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How a first day/week might look?

Discussion in 'New teachers' started by Mike138, Jun 2, 2011.

  1. I have just secured my first teaching post for September - I will be in a Year 2 class. Although I have been a teaching assistant for a number of years, I am struggling to think how best to occupy the children for the first day/week. There are the obvious 'getting to know you' activities and having the whole behaviour discussion/classroom contract activity, but what else?
    What does your first day look like?
    What activities/lessons do you do in your first week?
     
  2. I have just secured my first teaching post for September - I will be in a Year 2 class. Although I have been a teaching assistant for a number of years, I am struggling to think how best to occupy the children for the first day/week. There are the obvious 'getting to know you' activities and having the whole behaviour discussion/classroom contract activity, but what else?
    What does your first day look like?
    What activities/lessons do you do in your first week?
     
  3. How about occupying them with learning?! A bit of the first morning set aside to discuss routines/behaviour etc but then straight into business.
    The first week isn't about baysitting.
     
  4. Sillow

    Sillow Senior commenter

    I establish expectations and create a class charter, introduce them to some of the routines and then it's straight in with normal lessons.
     
  5. Sillow

    Sillow Senior commenter

    You beat me to it, PFF!
     
  6. I asked the same question last year and got a similar answer to PFF's. Foolishly I ignored it and spent too much time easing the children in and doing nice things. Took a while to get the class as I wanted it as a result, and so this year I will be doing as Sillow and PFF suggest. Straight into learning with a little bit of time to sort out the routines. Makes perfect sense now!!
     
  7. Read Harry Wong's First Days of School.
    Get your routines and procedures set up so that the rest of the year is not spent playing catch up as you repeatedly re-issue instructions about what you mean by the phrase 'pack away' etc etc.
    Of course you should have quality learning from Day 1, but your priority should be getting your classroom in order so that the platform for learning is steady.
     
  8. Couldn't agree more! The getting to know you part is purely for us. They know each other already. I'd give them a quick bit on your high expectations agree some basic ground rules and explain the rest will come as the weeks progress (circle time or equivalent). Other than that straight into business - I often give homework out in the first day too. Start off like you mean business and you will reap the rewards later on. Start off like a care bear and you'll find it much harder :)
     
  9. I don't know why at secondary there's so much 'getting to know you/getting to know where the class is' etc. The pupils will learn it all pretty quick anyway - getting to know each other will happen much more quickly at break times for them, and not in class. Most are keen as mustard and just want to start real lessons. The fun and games bore them quickly.
     
  10. I've taught Y2s for the past 4 years now. I always start the year with the children decorating a name tag for their drawer in class (gives them ownership of the room and a place to put their bookbags straight away). Then it's a recount of their favourite part of the summer holidays in their writing books (instant assessment of their writing ability so you can group them). After that we get down to work! Straight into the maths units and a good traditional tale to start off in literacy.
    Good luck!
     
  11. 'DON'T SMILE TILL CHRISTMAS' This was the best bit of advice that was given to me many many years ago and I've passed it on to all the NQT's I've mentored over the years. Basically, it means start firm and establish who's boss right from day one. Share your expectations for behaviour, discipline and work ethos with the students so everyone knows what's expected. This way you will achieve good classroom management straight away which gives you more time to concentrate on lesson preparation etc. Don't try to be their 'friend' you are their teacher, and beleive it nor not - you need to earn the respect of your class, it doesn't come with the job description! [​IMG] By Christmas time you should have them eating out of yout hands!
     
  12. Couldn't agree more. I only wish I'd known this last September!!!

     
  13. Please do not take this too literally as many people do. I see a lot of miserable looking PGCE students when they come into school for the first time who confide in the staff room that they were told not to smile! A smile is a great reward, and when used properly is as useful as a sweet/sticker/house point/positive comment for praising a child. As long as you are not smiling when you are nervous (which people often do) it is a great tool to use. Also if you are a naturally cheerful person don't go out of your way to be a super stern hardass, be fair and consistent and respect will follow. Forcing yourself not to be cheerful can make people quite depressed, remember you are only human and so are the kids (in most cases!).
     

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