT lessons, well attended lunchtime clubs, already introduced GCSE Computing, etc. However, don't kid yourself that all schools are like that. I went to one a few months ago and they were literally crying out for good ICT lessons (I use literally in the correct sense, students stopped me in the corridor and asked if I was going to be be their new ICT teacher as their current lessons were so dull).
    Yes, it's an affront to teachers like you, but then you'll have little to change won't you?
     
  4. Think that's the important point. Posters like the OP or Gav. don't have much to worry about. But they aren't even common IME ; they're actually quite rare.
    Sometimes they are unwanted. Can you imagine a junior version of them starting at the sort of school gavcradd describes ; can you imagine what the kids will conclude from the two different approaches.
    Much of school ICT is the same old stuff over and over again. It's mind numbing. I've been in lessons where I've been really impressed that the kids haven't thrown things at the teacher.
    A lot of it is taught by doubtless good teachers who don't want to venture outside their own tiny little powerpoint/webpage/publisher bubble, who have no ICT/Computing quals at all.
    I started in 1985 with BBC Micros and a Networking system with 2 floppy disks for storage, no GUI (apart from an Art package), and 1 mouse. Despite the hardware being orders of magnitude quicker and more powerful I'm not sure the subject is better for it ; it's probably worse. (And I did teach our SEN children programming, though admittedly that meant something different 25 years ago)

     
  5. Silent85

    Silent85 New commenter

    what programs are you using to program games?
     
  6. We were probably better back then because the (lack of) speed in the computers encouraged patience, trial, error and effort. Now the blazing speed of them encourages nothing but impatience and frustration from the kids who expect results 'now'.
     

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