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Horror Stories

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by the hippo, May 5, 2011.

  1. the hippo

    the hippo Established commenter Community helper

    There have been a number of references in the TES to the dreadful employment situation for teachers in the UK. Are these just rumours or what? Recently an article said that 17,000 teaching jobs would be lost in the course of the next academic year, with more to follow. Then there was the story about the school advertising two primary jobs. There were more than 500 applicants. Well, to cut a long story short, what are the implications of all this for international schools? Will it make any difference or not?
     
  2. the hippo

    the hippo Established commenter Community helper

    There have been a number of references in the TES to the dreadful employment situation for teachers in the UK. Are these just rumours or what? Recently an article said that 17,000 teaching jobs would be lost in the course of the next academic year, with more to follow. Then there was the story about the school advertising two primary jobs. There were more than 500 applicants. Well, to cut a long story short, what are the implications of all this for international schools? Will it make any difference or not?
     
  3. percy topliss

    percy topliss Occasional commenter

    I have to say that 17'000 does seem a tad steep. Also with both teachers and heads voting to strike recently it seems a little like turkeys voting for Christmas. It could certainly have a knock on effect though for us overseas bods, if there is a vast pool of unemployed but experienced talent to be cherrypicked from home the owners/runners of schools overseas may see it as a chance to lower wages and conditions yet still pick up staff. Perhaps we will see less whinging on here too?
    Interesting times,

    Perce
     
    max5775 likes this.
  4. Mainwaring

    Mainwaring Established commenter

    Oh, I hope not. May you live in
     
  5. MisterMaker

    MisterMaker Occasional commenter

    Heads will have to kowtow a little bit more and the underlings will have to pretend to like the Heads a little more, so we can all have a bit of job security.
    Hmmm, job security and life as an overseas teacher; seems like one of those unfathomable thingies. What is the word I'm looking for?
     
  6. englishtt06

    englishtt06 Occasional commenter

    It's probably true that there will be many lay-offs in the coming years but I remember being told many times that the majority of the current teaching population in the UK are close on retirement - for anecdotal evidence look around any UK secondary staffroom and see equal numbers of very young and very old staff, with a minority inbetween in the middle-middle ages! So yes, jobs will go, but how many are because of retirement or voluntary redundancies? And, if you think about this figure of 17,000, how many primaries, secondaries, post-16 work places are there in the UK in both private and public sectors? Would that equal to one person per school? In regards to the 500 applicants for 2 primary posts, this has been the case for several years - teacher training is in no way accountable to supply and demand and trainees in certain areas (Cornwall and Devon as cases in point) struggle to find jobs if they aren't flexible enough to move. In my last school in the UK (which I left last year) the Head [gleefully?] dangled the threat of redundancies/poor job market just before every unpopular change he introduced. And, as a final point, the UK economy finally picked up in the last quarter so there is hope yet....
     

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