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How can you measure confidence in numeracy?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by dowager_countess, May 5, 2011.

  1. Hi all. I've had a big challenge in Year 4 this year in terms of confidence in numeracy. Basically they started with very little and a lot were quite shy in lessons and found it hard to give answers and explain their thinking etc. I think that over this year their confidence has developed a lot and I think that almost all of them are now capable of things that they couldn't do before in terms of answering questions, demonstrating on the board etc.



    Is there any way that you can think of that I can show the children how much their confidence has developed? I've been saying things along the lines of how impressed I am and how they might not have been able to do that at the start of the year. I would really like to show them that they are all able and confident mathematicians in a way that they can recognise. This probably sounds very wierd and random but hopefully someone might understand what I'm on about!
     
  2. Hi all. I've had a big challenge in Year 4 this year in terms of confidence in numeracy. Basically they started with very little and a lot were quite shy in lessons and found it hard to give answers and explain their thinking etc. I think that over this year their confidence has developed a lot and I think that almost all of them are now capable of things that they couldn't do before in terms of answering questions, demonstrating on the board etc.



    Is there any way that you can think of that I can show the children how much their confidence has developed? I've been saying things along the lines of how impressed I am and how they might not have been able to do that at the start of the year. I would really like to show them that they are all able and confident mathematicians in a way that they can recognise. This probably sounds very wierd and random but hopefully someone might understand what I'm on about!
     
  3. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    Look back through their books?
     
  4. I have the same issue in Year 6 - hoping and praying that my WT kids get a level this year! Assuming that you did a test in term 1 and are doing one now or in the near future, could you record how many questions were attempted in each paper? IMO the more confidence the children have the more questions they will try to answer...
    Liz
     
  5. Surely if it's their confidence then they will know: isn't confidence about how you feel?
     
  6. Do all children know how to show how they feel?
     
  7. I'm a trainee and I've only been teaching a year 5 class for a few weeks now but they do seem to be a lot more outwardly confident I feel. When I first started teaching, a lot of them refused to come up to the whiteboard to answer a question etc. They seemed afraid to make mistakes and get the answer wrong. Now, a lot of hands go up and they seem more keen to participate which is lovely. I've changed my approach a bit and rather than asking the children if they want to come up to the board, I just remain enthusiastic and tell them to come up, assuming that they'll want to. I've always loved maths and try to make it interesting and fun for them so I'm hoping it rubs off on them. I think the children will know for themselves what they feel confident about and if they're not confident about something, they won't always show it. I do praise children but I just focus on where they are now and where I want them to be in terms of their understanding etc. I like looking back and seeing the progress they've made but it's still early on in my placement. To try to make them more confident, I try to make my lessons as interactive as possible, incorporate plenty of opportunities for assessment and I try to use a range of resources and equipment (when it supports the learning). I also try to adapt my teaching style and try out different things. The children seem to enjoy tackling things in different ways and they seem more excited about Maths. I'm no expert but a lot of interaction and a lot of practise, picking up on things they need to work on rather than just leaving it and moving on, may work. This is just general because obviously I don't know how you're teaching now. Sorry if this is no use to you!
     

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